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Video: BP sheds gaffe-prone CEO Hayward

  1. Transcript of: BP sheds gaffe-prone CEO Hayward

    MATT LAUER, co-host: Now to the fate of BP 's embattled CEO Tony Hayward . Overnight BP announced that Hayward will step down on October 1st and be replaced by an American, Robert Dudley . NBC 's Michelle Kosinski 's in Venice , Louisiana , with details on this story. Hi, Michelle.

    MICHELLE KOSINSKI reporting: Good morning, Matt. With BP 's board meeting in London , they made it official. And though Tony Hayward 's been with the company nearly 30 years, after three terrible months of the oil spill , costing the company some $30 billion in the end, he will be reassigned, saying in a statement that he'll always feel a deep responsibility regardless of where the blame is ultimately found to lie. On the bayou, a world away from the corporate boardroom, fishermen head back to work, not fishing, but cleaning up oil on the BP payroll, and openly reacting to the news of Tony Hayward 's ouster echoing his infamous own words.

    Mr. TONY HAYWARD: You know, I'd like my life back.

    Unidentified Man: Now he gets his life back. Every time he opened his mouth he shoved both feet in it.

    KOSINSKI: They've known the loss of livelihood, working in oil under broiling sun for months. So word that the CEO would soon find himself out a job spread like dispersant from Plaquemines Parish ...

    Mr. BILLY NUNGESSER (President, Plaquemines Parish): I wish him well in his retirement. I hope he'll donate some of that money to the Gulf Coast .

    KOSINSKI: ...to Pensacola.

    Unidentified Woman: Bye, Tony.

    KOSINSKI: Hayward , though, is now expected to take a position on the board of BP 's Russian joint venture with severance and pension worth reportedly up to $18 million. Tough to hear for those toiling now for BP but unsure what next.

    Mr. ANTHONY ZUPANOVIC (Fisherman): I just want to hear about rotations because I just, you know, softly saying I'm about to be laid off.

    KOSINSKI: Only hours ago in London , BP 's chairman sat down with CNBC .

    Mr. CARL-HENRIC SVANBERG (BP Chairman): Tony Hayward has done a great job for the company through his almost 30 years. He's also led an unprecedented response in the Gulf of Mexico , but it became obvious to him and to us that in order to rebuild our position, in order to rebuild our brand and reputation, we needed fresh leadership and that is why we're doing the change.

    KOSINSKI: And a mile under water, progress. Right now the well is being readied for a static kill attempt as early as Monday. The final bottom kill expected several days after that. On the surface, there's less work to do with less oil out there to skim. However, that great clear view from above isn't necessarily what those on the front lines, like fisherman Brian Scherrman , now tasked with saving pelicans, are seeing.

    Mr. BRIAN SCHERRMAN: When we're out chasing the birds, we're kicking up oil and dispersant underwater everywhere. We see dead mullets on the beach, dead birds . I think it's only going to get worse from here on.

    KOSINSKI: Well, officials say, too, just because you don't see oil in a particular place doesn't mean it's not there. There seems to be a lot of oil that's unaccounted for. It's under the surface, it's in hundreds of thousands of smaller patches and sheen that can't be easily skimmed, and it's going to continue to impact shorelines for at least another month. Matt :

    LAUER: All right, Michelle . Michelle Kosinski in Venice , Louisiana , for us this morning. Thanks very much.

