Photos: Diana's final moments

loading photos...
  1. This photo, made available on Oct. 3, 2007, by Britain's H.M. Coroner office shows Princess Diana turning to look out of the back window of the Mercedes as she travels alongside Dodi al Fayed in the early hours of Aug. 31, 1997, moments before crashing in Paris. (H.M. Coroner via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Princess Diana, in the rear seat, her bodyguard Trevor Rees-Jones, left, and driver Henri Paul are seen shortly before the car crash that killed Diana, her companion Dodi al Fayed and the driver in Paris on Aug. 31, 1997. (H.M. Coroner via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Rescuers and paparazzi photographers, some with names marked, gaze at the wreckage scene after the crash of the Mercedes carrying Princess Diana on Aug. 31, 1997. (H.M. Coroner via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Photographer Serge Arnal is shown among the first on the scene after the crash of the Mercedes on Aug. 31, 1997. (H.M. Coroner via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. This picture shows another scene shortly after the crash of the Mercedes carrying Princess Diana on Aug. 31, 1997. (H.M. Coroner via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Emergency services personnel check the wreckage after the deadly crash. (Scott Baker Inquest via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Emergency personnel look into the Mercedes after the crash. (Scott Baker Inquest via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Emergency personnel, some with their names indicated with arrows, gather around the wrecked vehicle. (Scott Baker Inquest via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. The extent of the damage to the Mercedes can be seen from this image that was shown to jurors at the Diana inquest in London. (Scott Baker Inquest via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. The crumpled wreckage of the Mercedes limousine is shown in the Paris tunnel on Aug. 31, 1997. (H.M. Coroner via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  1. Editor's note:
    This image contains graphic content that some viewers may find disturbing.

    Click to view the image, or use the buttons above to navigate away.

  2. Editor's note:
    This image contains graphic content that some viewers may find disturbing.

    Click to view the image, or use the buttons above to navigate away.

  3. Editor's note:
    This image contains graphic content that some viewers may find disturbing.

    Click to view the image, or use the buttons above to navigate away.

  4. Editor's note:
    This image contains graphic content that some viewers may find disturbing.

    Click to view the image, or use the buttons above to navigate away.

updated 10/3/2007 8:26:41 PM ET 2007-10-04T00:26:41

The coroner conducting the inquest into the death of Princess Diana said Wednesday the inquiry is unlikely to reach a scientific conclusion on whether she was pregnant at the time she died — a possibility that is key to the allegation she was murdered.

Lord Justice Scott Baker, on his second day of laying out the background of the death of the princess and her companion Dodi Fayed on Aug. 31, 1997, said Diana had not given any indication to her doctor, family, friends or associates that she was pregnant.

The jury, made up of six women and five men, has been told to expect up to six months of wide-ranging testimony before making up their minds on whether it was an accident or murder.

Fayed's father, Mohammed al Fayed, has alleged that Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II's husband, directed British secret service agents in a conspiracy to murder the couple — in part because she was carrying Fayed's child.

Baker told jurors that no pregnancy tests were conducted on the princess's body although two British pathologists concluded there were no visible signs of a pregnancy. However, at an early stage of a pregnancy there might be no visible signs, he added.

"It is likely pregnancy is not a matter that can be proved one way or the other in scientific terms," Baker said.


Illegally embalmed?
Baker also spoke of al Fayed's claims that the princess's body was illegally embalmed in Paris to cover up the pregnancy.

Baker noted that none of Diana's relatives authorized the embalming, as one should have done, but it was approved by a Paris police official and British officials.

Baker also discussed al Fayed's claim that his son had purchased an engagement ring, saying that there is conflicting evidence about the purchase and the intention behind it. He quoted al Fayed's spokesman, Michael Cole, as once saying: "What the ring meant we shall probably never know."

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Discuss:

Discussion comments

,

Most active discussions

  1. votes comments
  2. votes comments
  3. votes comments
  4. votes comments