Image: Conservative Lobo leads in disputed Honduran election
Efrain Salgado  /  EPA
Supporters of the Honduran National Party celebrate the victory of their presidential candidate, Porfirio Lobo, at party headquarters in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
updated 11/30/2009 2:32:52 PM ET 2009-11-30T19:32:52

Honduras has a newly elected president. The question is whether he can convince the world the vote was legitimate and show that Hondurans want to put a summer coup behind them.

Announcing that conservative rancher Porfirio Lobo was headed for victory in Sunday's presidential contest, election officials said more than 60 percent of registered voters cast ballots, an increase from the last election, when about 55 percent voted.

That would be a victory for interim leaders who hoped a strong turnout would prove the vote's legitimacy and free this poor Central American nation from the international isolation that followed the June 28 ouster of President Manuel Zelaya.

Zelaya was sure to dispute the official numbers. He said information he received from polling places indicated two-thirds of voters stayed home, which he insisted meant the election had no legitimacy and should not be recognized.

The debate over whether Honduras should hold the election without restoring Zelaya to his office overshadowed the campaign.

Lobo, a member of the opposition National Party, led with 56 percent of the votes, with more than 60 percent of the tally sheets counted, officials of the Supreme Electral Tribunal said at a news conference late Sunday. They said Elvin Santos of Zelaya's Liberal Party was second with 38 percent.

Lobo proclaimed the election "the cleanest in the history of the country." Santos, of the ruling Liberal Party, quickly conceded defeat, saying it is time for "unity, the only path to confront the future and ensure the victory of all Hondurans."

Zelaya was ousted after going ahead with plans for a referendum on changing the constitution even though the Supreme Court ruled the vote illegal, and his removal was widely supported by Honduras' elite, including many in his own Liberal Party.

The move drew strong condemnation from the international community, but Sunday's election split Western Hemisphere countries. The vote had been scheduled before the coup as Zelaya's single term ends in January.

The United States, which suspended some aid to Honduras over the coup as it grappled with its first major policy test in Latin America, defended the election. U.S. diplomats said Hondurans had the right to choose their next leader.

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Arturo Valenzuela told reporters Monday that the election was fair and transparent but cannot be the last step in a process meant to fully restore democracy after President Manuel Zelaya was expelled in June.

Valenzuela commended Lobo for winning the election and becoming the next president of Honduras. But he says Honduras' leaders should establish a government of national unity and a truth commission.

Leaders in Brazil and other leftist governments in the region argued the ballot would whitewash Central America's first coup in 20 years and should be repudiated.

It is Washington's support that matters most in Honduras. The country sends more than 60 percent of its exports to the United States, from bananas to Fruit-of-the-Loom underwear, and relies heavily on money sent home from the 1 million Hondurans who live in the U.S.

Ex-president blasts U.S.
Zelaya said the Obama administration would regret its stance on the election.

"The United States made a mistake," Zelaya said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press from the Brazilian Embassy, where he has been living since slipping back in Honduras in late September from his forced exile. "If they are democrats in their country, they should be democrats in Latin America."

Election workers in Tegucigalpa's slums, one of the areas of Zelaya's support, said voting there was slow. But turnout was higher in affluent neighborhoods where resentment against Zelaya runs highest.

Zelaya has support among many poor Hondurans who believed in his promises to shake up a political system dominated by two political parties with few ideological differences and influenced by a few wealthy families.

Video: Voters in Honduras pick new president

Mauro Romero, 59, sat on the steps of the capital's peach-colored 18th century cathedral, now covered in graffiti saying "No to the coup!" He said he would not set foot in a polling station.

"Zelaya is the president that we elected. We don't want the same dinosaurs in power, people who have been there for 30 years, only getting fat," Romero said.

But many Hondurans simply want to end the crisis that has eroded an already stagnant economy. Tourists have disappeared from Mayan ruins and rain forests, and multilateral lending agencies have blocked the country's access to credit.

Lobo, 61, promised to encourage private investment to create jobs while increasing social benefits in a country where 70 percent of the 7 million people are poor.

As president, Lobo said he would talk with Zelaya and suggested the deposed leader might be allowed to leave the Brazilian Embassy without fear of arrest. Zelaya faces abuse of power charges for ignoring the Supreme Court order to cancel the constitutional change referendum.

