updated 12/27/2007 10:32:45 AM ET 2007-12-27T15:32:45

The Sam’s Club warehouse chain has pulled a brand of ground beef patties from its shelves nationwide after four children who ate the food, produced by Cargill Inc., developed E. coli illness.

  1. Don't miss these Health stories
    1. Splash News
      More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be?

      Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring.

    2. Larry Page's damaged vocal cords: Treatment comes with trade-offs
    3. Report questioning salt guidelines riles heart experts
    4. CDC: 2012 was deadliest year for West Nile in US
    5. What stresses moms most? Themselves, survey says

Cargill asked customers to return any remaining patties purchased after Aug. 26 to the store or destroy them.

The children became ill between Sept. 10 and Sept. 20 after eating ground beef patties that were bought frozen under the name American Chef’s Selection Angus Beef Patties from three Sam’s Club stores in the Twin Cities area.

Sam’s Club voluntarily removed the product from its stores nationwide after the illnesses were reported, the company said.

“We can’t be certain that meat from other stores is not involved, since the brand ... was likely sold at other Sam’s Club locations,” said Heidi Kassenborg, acting director of the dairy and food inspection division of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Cargill, based in Wayzata, Minn., is one of the nation’s largest privately held companies and makes food ingredients, moves commodities around the world and runs financial commodities trading businesses.

The patties were produced by Cargill and had an expiration date of Feb. 12, 2008, Sam’s Club said in a statement. They were coded UPC 0002874907056 Item .700141.

Searching for the source
Cargill spokesman Mark Klein said the company has been cooperating with the state Department of Health and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to determine the scope of the issue.

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture is working with the federal Agriculture Department to determine the source of the contamination.

Cargill learned of the issue Friday, when a compliance officer from the federal Agriculture Department visited the company’s ground beef facility in Butler, Wis., Klein said. Officials had traced the patties to that plant.

Two of the children were hospitalized; one remains in the hospital and the other has been discharged, the Health Department said.

Symptoms of E. coli illness include stomach cramps and diarrhea. People typically are ill for two to five days but can develop complications including kidney failure. People who have developed such symptoms should contact their doctor, the Health Department said.

Sam’s Club warehouse is owned by Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world’s largest retailer, based in Bentonville, Ark.

The Cargill recall comes on the heels of Elizabeth, N.J.-based Topps Meat Co.’s recall of 21.7 million pounds of ground beef amid E. coli concerns. The recall — the second-largest beef recall in U.S. history — caused Topps on Friday to announce that it’s going out of business.

The source of the E. coli contamination at Topps is still being investigated, but USDA spokeswoman Sharon Randle said Saturday that the Cargill and Topps cases are not related.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Discuss:

Discussion comments

,

Most active discussions

  1. votes comments
  2. votes comments
  3. votes comments
  4. votes comments