Photos: Month 4

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  1. The Blue Dolphin, left, and the HOS Centerline, the ships supplying the mud for the static kill operation on the Helix Q4000, are seen delivering mud through hoses at the site of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana, on Aug. 3, 2010. In the background is the Development Driller III, which is drilling the primary relief well. (Gerald Herbert / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Eddie Forsythe and Don Rorabough dump a box of blue crabs onto a sorting table at B.K. Seafood in Yscloskey, La., on Aug. 3, 2010. The crabs were caught by fisherman Garet Mones. Commercial and recreational fishing has resumed, with some restrictions in areas that were closed by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (Chuck Cook / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Sea turtle hatchlings that emerged from eggs gathered on the northern Gulf Coast of Florida are released at Playalinda Beach on the Canaveral National Seashore near Titusville, Fla., on Aug. 2, 2010. The sea turtles were born at a Kennedy Space Center incubation site, where thousands of eggs collected from Florida and Alabama beaches along the Gulf of Mexico have been sent. (Craig Rubadoux / Florida Today via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. A crab, covered with oil, walks along an oil absorbent boom near roso-cane reeds at the South Pass of the Mississippi River in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana on Aug. 1, 2010. BP is testing the well to see if it can withstand a "static kill" which would close the well permanently. (Pool / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. A boat motors through a sunset oil sheen off East Grand Terre Island, where the Gulf of Mexico meets Barataria Bay on the La. coast, on the evening of July 31. (Gerald Herbert / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Oil approaches a line of barges and boom positioned to protect East Grand Terre Island, partially seen at top right, on July 31. (Gerald Herbert / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is seen near an unprotected island in the Gulf of Mexico near Timbalier Bay, off the coast of Louisiana on Wednesday, July 28. (Gerald Herbert / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Greenpeace activists stand outside a BP gas station in London, England, on July 27 after they put up a fence to cut off access. Several dozen BP stations in London were temporarily shut down to protest the Gulf spill. (Leon Neal / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. James Wilson sells T-shirts to those arriving in Grand Isle, La., for the music festival Island Aid 2010 on July 24. (Dave Martin / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Activists covered in food coloring made to look like oil protest BP's Gulf oil spill in Mexico City on July 22. The sign at far left reads in Spanish "Petroleum kills animals." (Alexandre Meneghini / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. People in Lafayette, La., wear "Keep Drilling" tee shirts at the "Rally for Economic Survival" opposing the federal ban on deepwater drilling in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, July 21. Supporters at the rally want President Obama to lift the moratorium immediately to protect Louisiana's jobs and economy. (Ann Heisenfelt / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. A flock of white ibis lift off from marsh grass on Dry Bread Island in St. Bernard Parish, La., July 21. Crews found about 130 dead birds and 15 live birds affected by oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on July 19 in the eastern part of the parish behind the Chandeleur Islands. (Patrick Semansky / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Kenneth Feinberg, administrator of the BP Oil Spill Victim Compensation Fund testifies during a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee on July 21 in Washington, D.C. The hearing was to examine the claim process for victims of the Gulf Coast oil spill. (Alex Wong / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. An American white pelican has its wings checked during a physical examination at Brookfield Zoo’s Animal Hospital by Michael Adkesson and Michael O’Neill on July 21. The bird, along with four other pelicans, was rescued from the Gulf Coast oil spill and will be placed on permanent exhibit at the zoo. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Native people of the Gwich'in Nation form a human banner on the banks of the Porcupine River near Ft. Yukon, Alaska July 21, in regard to the BP oil spill with a message to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil development. The images include a Porcupine caribou antler and a threatened Yukon River Salmon. (Camila Roy / Spectral Q via Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. Image:
    Gerald Herbert / AP
    Above: Slideshow (15) Oil spill disaster in the Gulf - Month 4
  2. Image: Economic And Environmental Impact Of Gulf Oil Spill Deepens
    Mario Tama / Getty Images
    Slideshow (64) Oil spill disaster in the Gulf - Month 3
  3. Image: Oil Spill In The Gulf
    Digitalglobe / Getty Images Contributor
    Slideshow (81) Oil spill disaster in the Gulf - Month 2
  4. Image: Dispersed oil caught in the wake of a transport boat floats on the Gulf of Mexico
    Hans Deryk / Reuters
    Slideshow (53) Oil spill disaster in the Gulf - Month 1
  5. Image:
    Gerald Herbert / AP
    Slideshow (10) Oil spill disaster in the Gulf - Rig explosion

Data: A look at British Petroleum

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