updated 1/26/2010 5:42:14 PM ET 2010-01-26T22:42:14

Last year's $787 billion economic stimulus bill is going to be even more expensive — $75 billion more.

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That's the finding in Tuesday's Congressional Budget Office estimate of the costs of the economic stimulus bill, which mixed tax cuts and lots of spending in an effort to jump-start the economy.

The reason for the higher estimate of the recovery bill's price tag is chiefly that unemployment benefits are costing more. Plus, stimulus-subsidized bonds to pay for infrastructure projects are more popular than expected with state and local governments.

Republicans criticize the stimulus for being long on spending and short on creating jobs as promised. Democrats say it has helped keep the economy going and has produced up to 2 million jobs.

Almost half of the higher estimate, $34 billion, is because the food stamp program won't be able to take advantage of lower-than-expected inflation rates and will instead have benefits set by the stimulus bill.

The nonpartisan CBO said five programs were responsible for most of the $112 billion in stimulus spending between last February and October: Medicaid; a $250 payment to almost 53 million Social Security recipients; Pell Grants; and fiscal relief for state governments. Tax cuts added $88 billion.

The stimulus is expected to add about $400 billion to the deficit in this budget year.

Democrats are pressing for another stimulus measure and top Senate Democrats have drafted an $82.5 billion jobs plan that would help small businesses, boost spending on road construction and mass transit, and give local governments money to retain teachers.

A draft document obtained by The Associated Press proposes $20 billion for a job creation tax credit and $12.5 billion to retrofit homes and businesses to make them more energy efficient.

The House passed a so-called jobs bill last month, costing about $174 billion. That plan was heavy with safety net spending such as a six-month extension of unemployment benefits and subsidies to help the jobless buy health insurance.

Democrats claim their proposals are partly paid for by repealing $150 billion worth of Treasury Department bailout authority to claim $75 billion in budget savings. But CBO director Douglas Elmendorf said those claims are based on outdated estimates.

Since the remaining bailout money won't be used, it can't be claimed as savings, he said.

"There really isn't money there to be saved," Elmendorf said.

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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