Skip navigation

Landing gear maker says hasn't been asked to join Southwest probe

(Reuters) - The United Technologies unit that makes landing gear said on Friday it had not been asked to participate in a U.S. investigation into Monday's crash of a Southwest Airlines jet at New York's LaGuardia Airport.Full story

NTSB: Southwest jet's nose gear landed 1st in NY

A Southwest Airlines jet that made a hard landing at LaGuardia Airport touched down on its front nose wheel before the sturdier main landing gear in back touched down, federal investigators said Thursday. Full story

NTSB: Southwest nose gear 'collapsed rearward'

The National Transportation Safety Board says the nose gear of a Southwest Airlines jet collapsed backward and into the body of the aircraft following a hard landing at New York's LaGuardia Airport. Full story

Sponsored Links

Articles

U.S. probes Southwest Air's LaGuardia landing

Pilots challenged by monitoring automated systems

Asiana Airlines to sue KTVU over fake pilot names

Analysis: Well-known hazards seen as likely factors in Asiana crash

NTSB apologizes for gaffe over derogatory Asiana pilot names

TV station reports bogus SF crash pilot names

Witness: Collapsed NJ train bridge problem-plagued

Safety investigators stand by cause of TWA Flight 800 crash

'Pilot error' caused Ohio air show tragedy: police report

Changes urged after 5 near airline collisions

Video

  NTSB head on leading the ‘CSI’s of transportation’

Deborah Hersman, who runs the National Transportation Safety Board, leads the agency that travels the world investigating horrific accidents. NBC’s Tom Costello spoke with Hersman this week in Washington about her role in the office and at home, as a mother of three.

  Asiana Airlines looks to sue over fake names

After California’s KTVU aired offensive false names for the pilots of Asiana Flight 214 that they said were confirmed by the NTSB, Asiana Airlines is reportedly pursuing legal action. NBC’s Tom Costello reports.

  Apologies after on-air blunder over Asiana pilots’ names

The National Transportation Safety Board says an intern mistakenly confirmed to a TV station racially offensive fake names for the pilots of the Asiana flight that crashed in San Francisco. NBC’s Michelle Franzen reports.

  Flight attendant who helped Asiana passengers took action ‘immediately’

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board have now talked to all four of the pilots who were on board Asiana flight 214 that crashed Saturday in San Francisco. NBC’s Tom Costello reports.

  NTSB officials return to scene of 777 crash

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are interviewing the pilot who was at the controls when Asiana Flight 214 crashed. NBC’s John Yang reports.

advertisement | ad info

Related Photos

US-AVAIATION-ACCIDENT
US-AVAIATION-ACCIDENT

This image provided July 24, 2013 by the National Transportation Safety BOard shows Southwest Airlines Flight 345 sitting on runway 4 at LaGuardia Airport in the Queens borough of New York City. Eight people were injured on July 22, after the front landing gear of plane with 150 people on board coll

Handout shows a Southwest Boeing 737 aeroplane siiting on the tarmac after passengers were evacuated, at LaGuardia Airport in New York,
Handout shows a Southwest Boeing 737 aeroplane siiting on the tarmac after passengers were evacuated, at LaGuardia Airport in New York,

A Southwest Boeing 737 aeroplane sits on the tarmac after passengers were evacuated, at LaGuardia Airport in New York, in this photo courtesy of the National Transportation Safety Board made available July 23, 2013. U.S. safety investigators said July 25, 2013 that the jetliner landed on its front

Handout photo shows the charred interior cabin of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 after its crash landing in San Francisco
Handout photo shows the charred interior cabin of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 after its crash landing in San Francisco

The charred interior cabin of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 is pictured after its crash landing on Saturday in San Francisco, California, in this undated National Transportation Safety Board handout photo. REUTERS/NTSB/Handout