Protesters turned out in huge numbers in Cairo's Tahrir Square again Tuesday, proving that they still have momentum even after two weeks of steadfast pressure have not achieved their goal of ousting Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak.

As the standoff between the protesters and Mubarak's regime continues, NBC News' correspondent Ron Allen responded to reader questions from Cairo about the ongoing demonstrations and what to watch for next.

Allen has covered conflict situations across the globe for NBC for the last decade. He has been reporting on the protests in Cairo and Alexandria since they began over two weeks ago.

This chat is now over, but you can click to replay it below. Thanks

Follow developments in Egypt in msnbc's World Blog. 

Live Chat with NBC's Ron Allen in Cairo

Video: Peaceful stalemate continues in Cairo

  1. Closed captioning of: Peaceful stalemate continues in Cairo

    >>> hundreds of thousands of people have now gathered for one of the largest rallies yet in cairo 's main square . renewing pressure on president mubarak . meanwhile, vice president biden reached out again to his counterpart, vice president suleiman today, to go over the precise steps that the u.s. wants to see to make sure that the reform process is credible. we just heard from white house press secretary , robert gibbs , who said the president's focus is on those reforms and he has no stay on whether mubarak stays in power. nbc's ron allen is live in cairo . tell us about the crowds that are gathering there.

    >> it was a big day here, andrea . the crowds were larger than they had been over the weekend. and larger than they had been in some time. the protesters had asked for a million people to come out today and i'm not sure if they got to that number. but it was really quite a crowd. and you could feel the energy. and it felt different than many other days. you know, i should say that it's very peaceful there. it's very festive there. there's not the tension that existed a week or so ago when all of this was gathering momentum. things have settled into a pattern. the military have areas cordoned off and blocked off. there are tanks blocking many of the main streets . there are checkpoints and areas where you can come in. it's an orderly process, people come and go during the day and into the night . there are nonstop political events and rallies and other things to entertain people. and it's become something of a, a permanent part of the heart of cairo . there's no indication that this is going anywhere any time soon. and it's a protest site, but it's not just that it's not just a sit-in, it's not a camp. it's something that's very unique, i think. it's hard to think of another situation that's been quite like it. and again, it has this air of permanence about it meanwhile, the political process continues. were you talking about the discussions between the vice president here and vice president biden in the united states . there are have also been discussions going on with opposition figures. and that whole process seems to be dragging on and going at a very deliberate, slow process, grinding out. and that could go on for some time. the bottom line is that it feels like there's a bit of a stalemate, a bit of a standoff going on here. that's peaceful and that the two sides have sort of settled into their positions. and this could go on for some time without a clear sharp break or resolution. for some time to come. andrea ?

    >> robert gibbs has briefed this morning, has briefed this afternoon, and they're saying that the egyptian government has to do more to stop harassing the protesters. they've made a very strong appeal now. and trying, i think to reinforce what they claim is the reality, that they are really pressing egypt hard. despite rors, most recently in the "new york times," that they're siding for stability and trying to slow-walk the process. what's the perception there? is there a perception among the reformers and the protesters that the u.s. is letting them down in some way?

    >> yes. letting them down in a big way. yeah. there's no doubt about that. people you talk to in the square feel like the obama administration has really let them down. there was a guy holding a sign today that i saw that said, yes, we can. and back to the obama campaign . and people feel that the administration has given hosni mubarak , a green light to stay in power. and that again, that's the bottom-line demand of the protesters out there. it's a very clear, obvious thing. don't want to hear about these discussions. they don't want to hear about the plans for a gradual transition. they want to see mubarak go. that's clearly not happening. that's a source of huge frustration, dare i say anger that the protesters have about the united states . clearly, the other thing is that this is really not about the united states . so much of this is about what's going on in this country. while people are mindful of what the u.s. is doing, it's not a big, big issue in the square. in the square, it's about the people and their government. and that's what this revolution is, they call it is about more so than anything else. andrea ?

    >> ron, just do recapitulate, what robert gibbs has said so far is egypt should stop harassing protesters and journalists and release those who have been detained. do we still know of journalists who have been detained, along with protesters?

