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Iraq war logs in Manning case 'hit us in the face:' U.S. officer

FORT MEADE, Maryland (Reuters) - The U.S. Army was overwhelmed when WikiLeaks published more than 700,000 secret diplomatic and war documents handed over by soldier Bradley Manning, a retired officer testified in the sentencing phase of the convicted private's court-martial.Full story

Manning changed data access protocol, U.S. argues at sentencing

FORT MEADE, Maryland (Reuters) - As a military judge considered sentencing for convicted U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, prosecutors argued that his leaks of classified information to the WikiLeaks website changed the way the military allowed intelligence analysts to access data. Full story

Bradley Manning awaits sentencing

  The former Army private faces 136 years in prison after being convicted of espionage, leaking classified information, and other charges. NBC’s Jim Miklaszewski reports.

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Articles

Analysis: Manning damage has fallen well short of worst U.S. fears

Manning acquitted of aiding enemy, still may face long jail term

Manning found not guilty of aiding the enemy

Factbox: Quotes from the Bradley Manning WikiLeaks court-martial

Verdict to be read on Tuesday for U.S. soldier in WikiLeaks case

Verdict likely Tuesday in WikiLeaks court-martial

Verdict in Bradley Manning WikiLeaks case to be read on Tuesday

Verdict in Bradley Manning Wikileaks case to be read on Tuesday

Judge deliberates in GI's WikiLeaks trial

U.S. WikiLeaks soldier is whistleblower, not traitor -defense

Video

  Bradley Manning’s supporters relieved over verdict

The 25-year-old Army Private was found not guilty of  aiding the enemy. NOW’s Alex Wagner discusses the verdict with radio host Kurt Andersen, Demos’ Heather McGhee, Wikileaks attorney Michael Ratner, Mother Jones’ David Corn, and former Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, P.J. Crowley.

  Manning leaks had significant impact

Melissa Harris-Perry reports on the verdict in the military trial of Bradley Manning and the quantity of now widely known stories that were reported as a result of Manning's Wikileaks documents.

  Does Manning verdict set dangerous precedent?

MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell talks to The Atlantic's Steve Clemons about the Bradley Manning verdict and what it means for Edward Snowden, journalists and future leakers.

  Bradley Manning found not guilty of aiding the enemy charge

On Tuesday a judge convicted Bradley Manning of 20 of the government's 22 charges. Chris Hayes discusses the ruling with Elizabeth Goitein.

  Manning 'not guilty' of aiding enemy

US Army Pfc Bradley Manning is found "not guilty" of aiding the enemy in the Wikileaks case. However, he was found guilty on multiple counts of violating the Espionage Act.

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Related Photos

Sunshine Press Productions photo of WikiLeaks publisher and editor-in-chief Julian Assange in London
Sunshine Press Productions photo of WikiLeaks publisher and editor-in-chief Julian Assange in London

WikiLeaks publisher and editor-in-chief Julian Assange talks to reporters in London after the verdict of Bradley Manning in this Sunshine Press Productions picture released on July 30, 2013. A military judge on Tuesday found U.S. soldier Bradley Manning not guilty of aiding the enemy, the most serio

A supporter of U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning gestures outside the courthouse at Fort Meade, Maryland
A supporter of U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning gestures outside the courthouse at Fort Meade, Maryland

A supporter of U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning gestures outside the courthouse at Fort Meade, Maryland July 30, 2013. A military judge on Tuesday found Manning not guilty of aiding the enemy - the most serious charge among many he faced for handing over documents to WikiLeaks. But Col.

The uniform, handcuffs, nametag and service ribbons of U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning are seen as he departs the courthouse at Fort Meade, Maryland
The uniform, handcuffs, nametag and service ribbons of U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning are seen as he departs the courthouse at Fort Meade, Maryland

The uniform, handcuffs, nametag and service ribbons of U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning are seen as he departs the courthouse at Fort Meade, Maryland July 30, 2013. A military judge on Tuesday found Manning not guilty of aiding the enemy - the most serious charge among many he faced for