updated 1/5/2004 10:28:15 PM ET 2004-01-06T03:28:15

An Alabama prosecutor is seeking a second capital murder trial for convicted Washington-area sniper Lee Boyd Malvo and has requested the teen be moved there from Virginia.

In a letter to Virginia Gov. Mark Warner, Montgomery County District Attorney Ellen Brooks said Alabama has a strong case against Malvo, a tested death penalty law and should be one of the next jurisdictions to try him.

A jury in Virginia last month convicted Malvo, who was 17 at the time of the shootings, of capital murder in a sniper slaying in that state, but spared his life and sentenced him to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

His accomplice, John Muhammad, was convicted of capital murder by a different Virginia jury and sentenced to death. Muhammad and Malvo have been charged in the three-week sniper spree that terrorized the Washington area and left 10 people dead in the fall of 2002.

Malvo and Muhammad are also charged with capital murder in Montgomery for the Sept. 21, 2002, shooting outside a liquor store that killed the manager and critically injured another employee.

'Willing and able to prosecute'
Brooks, who earlier sent a similar letter saying she wanted to try Muhammad, said as soon as Malvo’s Virginia trial ended she began efforts to let Virginia authorities know “we were willing and able to prosecute Malvo.”

“I wanted to make sure the governor and attorney general and anyone else were aware of the abilities of our office, our laws and strength of our evidence,” Brooks said.

Brooks said it is up to Virginia authorities, who have several cases against the two men, to decide where Malvo goes next.

Kellie Adams, the employee injured in the Montgomery attack, has said she doesn’t see a reason to try Muhammad in Alabama, since he has already been sentenced to death. But she said Monday she would not mind seeing Malvo tried in Alabama “if they can get the death penalty.”

In all, Malvo and Muhammad have been linked to 20 shootings, including 13 deaths in Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana and Washington, D.C.

© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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