updated 12/19/2007 11:53:09 AM ET 2007-12-19T16:53:09

A surgeon faces a disciplinary hearing for snapping a photo of a patient’s tattooed genitals during an operation and showing it around to other doctors.

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Mayo Clinic Hospital administrators said Dr. Adam Hansen, chief resident of general surgery, admitted taking the photo with his cell phone on Dec. 11. The tattoo on strip club owner Sean Dubowik’s penis reads: “Hot Rod.”

Dubowik, who had undergone a gallbladder operation, said he learned of the photo Monday when the Mayo Clinic called.

“I got a strange call after my surgery from a doctor who said there was a problem. He said Hansen was on the phone and would explain,” he said.

Dubowik, 27, said Hansen told him he took the picture while inserting a catheter into his penis. A member of the surgical staff made an anonymous call about the photo to The Arizona Republic on Monday.

“He told me he didn’t want me to read about it in the newspaper first,” Dubowik said.

Hansen wasn’t available for comment Tuesday and has been placed on administrative leave. He could face a range of punishment from probation to dismissal.

“Patient privacy is a serious matter, and photographing someone in this manner without a good reason is something we will investigate down to the last detail,” said Dr. Joseph Sirven, education director for Mayo Clinic Arizona, the hospital’s parent organization based in Scottsdale.

Dubowik said he got the tattoo on a bet and that “it was the most horrible thing I ever went though in my life.”

He said he planned to contact an attorney.

“The longer I sit here the angrier I get,” he said.

© 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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