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Japan video shows delay in using seawater to cool meltdown reactor

TOKYO (Reuters) - A Japanese nuclear power company hesitated before using corrosive seawater to cool the No. 2 reactor at the stricken Fukushima plant because it hoped it could be used again, video released by the company shows, contradicting official findings.Full story

Stressed out? Watch your troubles float away

  One Oregon business gave out free sessions in what's known as a float tank -- a shallow pool of salt water in which people can relax. KGW-TV's Cathy Marshall reports.

Mix seawater, nuclear fuel: Still an unknown

A year after the Fukushima nuclear disaster, questions remain just what happens when you mix seawater with nuclear fuel. Full story

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Volcanic Glass Yields Evidence of Ancient Water

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  Radiation rises sharply at Japanese nuke plant

The radioactivity in the water in one unit of a stricken nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan has tested 10 million times higher than normal, the plant's operator said Sunday. NBC’s Lee Cowan reports.

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Bicycles lay partially submerged in seawater in what used to be the basement of a home swept away by flooding from Hurricane Sandy in the Oakwood Beach neighborhood of Staten Island in New York City, November 13, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Handout photo of MTA employees using a pump train and working around the clock to remove seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, in New York
Handout photo of MTA employees using a pump train and working around the clock to remove seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, in New York

MTA employees use a pump train and work around the clock to remove seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, in New York in this MTA handout photo taken November 5, 2012. REUTERS/Metropolitan Transportation Authority/Patrick Cashin/Handout

Handout photo of MTA employees working around the clock to remove seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, in New York
Handout photo of MTA employees working around the clock to remove seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, in New York

MTA employees work around the clock to remove seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, in New York in this MTA handout photo taken November 5, 2012. REUTERS/Metropolitan Transportation Authority/Patrick Cashin/Handout