Image: Temporary shelter in L'Aquila, Italy
Massimo Di Nonno  /  Getty Images
Italians displaced by a deadly earthquake have moved into this temporary shelter in L'Aquila.
updated 4/9/2009 4:34:30 PM ET 2009-04-09T20:34:30

This quake-ravaged medieval city took a limping step toward normalcy Thursday as butchers, bakers and other shopkeepers reopened for business, three days after a deadly earthquake made the historic center uninhabitable and halted nearly all economic activity.

The death toll from Italy's worst quake in three decades reached 283, including 20 children and teens, police said. Premier Silvio Berlusconi said the government also had increased the sum allocated for emergency aid to euro100 million ($132.73 million), and that reconstruction would cost several billion euros.

Strong aftershocks overnight rattled residents — nearly 18,000 of whom are living in tent camps around the stricken region. An additional 10,000 have been put up in seaside hotels, out of the quake zone, and the Italian railway provided heated sleeping cars at L'Aquila's main train station, where nearly 700 people spent the night.

New activity was evident across the city, as pharmacies, grocery stores, butchers, and hardware stores began operating.

Antonio Nardecchia opened up his family's meat stall selling roasted chickens and sausages just outside the crumbled walls of L'Aquila's historic center. The 32-year-old said business was slow.

"We opened up today to try to sell some meat before it spoils," Nardecchia said. "I don't see much of a future. It is not like everything is going to start again tomorrow."

A bakery in a one-story cement block building was a testament to survival amid semi-collapsed houses.

Inside, Evelina Cruciani, 59, made sandwiches with thick slices of freshly-baked bread, ham and mozzarella cheese, and gave them to hungry aid workers or sold them to others less in need for euro3 a piece.

She also sold a seasonal specialty, small loaves of sweet bread traditionally eaten on Easter Sunday with salami. "We need to keep tradition alive," Cruciani said resolutely. "L'Aquila must not die."

Because of the bakery's sturdy construction, Cruciani has been able to keep the doors open ever since Monday's 6.3-magnitude temblor, while the owners baked bread in ovens at a facility nearby. On Thursday, the bakery got its first deliveries of fresh milk and yogurt.

Left homeless
Not everyone was able to escape the predawn temblor with their wallets, meaning some in the tent cities needed to rely on aid until they could get access to their belongings or bank accounts.

Mobile post offices, which also have banking services, have been set up in every tent city to provide a means for the displaced victims to access their own accounts, pick up their pensions or receive money, especially from relatives who have emigrated abroad. People can also top off their cell phones.

Video: Seeking quake survivors in Italy

Workers said several evacuees had inquired about paying their electricity and gas bills, for homes they could no longer access.

Officials have urged residents not to sleep in their homes — but some could not resist at least looking from outside to see if they could assess the damage.

One man, Giancarlo Rasti, persuaded the carabinieri to retrieve a computer containing his son's university thesis. The family was safely in nearby Teremo at the time of the quake, but 25-year-old Michele had a place in L'Aquila, where he studies engineering and is about to graduate.

"It was the most important object for him" Rasti said. "It has all his data inside."

Anti-looting patrols have increased in the quake zone; some residents stayed in cars near their homes to keep watch all the same. Berlusconi on Wednesday said stiffer anti-looting measures would be introduced amid reports the problem was on the rise.

Two people were detained for suspected looting Wednesday in the flattened town of Onna, but were freed after proving to police the euro80,000 ($105,000) they had on them was theirs.

L'Aquila's police chief, Filippo Piritore, striding through the city on Thursday morning, said no arrests had been made in the city for looting, pointing to heavy police patrols. He said some people have been stopped who appeared to be intent on robbing unattended homes and other properties.

Pope to visit
L'Aquila's medieval center has been completely closed to any traffic, making the center a ghost town.

The quake hit L'Aquila and several towns covering 230 square miles in central Italy early Monday, leveling buildings and reducing entire blocks to piles of rubble.

President Giorgio Napolitano toured the quake area Thursday. He stopped at the collapsed student dorm in L'Aquila, visited the nearly leveled small town of Onna, and met with some of the homeless at tent camps. He also stopped at the hangar where the coffins of the victims are lined up before Friday's funeral.


At the Vatican, Pope Benedict XVI celebrated a Holy Thursday Mass that included the traditional blessing of holy oils — some of which the church will send to the earthquake zone as a sign of closeness to the stricken population.

Benedict plans to tour the area sometime after the Easter holiday.

