Photos: Explore New Zealand

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  1. Kepler Track

    The 60 kilometer Kepler Track rewards serious hikers with full-strength high country scenery. The track leads to views of lakes Te Anau and Manapouri, the alpine grasslands of Jackson Peaks and spectacular U-shaped glacial valleys. Department of Conservation huts provide accommodation during the 4 day walk. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Water sport paradise

    With more than 15,000 kilometers of coastline, New Zealand is a water sport paradise. Sailing, swimming, diving and fishing are just some of the options for marine recreation. Or you could test yourself with one of the more extreme sports, like kite surfing and wave jumping. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Poor Knights

    The fish of the Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve are famous for their friendly nature, and some of the subtropical species are found nowhere else in New Zealand. Spotted Black Groper, Mosaic Moray and Lord Howe Island Coralfish are a few of the local stars. Squadrons of stingrays can also be seen during the warmer months. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Milford Sound

    A couple paddles their kayaks while flanked by a dolphin in New Zealand's Milford Sound in the country's stunning fiordland. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. That's our bird!

    Unique to New Zealand, there are five kinds of kiwi - three closely related Brown kiwis, the Little Spotted Kiwi and the Great Spotted Kiwi. Nocturnal and flightless, the kiwi’s long slender bill has nostrils at the lower end, so that it can detect worms, insects and grubs. Despite its awkward appearance, a kiwi can outrun a human. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Mount Cook National Park

    Glaciers cover 40 percent of Mount Cook - or Aoraki National Park, as it is also known - and is New Zealand's top spot for spectacular alpine scenery, and is the country's highest mountain. All but one of its 29 peaks is over 3,000 meters, so the park has become New Zealand's mountain climbing mecca. Non-climbers can enjoy a selection of challenging alpine walks - from the one hour Red Tarns stair-climb to the relatively flat hike to Kea Point. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Preserving culture

    The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, in Wellington, preserves and presents the taonga (treasures) of New Zealand's people. Spectacular long-term exhibitions are enhanced by diverse short-term exhibitions and a captivating events program - performances, talks, lectures, entertainment and more. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Maori men

    Ethnic Maori men from Gisborne, New Zealand, take positions on the beach after the arrival by boat of elders from Cook Island, Wednesday, December 29, 1999, to join in Gisborne's millennium celebrations. History has been harsh to the indigenous Maori and Moriori of New Zealand, but their resurgent cultures were at center stage when the country became the first major nation to enter the new millennium. (David Guttenfelder / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Pure Middle-earth

    The fast running rivers of the Mount Aspiring National Park can be negotiated by jet boat and kayak, allowing visitors to discover the locations for the 'Lord of the Rings' Isengard, Lothlorien and Amon Hen. With not a manmade structure in sight in this remote wilderness, it’s easy to imagine yourself in 'Middle-earth'. (www.newzealand.com) Back to slideshow navigation
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updated 6/9/2006 1:08:09 PM ET 2006-06-09T17:08:09

Overview

Auckland, New Zealand's biggest city, is a common starting or ending point for Australia/New Zealand cruise itineraries. Perched near the upper end of the North Island, it has an ideal location for cruise lines looking to schedule calls in other North Island ports (Wellington, Napier, Picton) and South Island towns (Dunedin and Christ Church) in between here and Sydney.

Auckland is, no doubt about it, the most bustling and cosmopolitan city in New Zealand. But what surprised me when I first arrived, after nearly 26 hours spent traveling from the U.S. East Coast, was that it didn't feel at all as exotic as I expected -- at least at first glance.

As far as architecture is concerned, downtown Auckland has experienced a building boom in the past 20 years or so. Unfortunately, that means that there's little historic charm; indeed, the concrete and glass Sky Tower, a massive "needle" type attraction built in 1996, is the city's most iconic landmark. Even buildings currently under construction look like they've stepped right out of the 1970's, with their overuse of concrete, rather than dynamic and modern. There are a few signs of the city's past -- the revitalized Ferry House by the waterfront, which houses a couple of restaurants and a gelato bar, is a good example -- but downtown's growth by and large has been marked more by knocking down old buildings than by renovating them.

What makes Auckland a truly unique destination is its fabulous proximity to the water. Lining the Waitemata Harbor -- which leads to the Gulf of Hauraki and the Bay of Islands -- the city's waterfront bustles with ferry traffic. From downtown it's an easy hop to Waiheke Island, a one-time hippie hangout that's now earning recognition for its beautiful vistas and thriving winemaking culture. There's Devonport, on the north shore, a charming coastal town (with a great view of Auckland across the harbor); it's replete with cafes, parks and shops. Beyond the more urban waterways you can travel to other scenic spots -- from the gentle Seabird Coast to the south to the rugged Pacific-fringed Northland in the opposite direction. Both are easy daytripping options.

