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Consumer sentiment up in April, price fears ease

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Consumer sentiment rose in April as the sharp increase in gasoline prices was viewed as being temporary, a survey released on Friday showed. Full story

Yale management school, IBM in partnership

The Yale School of Management and IBM Corp. are collaborating on an academic program to teach a curriculum of analytics, which measures consumer sentiment and mines numerous sources of data to improve marketing and sales. Full story

British GDP remained flat over six months

   Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, Ed Balls, joins Morning Joe to discuss news that the British GDP rose by 0.5 percent in the first quarter of 2011 and why he thinks British PM David Cameron has "his head in the sand."

Asian stocks up after Wall Street rally

Asian stocks headed upward Wednesday after strong corporate earnings and rising consumer confidence sent Wall Street stocks to their highest levels in nearly three years. Full story

Japan retail sales log biggest fall since 1998

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese retail sales fell 8.5 percent in March from a year earlier, logging their biggest year-on-year decline since March 1998, after a devastating earthquake and nuclear crisis battered consumer confidence, government data showed on Wednesday. Full story

Consumers felt more confident in April

U.S. consumer confidence rose in April as inflation expectations eased somewhat and consumers felt better about the short-term outlook. Full story

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Eurozone upswing strong beyond debt crisis region

U.S. consumer sentiment higher in April

No sign of global economy stalling this year

Sales of wholesale goods slip in February

Japan business confidence falls after tsunami

U.S. consumer confidence slid in March

Retail sales post largest gain in four months

Consumer sentiment at a three-year high

Consumer confidence at three-year high

Consumer confidence at 3-year high

Video

  Despite promising numbers, Americans still without jobs

Although the employment rate fell, why are 13.5 million people still looking for jobs while consumer confidence continues to drop? Former Labor Secretary Robert Reich explains whether this is a sign of a double dip recession.