updated 11/20/2006 6:10:57 PM ET 2006-11-20T23:10:57

While visiting Vietnam on Friday, President Bush drew parallels between the Vietnam War and the war in Iraq.

"We'll succeed unless we quit," he said. "One lesson is that we tend to want there to be instant success in the world, and the task in Iraq is going to take a while.

"It's just going to take a long period of time for the ideology that is hopeful, and that is an ideology of freedom, to overcome an ideology of hate. Yet the world that we live in today is one where they want things to happen immediately."

Tonight on "Countdown," Keith Olbermann delivers a special comment about the president's speech in Vietnam.

You can read an excerpt below.

"We'll succeed," the president concluded, "unless we quit."

If that's the lesson about Iraq that Mr. Bush sees in Vietnam, then he needs a tutor.

Or we need somebody else making the decisions about Iraq.

Mr. Bush, there are a dozen central, essential lessons to be derived from our nightmare in Vietnam, but "we'll succeed unless we quit," is not one of them.

The primary one -- which should be as obvious to you as the latest opinion poll showing that only 31 percent of this country agrees with your tragic Iraq policy -- is that if you try to pursue a war for which the nation has lost its stomach, you and it are finished. Ask Lyndon Johnson.

Tune in to MSNBC at 8 p.m. ET to see Olbermann's full comment.

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