Image: Inaugural preparation
Nicholas Kamm  /  AFP - Getty Images
Just because you're flying into Washington, D.C. for Barack Obama's historic inauguration doesn't mean you need to be rich. Harriet Baskas has you covered.
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By Travel writer
msnbc.com contributor
updated 1/19/2009 12:53:26 PM ET 2009-01-19T17:53:26

If you’re planning to be in Washington, D.C. to take part in the hoopla surrounding the January 20th inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States, you’ll have lots of company. Turnout is expected to be huge.

“Based on the number of phone calls, e-mails and Web traffic we’ve received, we expect this inauguration to be tremendously popular,” said Bill Hanbury of Destination DC. “People want to come here to tap into the energy and excitement this election has generated and be a part of this historical moment.”

So be prepared for crowds, tight security, really cold weather (January temperatures often dip into the 20s), traffic tie-ups, packed buses and Metro subway cars, and plenty of opportunities to just wait around.

Details about the official — and many of the unofficial — inaugural events are being rolled out daily. You can follow along on the Official Inaugural Web site, on the District of Columbia’s 2009 Presidential Inauguration site and at Destination DC. But if you're not one of the lucky 240,000 or so that gets a free ticket handed to you by a U.S. senator or representative, don't fret. And don’t worry if your marching band doesn’t get that invitation to participate in the Inaugural Day parade. You won’t need a ticket to stand along the parade route and there are plenty of free or low-cost ways to bask in the inaugural day bliss already taking hold of the town.

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For example, at the National Portrait Galleryyou can gaze upon images of the presidents of the United States, including Gilbert Stuart’s famous “Lansdowne” portrait of George Washington and a new exhibition featuring a wide variety of portraits of Abraham Lincoln. At the newly renovated National Museum of American History(it reopens on Nov. 21)a permanent exhibition, “The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden,” displays more than 900 objects relating to all things presidential. Look for President Clinton’s saxophone, President Cleveland's fishing flies and George Washington’s general officer’s uniform. A temporary exhibition opening January 16th will feature more than 60 artifacts relating to Abraham Lincoln and will include the top hat he wore the night he was shot at Ford’s Theater. Admission is free.

At Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.wax museum you can whisper your goodbyes to President George W. Bush, greet President-elect Barack Obama, and give your regards to Thomas Jefferson, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and many other realistic looking former presidents and first ladies. The museum also has an exact replica of the Oval Office, so you’ll have an opportunity to get your picture taken seated behind the president’s desk. Admission is $10 for adults; $6 kids. Family discounts are also available.

Who's who in Obama's Cabinet?The elegant and historic Willard InterContinental Hotel — where Abraham Lincoln stayed on the eve of his inauguration, where Ulysses S. Grant coined the term Lobbyist and which has hosted nearly every president since the mid-1850s — is pretty much sold out. The hotel does, however, have a museum-like gallery tucked away on the first floor that includes historical information, photographs and artifacts relating to presidents who have spent time at the hotel. Admission to the Willard’s history gallery is free.

The Loews Madison Hotel is also sold out, but to join in with the many other dining venues around town that will be offering inauguration-themed meals and cocktails, the hotel’s Palette restaurant will be offering a special Presidential Inauguration menu. Palette’s three-course prix-fixe lunch and dinner menus will be available January 10-25, and will include items served at official inauguration luncheons from every President from Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1957 to George W. Bush in 2005. (Note: Neither Jimmy Carter nor President Ford had luncheons). Menu choices will include cream of tomato soup with popcorn (John F. Kennedy, 1961), Maine lobster Newberg (Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1957), and toffee pudding with caramel sauce (George W. Bush, 2001). The Loews Madison will also have a replica of the White House press briefing area in the lobby and guests will be invited to take a photo behind a podium with the Presidential Seal. Reservations and price information is available at (202) 587-2700.

Slideshow: Presidential journey If you have a strong stomach, head on over to the National Museum of Health and Medicine to see some of the medical oddities linked to past presidents. The museum collection includes a segment of John Wilkes Booth's vertebrae, a molar and some gallstones removed from President Eisenhower, microscope slides of tumors of Ulysses S. Grant and Grover Cleveland, and the brain, spleen and partial skeleton of President Garfield's assassin. The museum also houses the bullet that killed President Abraham Lincoln, the probe that was used to locate the bullet and bone fragments and hair from Lincoln's skull. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.

The swearing-in ceremony of President-elect Barack Obama, the Inaugural parade down Pennsylvania Avenue, the gala balls and expensive dress-up parties, and the many other festivities that will take place to celebrate the new United States President will be excruciatingly well-covered by the media. So consider staying home and having your own inauguration party with your friends and family in front of the big-screen TV you’ll be able to afford if you don’t fly to the Capitol and pay the outrageously inflated hotel rates being charged during inauguration week. President Barack Obama will be making waves in Washington, D.C. for at least four years and the lines at all the attractions listed here — and dozens of others — will be much shorter.

