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updated 10/31/2007 11:22:04 AM ET 2007-10-31T15:22:04

A brief look at eight of the 28 people charged in the March 11, 2004, Madrid train bombings trial, which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,800. An Egyptian who allegedly bragged that he masterminded the Europe’s worst Islamic militant attack was acquitted of all charges, three were convicted of murder, while four other accused masterminds acquitted of murder but convicted of lesser charges. Fourteen other people were found guilty of lesser charges like belonging to a terrorist group, bringing the total number convicted to 21 of the 28 defendants.

RABEI OSMAN SAYED AHMED, 35: The Egyptian national considered one of the masterminds was acquitted of any involvement in the bombings. Also known as "Mohammed the Egyptian," he was arrested in June 2004, in Milan, Italy, where he was convicted of subversive association aimed at international terrorism. Prosecutors say he came to Madrid in January 2004 to meet the local cell and help prepare the attacks.

HASSAN EL HASKI, 45: The alleged leader in Spain of the Moroccan Islamic Combatant Group, or GICM, which prosecutors say may have been behind the bombings, was acquitted of murder but convicted of lesser charges, including belonging to a terrorist organization. Along with Belhadj, Bouchar and Zouhier, he received a sentence of between 10 and 18 years. Haski, from Morocco, was detained in December 2004 in the Canary Islands and is described as having been aware of and having instigated the attacks.

YOUSSEF BELHADJ, 30: Belhadj was acquitted of murder but convicted of lesser charges, including belonging to a terrorist organization. Along with Haski, Bouchar and Zouhier, he received a sentence of between 10 and 18 years. Arrested in Belgium in Feb. 2005, he is believed to have set the date of the attacks and was in Spain for last-minute preparations.

JAMAL ZOUGAM, 33: The Moroccan national was accused of placing at least one of the backpack bombs aboard a train. He was a phone salesman who ran a shop where most of the mobile phones that were used to set off the bombs came from. Zougam was one of the first people to be arrested, two days after the attacks. He was convicted of belonging to a terrorist organization and terrorist murder, and sentenced to more than 40,000 years in prison, although under Spanish law he can only serve a maximum of 40.

EMILIO SUAREZ TRASHORRAS, 30: The former Spanish miner was found guilty of supplying the explosives used in the attacks and was convicted of murder and attempted murder. He and three others received sentences ranging from 34,000 to 43,000 years in prison, although under Spanish law he can only serve a maximum of 40.

OTHMAN EL GNAOUI: The alleged right-hand man of Jamal Ahmidan, he is suspected of taking part in the transport of explosives from northern Spain to Madrid. He is Moroccan. Prosecutors call him a key accomplice in the attacks and are seeking a sentence of 38,972 years. Gnaoui was convicted of belonging to a terrorist organization and terrorist murder, and sentenced to more than 40,000 years in prison, although under Spanish law he can only serve a maximum of 40.

RAFA ZOUHIER, 27: The Moroccan and one-time informant for Spain's Civil Guard, was acquitted of murder but convicted of lesser charges including belonging to a terrorist organization. Along with Haski, Belhadj and Bouchar, he received a sentence of between 10 and 18 years. He was accused of being a middleman between the Madrid cell and Emilio Suarez Trashorras.

Reuters and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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