    >> there are a number of journalists who are missing who have been detained. the committee to protect journalism and other organizations had a list some dime ago of about two dozen people. i'm not quite sure where the list stands right now. in terms of, in terms of the harassment of journalists doing their job, we're able to move around somewhat freely. but this is a country where even during the best of times, it was difficult to go into some areas where you weren't welcome. where the authorities didn't want you taking pictures or interviewing people in areas where the story might reflect negatively on the country. so there's still that. but there's not a lot of cases of reporters being beaten or shot at or killed although there was the shooting of a reporter last friday. i believe it was. but those incidents are not as, as dominant as they were some time ago. part of the, again, what i call the new normal here. but of course something, things are different here than they've ever been before. andrea ?

    >> rob allen. and thank you for all of your reporting, you and richard engel and the whole team, extraordinary work,

Photos: Farewell Friday

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  1. Anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation in Cairo on Feb. 11. (Dylan Martinez / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Egyptians set off fireworks as they celebrate in Cairo’s Tahrir Square after President Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military. (Khalil Hamra / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. President Barack Obama makes a statement on the resignation of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak in the Grand Foyer at the White House in Washington D.C. (Carolyn Kaster / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Egyptians celebrate in Tahrir Square after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military on Friday. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday. (Khalil Hamra / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Protesters walk over a barricade after it was taken down to allow free entry to hundreds of thousands of Egyptians in Tahrir Square in Cairo February 11, 2011. A furious wave of protest finally swept Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak from power, sending a warning to autocrats across the Arab world and beyond. (Yannis Behrakis / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. A spokesman for Egypt's higher military council reads a statement titled “Communiqué No. 3” in this video still on Friday. Egypt's higher military council said it would announce measures for a transitional phase after President Hosni Mubarak stepped down. (Reuters Tv / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Egyptian celebrates in Cairo after the announcement of President Mubarak's resignation. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Mubarak's resignation in Cairo on Friday. A furious wave of protest finally swept Mubarak from power after 30 years of one-man rule, sparking jubilation in the streets. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. An Egyptian reacts in the street after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military in Cairo, Egypt, on Friday, Feb. 11. (Amr Nabil / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Thousands of Egyptian anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation on Friday. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Egyptian soldiers celebrate with anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on Friday. Cairo's streets exploded in joy when Mubarak stepped down after three-decades of autocratic rule and handed power to a junta of senior military commanders. (Marco Longari / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation in Cairo on Friday. (Dylan Martinez / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Egyptians celebrate the news of Mubarak's resignation in Tahrir Square on Friday. (Tara Todras-whitehill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. An Egyptian woman cries as she celebrates the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country to the military, Friday night, in Tahrir Square, Cairo. (Tara Todras-whitehill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Egyptian anti-government protesters celebrate minutes after the announcement on television of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday. Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak had resigned. (Khaled Elfiqi / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Opposition protesters celebrate Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak's resignation, in Tahrir Square on Friday. President Mubarak bowed to pressure from the street and resigned, handing power to the army. (Suhaib Salem / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. Anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Mubarak's resignation in Cairo on Friday. (Dylan Martinez / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. On Egyptian state television, Al-Masriya, Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman delivers an address announcing that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has stepped down, in Cairo on Friday. (TV via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. Image: Anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation in Cairo
    Dylan Martinez / Reuters
    Above: Slideshow (18) Egypt's Mubarak steps down - Farewell Friday
  2. Image: Protester in Tahrir Square
    Emilio Morenatti / AP
    Slideshow (61) Egypt's Mubarak steps down - Week 3
  3. Image: Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters
    Amr Nabil / AP
    Slideshow (93) Egypt's Mubarak steps down - Week 2
  4. Image: Mohamed ElBaradei
    Khalil Hamra / AP
    Slideshow (83) Egypt's Mubarak steps down - Week 1
  5. Image:
    Mayra Beltran / AP
    Slideshow (17) Egypt's Mubarak steps down - World reacts

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