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Chopin Vodka

Start sentence tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

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This premium vodka comes from Chopin distillers extra lorum.

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Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

Not just for granola-crunching, tree-hugging stereotypes, organic food has reached the mainstream. Today, suburban moms are just as likely to reach for a bag of organic apples as their hippie-er predecessors. Now available everywhere from farmers' markets to mega-grocery stores, organic food is grown according to a strict set of standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including no synthetic chemicals or artificial pesticides.

Consumers who've gone organic -- and who plunk down the premium prices to ride the natural-food train -- cite the lack of toxic residue, higher nutritional value and even better taste, but experts say there's still plenty of research to be done.

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