Under a U.S.-brokered pact, Congress is scheduled to decide Wednesday whether Zelaya should be restored to office as head of a unity government until his term expires Jan. 27. Despite its support of the election, the United States insists it still supports Zelaya's reinstatement.

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Photos: Election in Honduras

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  1. Porfirio "Pepe" Lobo, right, candidate of Honduras' National Party, celebrates along with his wife Rosa after winning in the presidential elections in Tegucigalpa on Nov. 29, 2009. Lobo, a wealthy landowner, had over 55 percent support with more than half the votes counted and his closest rival, Elvin Santos of the ruling Liberal Party, then conceded defeat. (Edgard Garrido / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Elvin Santos, center, presidential candidate of the Liberal Party, concedes defeat in the presidential election to National Party candidate Porfirio Lobo during a news conference as he sits next to his wife Becky in Tegucigalpa on Sunday. (Henry Romero / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. The president-elect of Honduras, Porfirio Lobo, addresses supporters in Tegucigalpa on Nov. 30, 2009. (Claudia Barrientos / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Supporters of Elvin Santos, presidential candidate of the Liberal Party, watch news of election results on television at the party's headquarters in Tegucigalpa on Sunday. (Henry Romero / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Supporters of presidential candidate Porfirio Lobo celebrate before official results are released in Tegucigalpa, on Sunday. (Esteban Felix / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Porfirio Lobo, presidential candidate of the National party, right, greets supporters outside a polling center where his wife voted in general elections in Santa Lucia, Honduras, on Sunday. (Esteban Felix / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. A woman holds a Honduran flag painted with fake blood during a march against the celebration of general elections in Honduras, in San Salvador, El Salvador on Sunday. (Jose Cabezas / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. A security guard brandishes a gun outside a store in Tegucigalpa, which was being barricaded Saturday, Nov. 28, against possible violence during the presidential elections. (Tomas Bravo / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. People look over electoral papers as they prepare to cast their votes during the Honduran general elections at a polling station in Juticalpa, Honduras, on Sunday. (Ulises Rodiguez / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Women walk past a wall with election-related graffiti in Juticalpa, Saturday. (Henry Romero / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Soldiers exit a truck on Saturday in Tegucigalpa. Fears of violence spread through the Honduran capital ahead of Sunday's post-coup elections. De facto leader Roberto Micheletti, who stepped down briefly over the electoral period, accused supporters of deposed President Manuel Zelaya of secretly setting up bomb attacks to disturb the polls, and blamed them for putting "psychological pressure" on voters to urge them to boycott the election. (Orlando Sierra / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. A volunteer hangs up posters of candidates at an information booth in Tegucigalpa on Sunday. (Claudia Daut / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. A man prepares ballots at a polling center in Tegucigalpa, Sunday. (Esteban Felix / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. Porfirio Lobo, the National Party presidential candidate, greets supporters after voting in the village of Juticalpa, Tegucigalpa, Sunday. (Eduardo Verdugo / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. A voter casts his ballot at a polling station in Juticalpa on Sunday. (Henry Romero / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Elvin Santos, center, presidential candidate of the Liberal Party, gestures before the media after casting his vote at a polling station in Tegucigalpa on Sunday. (Edgard Garrido / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. A soldier stands guard in the doorway of a polling center in Tegucigalpa on Sunday. (Esteban Felix / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya speaks during an interview inside the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa, Honduras on Sunday, as voting is taking place. (Andres Conteris / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. Activists from Hondurans for Democracy, School of the Americas Watch, Witness for Peace, and other Washington, D.C.-based organizations stage a protest in Washington on Sunday. (Jim Watson / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. A woman has her finger marked with ink after voting in the Honduran general elections on Sunday, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in New York. (Stan Honda / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Honduras' interim President Roberto Micheletti waves after casting his ballot in Progreso, Sunday. (Arnulfo Franco / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. Riot police officers knock down a supporter of ousted Honduran president Manuel Zelaya during a protest in San Pedro Sula, about 155 miles north of Tegucigalpa, on Sunday. (Elmer Martinez / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. Demonstrators protest the June coup against President Manuel Zalaya and general elections in San Pedro Sula, Sunday. (Arnulfo Franco / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. (Efrain Salgado / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
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