August 10, 2006

On the heels of MSNBC.com's 10th anniversary, a recent study by the Pew Research Center confirms the site's powerful consumer appeal to the online news market. Among those who regularly get news online, 31% of consumers use MSNBC.com most often, more than eight points higher than its closest competitors. CNN.com and Yahoo! News rank a distant second at 23% each. Compared to its online TV competition, the difference is staggering. FOXNews.com, ABCNews.com and CBSNews.com were regularly used only 8%, 4% and 1% of the time, respectively.

"At MSNBC.com, we are committed to providing a robust news experience with something for everyone," said Charlie Tillinghast, president of MSNBC.com. "From the hard core news junkie to the casual reader, it is evident from this survey that we are the first choice for online news consumers across the board."

According to the study, there has been a dramatic shift in news consumption overall over the past ten years. In 1996, online news accounted for less than 1% of total news consumption, which was dominated by nightly news broadcasts and local TV news. This year's study indicates that online news popularity has skyrocketed, with more than 30% of news consumers now reading online news "three or more days per week" -- more than the current number of consumers who "regularly watch" nightly news broadcasts and network morning news broadcasts. In addition, newspaper readership has dramatically declined from more than 50% of consumers reading a print newspaper ten years ago to only a combined 43% reading the print and online versions of newspapers today.

The Pew findings further bolster MSNBC.com's leadership position in the industry. MSNBC.com consistently tops all online competition from any of its TV or print news peers in both the Comscore and Nielsen ratings. In fact, MSNBC.com's monthly unique users total more than the unique users of CBSNews.com, ABCNews.com and FOXNews.com combined. Its groundbreaking original journalism has won numerous awards, most recently the National Press Club Best Journalism Site.

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