updated 10/29/2009 9:25:55 PM ET 2009-10-30T01:25:55

A rap by four teenagers at a McDonald's has gotten them a bad rap in one Utah city.

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The teens were cited by American Fork police earlier this week for disorderly conduct after they rapped their order at a McDonald's drive-through.

The teens said they were imitating a popular video on YouTube. They rapped their order, which begins with, "I need a double cheeseburger and hold the lettuce ..." once quickly before repeating it more slowly.

Spenser Dauwalder said employees at the restaurant told him and his friends they were holding up the line and needed to order or leave.

The 18-year-old said nobody was in line. He and his three 17-year-old friends left without buying anything.

American Fork Police Sgt. Gregg Ludlow says a manager wrote down the car's license plate number and called police. The teens were later cited by officers at a high school parking lot outside a volleyball match.

"We thought, you know, just teenagers out having fun," Dauwalder told KSL Newsradio. "We didn't think it would escalate to that."

‘They continued to hold things up’
Disorderly conduct citations are issued when someone does something to cause annoyance or alarm, Ludlow said. The citation is an infraction similar to a speeding ticket, Ludlow said.

"It was not just that they were rapping, they continued to hold things up," Ludlow said.

Ludlow said the teens were asked several times to speak plainly and that ultimately the manager came outside.

The owner-operator of the McDonald's said in a statement that the issue was about employees' safety at the restaurant in American Fork, about 30 miles south of Salt Lake City.

"The employee in question felt that her safety was at risk as a result of the alleged actions of these individuals in the drive-thru, not as a result of them rapping their order," franchisee Conny Kramer said in the statement. "As such, she contacted the local authorities."

But Sharon Dauwalder, Spenser's mother, said they will fight it nonetheless.

"We have to," she told The Associated Press on Thursday. "The citation is there."

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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