Another geographic highlight of Auckland, which sits on an isthmus, is its 46 volcanic hills that are scattered around the city. They're easily identifiable, rising suddenly and steeply and featuring flat tops. On some, such as Mt. Eden, the craters are mossy and furry with grass. You can drive or walk to the top. The views, stretching past the harbors of Waitemata and Manukau and bordered by mountain ranges, are almost as good as those from Auckland's famous Sky Tower.

What will also impress you is the friendliness of the folks who live and work here. The sense we got, over and over again, is that Aucklanders really do revel in the city's relatively newfound popularity amongst tourists -- whether from the South Island, Australia (a three-hour flight away and the closest major land mass) or from Asia, Europe and the U.S. The people we've met after three days here are quick to display a strong sense of pride in their city and take it upon themselves to make sure you've enjoyed your visit.

Nearly everyone working in the hospitality arena -- hotels, shops, restaurants, taxis -- is superbly gracious and efficient (and, interestingly, it's not the anticipation of a gratuity that spurs them -- tipping, outside of restaurants, is not really encouraged here). The friendliness is intrinsic, starting with the city buses operated by Stagecoach Auckland; those not carrying passengers offer signs saying "sorry" before they move into "out of service."

There were numerous other examples of excellence, like he cab driver who got lost -- and said "my fault, let's start that meter over." At our hotels, all requests -- a quick turnaround on our dry cleaning, an American-friendly electric plug, extra furniture for the balcony and even a quick jump start when our rental car's battery went dead -- were met with smiles and quick follow-through.

The only place where we encountered big-city brusqueness was, ironically, in the Viaduct, a place basically designed to attract tourists (locals, too). Lining the Viaduct Basin, it's one of the few old structures that has been restored and is chock-a-block with cafes, pubs and bistros. One night, we slid into Pat O'Hagan's, an almost eerily quiet Irish pub. The girls behind the bar were so consumed with wiping plastic-covered menus that they were too busy to wait on a lone table of two walk-ins. After spending an awkward 15 minutes being ignored, we walked out, only stopping to ask: "What do you have to do to get service here?" One of the barkeeps smirked and said, "You come to the bar."

She couldn't have been an Aucklander -- or even a New Zealander, come to think of it. Her manners were too poor.

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Language
English.

Currency & Best Way to Get Money
One U.S. dollar is equal to about 1.60 New Zealand dollars (check http://www.xe.com/ for the most current rates). ATM's are plentiful, as are banks and currency exchange operations. While at first glance you may feel sticker shock -- prices do seem expensive (particularly in shops and restaurants, not so much at hotels) -- remember that U.S. travelers, at least, are paying a bit less.

Where You're Docked
Ships dock at Princes Wharf, right alongside the Hilton Hotel in the heart of downtown Auckland.

Hanging Around
Princes Wharf is located right in the heart of Auckland's waterfront. Numerous cafes, bistros, cyber centers and shops are within minutes by foot (and the city's main shopping district is about a 10-minute walk).

Getting Around
There are three primary ways to get around the city of Auckland and its nearby attractions. Walking is the best way to explore downtown. To get beyond the central business district (CBD), look for a bus called "The Link". Taxis are relatively plentiful; many, such as those that serve the airport, accept credit cards.

Don't Miss
The Sky Tower (Victoria and Federal streets) is the perfect "I just got to Auckland" place to visit. At 1,082 feet high, it, er, towers above the city. Its observation deck offers a superb 360-degree panoramic view; visual guides are provided. One of the creepiest features of the observation deck -- at least for this vertigo sufferer -- is the thick, clear glass panels placed in the floor. Step on them and look down many hundreds of feet to the street level. Kids seemed to have no fear of walking on them but I could not, for the life of me, force myself to do it! There's a terrific gift shop at the basement entrance to the observation deck. And there's more to Sky Tower than merely observing the view -- the truly daring can also leap off the Sky Deck, a bungee jumping experience that spans more than 600 feet, or take the Vertigo Climb, which ultimately takes you up to the 1,000-foot level. Fees start at $18 (adult) to visit the observation lounge and escalate rapidly for the more adventurous activities.

Sky Tower is part of the Sky City complex; it offers a huge casino along with some restaurants and shops.

The Auckland Museum (Auckland Domain, Park Road) is not to be missed. You'll spy it immediately from the Sky Tower vantage point: the Greek Revival style structure makes it easily the most distinctive building in Auckland. Many of its exhibits center around New Zealand's Maori people, the original inhabitants of the island, but it also has displays focusing on local history and geography.

Go shopping along Queen Street, the city's major hub for fashion, restaurants and cafes. Those interested learning about New Zealand's fashion designers should make sure to visit Smith & Caughey, the city's main department store, and Vulcan Lane (between Queen Street and O'Donnell), where many of its most interesting boutiques are clustered.

For those in search of local charm and character, don't miss a foray into Parnell or Ponsonby, two of the city's most interesting neighborhoods. Parnell is a bit more elegant; there you'll find jewelry and artisan boutiques, cozy sidewalk cafes and the Parnell Rose Gardens. Ponsonby is hipper and funkier, with trendy designer shops, sleek restaurants and, for those who overnight in Auckland, the city's sleekest bars and nightclubs.

