updated 6/16/2009 9:13:17 AM ET 2009-06-16T13:13:17

The American Medical Association says there's no scientific proof to back up claims of anti-aging hormones.

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At their annual meeting in Chicago on Monday, AMA delegates adopted a new policy on products such as HGH, DHEA and testosterone used as aging remedies.

With HGH, or human growth hormone, the AMA says evidence suggests long-term use can present more risks than benefits. The risks include tissue swelling and diabetes.

And the AMA says there's no credible evidence that other hormones, so-called bio-identicals, are safer than traditional estrogen and progesterone products.

The traditional hormones are only recommended for menopause symptoms at the lowest possible dose because of long-term health risks.

The AMA says anti-aging hormone promoters need rigorous studies to prove, or disprove, their claims.

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