More on Italy | earthquakes

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Photos: Italy in mourning

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  1. Mourners attend the state funeral ceremony for earthquake victims, in L'Aquila, on Friday, April 10. The earthquake on Monday was the deadliest to hit Italy in almost 30 years. Four days after the quake that made L'Aquila and nearby towns and villages uninhabitable, the death toll reached 287, including at least 20 children. (Peri - Percossi / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi reacts as he attends the funerals for quake victims near L'Aquila, central Italy, on Friday. (Luca Bruno / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. A woman and her son leave a rose during the state funeral ceremony for eathquake victims near L'Aquila, on Friday. (Alessandro Garofalo / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Relatives mourn the victims of the earthquake during the collective funeral at the Guardia di Finanza Academy, in Coppito, a village near L'Aquila, Italy, on Friday, which was declared day of national mourning in Italy. (Marco Di Lauro / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. A man walks through rubble in L'Aquila, Italy. (Maurizio Degl'innocenti / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. A woman reacts in a tent camp where earthquake victims reside in Aquila. A series of aftershocks disrupted rescuers on Thursday as they picked through rubble in a search for survivors of Monday's earthquake in central Italy. (Alessandro Garofalo / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Mario Tudisco, a volunteer clown, gives a chocolate Easter egg to a child who was evacuated following the earthquake, in the Abruzzo capital L'Aquila. (Andreas Solaro / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. The coffin of earthquake victim Carmelina Iovine, 22, is carried during her funeral in the Italian town of Raiano. (Daniele La Monaca / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Friends and relatives grieve during the funeral of earthquake victim Carmelina Iovine, 22, in the Italian town of Raiano. (Daniele La Monaca / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Silvio Berlusconi, wearing a firefighter's helmet, comforts an elderly woman in L'Aquila, central Italy. (Livio Anticoli / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Firefighter Roberto Contu of the Rome's S.A.F team inspects the damaged Duomo church downtown Aquila April 8, 2009. The earthquake in central Italy on Monday has badly damaged several historic churches and other heritage sites, the Culture Ministry said. At least four Romanesque and Renaissance churches and a 16th century castle were partially destroyed by the quake centred in the medieval city of L'Aquila. (Alessandro Garofalo / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. A woman holds her child in the tent camp of L'Aquila, central Italy, on Wednesday, as strong aftershocks caused further fear among residents in temporary shelters. As rescue teams continued searching through the debris for survivors, the homeless emerged from their tents after spending a second night in chilly mountain temperatures. (Luca Bruno / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Most of the village of Onna, Italy, lay in ruins on Tuesday. Forty of the town's 300 residents died in Monday's quake. (Max Rossi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. A crane lowers a rescue worker looking for survivors inside a building in L'Aquila on Tuesday. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Rescuers search the debris of a building in L'Aquila on Tuesday. (Vincenzo Pinto / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. A firefighter cries after finding his dead stepdaughter in the rubble of a collapsed building in L'Aquila. (Giampiero Sposito / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. Some of the people who were evacuated after the earthquake spent the night in a gym at L'Aquila's recreation center. (Mario Laporta / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Tent cities were set up around the quake zone, including this one in the village of Paganica. (Sandro Perozzi / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. A woman, still alive 20 hours after an earthquake, is carried by rescue volunteers in the Abruzzo capital L'aquila, Italy. Rescuers scrambled in the dark to find survivors from the powerful earthquake in central Italy that killed at least 150 people, as thousands of homeless sought shelter in hastily built tent cities. (Giulio Piscitelli / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. Rescuers with a sniffer dog search for survivors Monday in the village of Castelnuovo, Italy, one of two dozen communities devastated by the quake. (Alessandra Tarantino / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. People evacuated from their home in L'Aquila protect themselves from the rain with a blanket. The city was the hardest hit, with thousands of buildings torn apart and dozens killed. (Mario Laporta / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. A nun among the homeless joins other evacuees at an outdoor shelter in L'Aquila. (Alessandro Bianchi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. People line up for food at an outdoor shelter in L'Aquila as darkness approached. (Pier Paolo Cito / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. These are among the thousands of homes destroyed in L'Aquila by the earthquake that left tens of thousands homeless. (Guardia Forestale via AP / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. A child is comforted by a Red Cross rescuer at a camp set up just outside L'Aquila. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. The Anime Sante church in L'Aquila was among the historic treasures damaged or destroyed in the quake. (Pier Paolo Cito / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. Rescue workers remove an injured woman from her home in the small town of Onna. (Massimiliano Schiazza / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. A car is buried in rubble in the Onna. Most of the town's homes were destroyed, and its residents made homeless. (Massimiliano Schiazza / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi and Guido Bertolaso, the head of Italy's Civil Protection agency, discuss the tragedy at a command center in L'Aquila. (Livio Anticoli / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. Residents across central Italy, including these elderly women in L'Aquila, stayed outside Monday, fearing more building collapses. (Grillo / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  31. Two men console one another Monday whlie others prepare to comb debris for potential survivors in L'Aquila. (Pier Paolo Cito / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  32. Rescue workers carry the body of a nun found in the rubble of a collapsed monastery in Paganica, Italy. (Giampiero Sposito / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  33. Residents of L'Aquila comfort one another after the quake destroyed much of the city. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  34. A doctor unpacks a rescue kit next to a collapsed building and buried vehicle in the center of L'Aquila. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  35. A car is seen precariously close to a large hole in a road caused by the earthquake in L'Aquila on Monday. (Peri - Percossi / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  36. Rescue workers carry an injured man away from his house in L'Aquila. (Alessandro Bianchi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  37. Workers remove debris on Monday in the center L'Aquila. (Vincenzo Pinto / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  38. Luigi d'Andrea, 20, collects belongings from the debris of an apartment in L'Aquila . (Christophe Simon / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  39. A police officer stands in the center of L'Aquila on Monday. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  40. A firefighter comforts a colleague near a collapsed building in L'Aquila on Monday. (Alessandro Bianchi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  41. Patients are treated outside the St. Salvatore Hospital in L'Aquila. Parts of the hospital were evacuated because it was at risk of collapse, forcing the wounded to be treated in the open air or taken elsewhere. (Gregorio Borgia / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  42. Blanketed against the morning cold, a couple stand amid rubble in the center of L'Aquila. (Vincenzo Pinto / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
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