Been There, Done That
Waiheke Island, located a 35-minute ferry ride away from the Auckland waterfront, reminded me a bit of the U.S. Virgin Islands' St. John. Like that island, Waiheke was once famed as a nesting spot for people in search of alternative lifestyles and really gained prominence as a destination for arty folks in the 1970's. These days, it attracts Auckland commuters and active types drawn to its great beaches and water sports. It also appeals to connoisseurs of food and wine -- Te Whau Vineyard features one of the most storied restaurants in Auckland, with marvelous views of Waiheke Island, Rangitoto and the Auckland Isthmus.

Kelly Tarlton, New Zealand's most famous treasure hunter, has launched Kelly Tarlton's Underwater World and Antarctic Encounter, a marine park located harborside that offers everything from a fish's-eye view of the sea to an Antarctic adventure.

Devonport, which dates back to the mid-19th century and was the first settlement on the north side of the harbor, is simply a very pleasant town in which to while away an afternoon -- particularly if you've succumbed to sightseeing burnout. A small village with a main street of shops and boutiques, Devonport faces Auckland proper from across the bay. Attractions there include the tunnels of North Head and the Navy Museum, but we simply enjoyed a meal at the Victorian Esplanade hotel and went window shopping.

Take a tour of the Lion Brewery. A New Zealand icon that produces Lion's Red and the ubiquituous Steinlager (you'll see it everywhere), Lionzone offers a tour with samplings. Lionzone is located on the edge of Newmarket, an outlying area of the city that's full of main-street-style shops and cafes.

Rangitoto Island, which emerged as an erupted volcano, is a great place for hiking through lava fields and into lava caves. You can even stroll around the crater's rim. Fullers' ferries offer year-round departures.


  
Lunching
Downtown -- Casual Dining: Head over to the Viaduct for a whole range of restaurants including Degree Gastrobar (204 Quay Street) and Soul Bar. We loved the Belgian-influenced Occidental Cafe (3 O'Connell Street), a great place for a pint and a bowl of steamed mussels.

Downtown -- Big Night (or Day) Out: Harbourside specializes in seafood and even better it offers the finest harbor views, via its second-floor outdoor deck; definitely try to snag one of those tables on a nice day (or night). Locals unanimously recommended the French Cafe (210 Symonds Street) though, alas, we didn't get there. Don't miss out on the steamed mussels (and a great local wine list) at the O'Connell Street Bistro.

The Neighborhoods: In Ponsonby, you really can just stroll up and down the main drag and pick an eatery based on your mood (they come in all shapes and sizes); we enjoyed Prego (226 Ponsonby Road) for its wood-fired pizzas. Options also include Malyasian, Thai, Japanese, regional New Zealand, French, Italian, and on and on. The restaurants are pretty much clustered in the 100 - 200 blocks of Ponsonby Road. Nightclubbers: There's a lot of action here after dinner as well.

Waiheke Island: Take a cab from the ferry dock to the aforementioned Te Whau (reserve before you leave home). VinoVino Restaurant and Bar, (3/153 Ocean View Road) is the only place in the town of Oneroa that offers scenic waterfront dining.

Accommodations
Best Value for Money: Housed in one of Auckland's historic buildings -- the former Farmers Department Store -- the Heritage Auckland offers a great value. It's comprised of two buildings: the old one, which was restored in 1998, and a newer addition (in the latter, rooms come with balconies). Ask for a harbor view -- and a room with a balcony. What we loved about this place was all the services: two pools (one outdoor rooftop pool had awesome views of the harbor and city), restaurants, kitchenette and bathrooms with washer/dryers!

Most Cruise Ship-esque: At first glance, the Auckland Hilton looks like something out of Greece's Santorini -- with sharp contemporary edges and so sleekly white that the water of the harbor almost reflects on its exterior. Built right up against the cruise ship dock (views could be hampered if a big vessel was actually in port), we loved the feeling, while standing on our balcony, of being surrounded by the sea. Just like cruising! The hotel is very contemporary inside, a real hipsters' place, with a highly acclaimed (though somewhat pretentious) restaurant and a fabulous bar.

Most Intriguing Boutique Hotel: Mollie's is a small, 16-suite hotel in a restored Victorian mansion that's as luxurious as it is eccentric. It overlooks Waitemata Harbour.

Staying in Touch
Internet access is available at the New Zealand i-SITE Visitor Information Centre (137 Quay Street, Princes Wharf) and Citinet Cybercafe (Shop 4, 115 Queen Street).

For More Information

On the Web: Tourism New Zealand
Cruise Critic Message Boards: Australia and New Zealand
The Independent Traveler Message Boards: New Zealand

Cruise Critic, which launched in 1995, is a comprehensive cruise vacation planning guide providing objective cruise ship reviews, cruise line profiles, destination content on 125+ worldwide ports, cruise bargains, tips, industry news, and cruise message boards.

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