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Popping vitamins is common, but benefits are few

More than half of Americans take dietary supplements, with the multivitamin being the most commonly used, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Full story

Half of US adults take vitamins, says CDC

New government figures show about half of U.S. adults take vitamins and other dietary supplements — a level that's been holding steady for much of the past decade. Full story

CDC: Half of US adults take vitamins, supplements

About half of U.S. adults take vitamins and other dietary supplements — a level that's been holding steady for much of the past decade, new government figures show. Full story

Shares of GNC rise in market debut

The stock of vitamin and nutritional supplement retailer GNC rose in its market debut after the company's initial public offering raised $360 million. Full story

Radiation Worrying You? Take a Vitamin

To mitigate the effects of radiation on astronauts, doctors advise a simple measure: Take a vitamin pill. Full story

Article: Energy drinks may cause diabetes, seizures

   NBC’s chief medical editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, discusses an article by the American Academy of Pediatrics that looks into potential health hazards adolescents may face from consuming energy drinks.

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Video

  The 12 most dangerous supplements

NBC’s chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman and Nancy Metcalf of, Consumer Reports, rereveal what the publication is calling the supplement industry’s “dirty dozen,” a list of ingredients that may be linked to health risks such as heart attacks, cancer and even death.  

  Fighting malnutrition with ‘Sprinkles’

Nutritional supplements known as “Sprinkles” are helping poverty-stricken children in Guatemala survive. TODAY special correspondent and UNICEF Next Generation ambassador Jenna Bush Hager reports.

  On steroids, but unaware

Sept. 30: The Senate is investigating whether steroids are hidden in the protein powders and nutritional supplements used to bulk-up by many athletes, teens and body-builders. Dr. Nancy Snyderman talks with a panel of experts about whether you could be taking steroids and not know it.

  Reasons behind the Hydroxycut recall

May 8: The FDA recently recalled Hydroxycut, one of the country's most popular dietary supplements. Tom Costello explains why.

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Related Photos

Image: Multivitamins
Image: Multivitamins

EDINBURGH, UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 12: A selection of over the counter vitamin supplements is pictured on 12 July 2005. The European Court has decided to tighten rules on the sale of vitamin and minerals. It has been proposed tol ban up to 200 supplements from sale and put restrictions on the upper li

The dietary supplement echinacea
The dietary supplement echinacea

The dietary supplement echinacea is displayed in a shop Monday, Dec. 20, 2010, in Seattle. The largest study of the popular herbal remedy echinacea finds it won't help you get over a cold any sooner. The study of more than 700 adults and children suggests the tiniest hint of a possible benefit, abou

John McCain
John McCain

WASHINGTON - FEBRUARY 03: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) participates in a news conference on dietary supplements, on Capitol Hill, February 3, 2010 in Washington, DC. Senator McCain discussed new legislation that would improve the Food and Drug Administration's current regulations that would ensure that

Kathy Allen
Kathy Allen

**ADVANCE FOR TUESDAY, JUNE 9** In this photo taken on April 29, 2008, dietitian Kathy Allen holds up some dietary supplements at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla. Allen says people should keep a healthy skepticism about so-called "natural" products. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)