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Photos: Dreaming of D.C.

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  1. A view from the top

    The Washington Monument sits on one end of the National Mall, with the Capitol on the other end in Washington D.C. The monument, one of the city's earliest attractions, was built to honor George Washington, the first U.S. president, and was finished in 1884. (Andy Dunaway / USAF via Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. A model of Freedom

    The plaster model of the Statue of Freedom, which was used to cast the statue atop the U.S. Capitol Dome, and other statues are on display in the Emancipation Hall of the Capitol Visitor Center, which opened in 2008.

    American sculptor Thomas Crawford created the model in 1858. It was shipped in five separate pieces from Crawford's Rome studio. (Alex Wong / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. A contemporary canopy

    The Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard, with its elegant glass canopy designed by world renowned architect Norman Foster, is at the historic Patent Office Building that houses the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.

    Foster worked with the Smithsonian to create an innovative enclosure for the 28,000-square-foot space at the center of the building that is sensitive to the historic structure. The "floating" roof does not rest on the original building, which was built in phases between 1836 and 1868. (Tim Sloan / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Monumental blossoms

    In the spring, blooming cherry trees frame the front of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial at the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. The memorial is modeled after the Pantheon in Rome. (Karen Bleier / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. United in honor

    The pillars that represent different states of the U.S. lie at the World War II Memorial. The memorial, which commemorates the sacrifice and celebrates the victory of "the greatest generation," was designed by Friedrich St.Florian and opened to the public in 2004. (Alex Wong / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Honoring FDR

    The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial near the National Mall traces 12 years of U.S. history with four outdoor rooms, each one devoted to one of FDR's terms of office and feature a sculpture inspired by him. Here, at the beginning of the memorial, is a statue showing Roosevelt seated in a wheelchair like the one he used. (Destination D.C.) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. A spirtual power house

    The National Cathedral is the sixth largest cathedral in the world. It was designed in an English Gothic style and features gargoyles, angels, mosaics and more than 200 stained glass windows. There is even a sculpture of Darth Vader on top of the cathedral's west tower.

    Officially named the Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, it's a cathedral of the Episcopal Church, but it honors all faiths. (Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Strolling by the tulips

    Tourists walk among the blooming tulips in Lafayette Park across from the White House. Mild temperatures in the spring often bring tourists out in great numbers. (Karen Bleier / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Just like old times

    U.S. park rangers dressed in period costumes guide "The Georgetown" up the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal using mules for power during the first canal tour of the season in the Georgetown section of D.C. The Georgetown is an 1870s-period replica used by the park service for tours that depict the history of the canal and the families who lived and worked on it. (Karen Bleier / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Hustle and bustle

    When Union Station was completed in 1908, it was one of the largest train stations in the world -- if put on its side, the Washington Monument could lay within the station's concourse. It is considered one of the best examples of Beaux-Arts architecture.

    In the 1980s, the building was redeveloped as a bustling retail center and intermodal transportation facility. It currently houses Amtrak headquarters and more than 130 shops and restaurants. (Jacquelyn Martin / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Taking flight

    Aircraft are displayed in the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. The hangar features hundreds of artifacts installed illustrating its four main themes: rocketry and missiles; human spaceflight; application satellites and space science. The centerpiece of the hangar is the Space Shuttle Enterprise. (Alex Wong / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Museum of remembrance

    A railcar is part of the permanent exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. The exhibit features more than 900 artifacts, 70 video monitors and four theaters, and includes eyewitness testimonies and historic film footage. (Holocaust Museum) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Carved in stone

    Some of the more than 53,000 names of U.S. casualities carved into the Vietnam Veterans Memorial are shown here. The memorial is made up of two black granite walls that are almost 247 feet long; each wall consists of 72 panels. The design by Maya Lin initially sparked controversy but is now recognized for its simple and reflective beauty. (Win McNamee / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. A somber watch

    A sentinel from the elite 3rd U.S. Infantry marches as the sun rises above the Tomb of the Unknowns on Aug. 26, 2009, at the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. More than 300,000 veterans from all of the nation's wars are buried on the grounds.

    The Tomb of the Unknowns, where three unknown servicemen are buried, is one of the most visited sites at the cemetery. (Tim Sloan / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. National art display

    An untitled aluminum-and-steel mobile by Alexander Calder hangs in the National Gallery of Art. The gallery got its start when industrialist and philanthropist Andrew W. Mellon donated his vast art collection to the nation upon his death in 1937. Mellon's gift also attracted others to donate art to the museum, whose mission is to serve the United States by preserving, collecting, exhibiting and fostering an understanding of art. (Lee Ewing / National Gallery of Art) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Spy this

    The International Spy Museum is the only public museum in the U.S. dedicated to espionage. It includes the work of famous spies and pivotal espionage actions that shaped history.

