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Tailored medicine could prevent more heart attacks

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - National guidelines help doctors decide how to treat high blood pressure. But tailoring those guidelines to better fit individuals could prevent many more heart attacks and strokes, say developers of a computer model that makes those calculations. Full story

Volunteers pitch in to help survivors of US storms

Church groups, students and other volunteers worked aggressively Saturday to clear away wreckage and bring food, water and other necessities to communities in southern states ravaged by the second-deadliest day of tornadoes in U.S. history. Full story

Are some blood pressure drugs easier to take?

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - When it comes to treating high blood pressure, people may be more likely to stick with certain types of medication than others, a new study suggests. Full story

Kiddo couch potatoes have narrowed arteries

For kids, too much time spent in front of a computer or TV screen can lead to narrowed arteries in the back of the eyes — an early sign of high blood pressure and future heart disease, according to a new study. Full story

Chelsea to ask for Northera approval in 3Q

Chelsea Therapeutics will seek federal approval for its blood pressure drug, the company said Monday, sending shares jumping nearly 25 percent. Full story

Medicaid to reward recipients for healthy habits

A federal grant program authorized in the health overhaul law is offering states $100 million to reward Medicaid recipients who make an effort to quit smoking or keep their weight, blood pressure or cholesterol levels in check. Full story

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Articles

Pacemaker-like device helps reduce blood pressure

11-hour work days harm your heart, study shows

Orexigen shares climb after study data announced

Vegetarians may be at lower diabetes, heart risk

Heart scan may help cut cholesterol, blood pressure

"Apple" obesity heart risk theory goes pear-shaped

Americans fall short of "ideal" heart health

BP meds may help some people without high BP: study

Potassium-rich diet tied to lower stroke risk

More clinic time won't stave off weight gain

Video

  How to afford organic fruits, veggies

TODAY’s nutritionist Joy Bauer answers viewer questions about how to tame a wild appetite and whether drinking coffee may have an adverse impact on your blood pressure.

  Tips for successful health screenings

Whether you are preparing for a colonoscopy or a mammogram, there are steps you can take to get the most accurate results. Prevention’s Lauren Gelman shares some inside secrets.

  Man drops 182 lbs. to be ‘Joy Fit’

Meet the newest member of the Joy Fit Club, Patrick McCoy, whose weigh-loss journey helped him overcome sleep apnea, diabetes and high blood pressure.

  Free clinic helps uninsured in New Orleans

Nov. 16: The New Orleans convention center was transformed into a one-day free health clinic, with hundreds of volunteers treating more than a thousand people. The clinic was funded in part by msnbc’s Keith Olbermann. Dr. Nancy Snyderman talks with the clinic’s director Dr. Corey Hebert.

  Blood pressure 'pacemaker' takes pressure off meds

Aug. 10: Although one third of American adults have high blood pressure, fewer than half are able to get it under control with available medications, but a new blood pressure pacemaker has proven highly effective in controlling the condition. NBC's Robert Bazell reports.

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Related Photos

Alabama Health Department nurse Janice Smiley checks the blood pressure on a state employee in Montgomery, Ala., Friday, May 31, 2002. Greasy, fried, salty Southern food that's a regular part of many Alabama adults' diets causes higher blood pressure in the state than anywhere else in the nation, he

Checking blood pressure
Checking blood pressure

Alabama Health Department nurse Janice Smiley checks the blood pressure on a state employee in Montgomery, Ala., Friday, May 31, 2002. Greasy, fried, salty Southern food that's a regular part of many Alabama adults' diets causes higher blood pressure in the state than anywhere else in the nation, he

Linda Abby,  Nannie Sutton
Linda Abby, Nannie Sutton

**ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, NOV. 1** This Oct. 13, 2009 photo shows Dr. Linda Abby, right, listening to the heartbeat of 103 year old Nannie Sutton, as her blood pressure is taken in Richmond, Va. Abby is part of a team that sees patients where and when they need it most, in their own homes, before a cris