    At left is a glove shapeed pistol. On the right, is a replica of Cher Ami, the U.S. Signal Corps photo pigeon that was awarded the "Croix de Guerre" by the French government in World War I for heroic service after flying wounded over France for 25 miles in 25 minutes. Cher Ami was equipped with an automatic camera that was taking battlefield photos. (Mark Wilson, Paul J. Richards / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. Reflections of the Americas

    The Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian is the first national museum dedicated to the perservation, study, culture and history of Native Americans. The museum's massive collections include more than 800,000 works of aesthetic, religious and historical significance and span all major culture areas of the Americas. (Alex Wong / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. History in print

    Visitors tour the 9/11 Gallery, which includes a piece of the radio tower from the top of the North Tower of the World Trade Center and front pages of newspapers from around the world, at the Newseum, a 250,000 square-foot museum dedicated to news. The gallery also includes first-person accounts from reporters and photographers who covered the story. (Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. A symbol of democracy

    People look at the U.S. Capitol at sunset. Around the world, the building, which houses the U.S. Congress, is a symbol of America's democracy. It also includes an important collection of American art and has important architectural significance. (Karen Bleier / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. A eye for art

    Sunlight illiminates the dome of the U.S. Capitol. In the eye of the dome is a fresco by Constantino Brumidi called "Apotheosis of Washington," which sits 180 feet above the Rotunda floor. (Karen Bleier / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Retelling history

    Park ranger Jeff Leary tells the story of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln at the Ford's Theatre. President Lincoln, who ended slavery in the U.S., was assassinated in the box, seen in the background, by John Wilkes Booth at the theatre on April 14, 1865, while he was watching the play, "Our American Cousin." (Alex Wong / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. This American life

    The Smithsonian Museum of American History is a treasure trove of artifacts from American life, history and pop culture. The ruby slippers worn by Dorothy in the 1939 movie "The Wizard of Oz," left, and President Lincoln's top hat he was wearing when he was shot are included in the display. (Smithsonian Institution) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. It came from outer space

    People walk around the Apollo 11 Command Module "Columbia" on display at the National Air and Space Museum on July 16, 2009. The museum has the world's largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft among some 50,000 artifacts, ranging from Saturn V rockets to jetliners to gliders to space helmets to microchips. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. A display of freshness

    A vendor puts out fruit samples on Aug 1, 2009, at Eastern Market, where consumers can find a large variety of fresh local fruits and vegetables, flowers, delicatessen, meat, cheese, poultry, bakery and dairy products. Eastern Market, established in 1873, is one of the few public markets left in Washington and the only one retaining its original public market function. (Karen Bleier / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. 'We the people ...'

    A middle-school student views the original U.S. Constitution at the National Archives, billed as the "nation's record keeper." The archives not only house the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence, but it also includes military records and naturalization papers. (Brendan Smialowski / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. Fit for a president

    Thousands of tourists visit the Lincoln Memorial each year. The memorial, which honors President Abraham Lincoln, sits prominently on the western part of the National Mall and offers great views of the other presidential sites. It includes a large sculpture of Lincoln and inscriptions of two of his speeches, "The Gettysburg Address" and his "Second Inaugural Address." (Mark Wilson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. Play ball!

    Nationals Park is home field for the Washington Nationals major leauge baseball team. The park, which opened in 2008, is the first major U.S. stadium that is certified "green." It also has 4,500-square-foot high-def scoreboard and more than 600 linear feet of LED ribbon board along the inner bowl fascia. (Joe Robbins / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. Lighting the way

    A candle sits in a lamp lighting the way for guests arriving to George Washington's Mount Vernon estate as Ben Schulz, left, and Steve Stuart wait for the gates to open Dec. 4, 2004, in Mount Vernon, Va.

    The estate, Washington's former home, is 16 miles south of D.C. on the banks of the Potomac River. Visitors can see 20 structures and 50 acres of gardens as they existed in 1799, a museum, the tombs of George and Martha Washington, and his greenhouse. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. The rise of America

    The U.S. Marine Memorial, left, and the Washington Monument, center, are silhouetted against the sky as the sun rises over D.C. (Karen Bleier / AFP/Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. Happy 4th of July

    Fireworks explode over Washington as the United States celebrates its 234th birthday, July 4, 2010. Seen from left is the U.S. Capitol, Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial. (Cliff Owen / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
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