Image: U.S. Lt. Gen. William Caldwell
Dar Yasin  /  AP
Lt. Gen. William Caldwell ordered a specialized "psychological operations" team to manipulate dignitaries visiting Afghanistan and convince them to boost funding and troop numbers, Rolling Stone reports.
msnbc.com
updated 2/24/2011 12:57:40 PM ET 2011-02-24T17:57:40

The U.S. army reportedly deployed a specialized "psychological operations" team in 2009 to help convince American legislators to boost funding and troop numbers for the war in Afghanistan.

Lt. Gen. William Caldwell, a three-star general in charge of training Afghan troops, ordered the operation, Rolling Stone Magazine reported in a story published late on Wednesday.

An officer in charge of the unit objected when he was ordered to pressure the visiting senators and was harshly reprimanded by superiors, according to the magazine.

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"My job in psy-ops is to play with people's heads, to get the enemy to behave the way we want them to behave," the officer, Lt. Colonel Michael Holmes, told Rolling Stone.

"I'm prohibited from doing that to our own people. When you ask me to try to use these skills on senators and congressman, you're crossing a line," he added.

Gen. David Petraeus has called for an investigation into charges, NBC News reported.

On the msnbc's "Morning Joe" program Thursday, NBC News Senior Pentagon Correspondent Jim Miklaszewski reported that officials both in Washington and Afghanistan had been "scrambling" to come up with a response to the allegations.

Miklaszewski also pointed out that using such tactics on U.S. citizens is against regulations and not to be done under any circumstances.

Among those targeted were senators John McCain, Joe Lieberman, Jack Reed, Al Franken and Carl Levin, as well as Representative Steve Israel of the House Appropriations Committee, the report said. The team also allegedly targeted Admiral Mike Mullen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Video: Officer on psy-ops order: ‘We weren’t gonna do it’ (on this page)

Levin pointed out Thursday that he has long been in favor of building up Afghan forces.

"For years, I have strongly and repeatedly advocated for building up Afghan military capability because I believe only the Afghans can truly secure their nation's future," Levin said in a statement. "I have never needed any convincing on this point. Quite the opposite, my efforts have been aimed at convincing others of the need for larger, more capable Afghan security forces, and that we and NATO should send more trainers to Afghanistan, rather than more combat troops."

'Very serious and disturbing'
One of the lawmakers, Sen. Reed, told msnbc's Chris Jansing that he found the accusations "very serious and disturbing" and said the Pentagon should investigate, and if warranted, punish those involved.

The Rhode Island Democrat, who is a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee and a former U.S. Army Ranger, said he's been to Afghanistan 11 times and has tried to get a "broad view" of the situation on the ground by seeking out many different sources.

He said he never detected anything unusual when speaking to military personnel, but stressed that he weighs carefully what everyone has told him and doesn't put too much stock into any one individual.

According to Holmes, he and his four-man team arrived in Afghanistan at the end of 2009 in order to determine the effects of American propaganda on Afghans and the Taliban, the magazine reported.

Soon, though, Caldwell ordered the unit to gather profiles of visiting dignitaries, including their likes and dislikes and "hot-button issues," the magazine reported.

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Holmes was asked how the general could secretly manipulate the lawmakers, Rolling Stone said.

"How do we get these guys to give us more people?" Caldwell asked, according to the magazine. "What do I have to plant inside their heads?"

U.S. law bars the military from using psy-ops on Americans, and every defense authorization bill explicitly prohibits the manipulation, the magazine reported.

"Everyone in the psy-ops, intel ... knows you're not supposed to target Americans," a veteran member of similar team told Rolling Stone. "It's what you learn on day one."

© 2013 msnbc.com Reprints

Video: Officer on psy-ops order: ‘We weren’t gonna do it’

Photos: Life at Kandahar Airfield

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  1. U.S. Airman toss a football on Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, on Sunday, Aug. 1. The airfield is the largest military base in southern Afghanistan and has a population of some 20,000 soldiers and civilians. It includes many of the services of a small American city. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. The boundary of the Kandahar Airfield is lined with a barricade and a razor wire fence. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. A dusty tent houses Canadian troops at Kandahar Airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Troops and civilians eat lunch inside one of the dining facilities, called "Chow Hall", at the airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. A U.S soldier raises his hands during a gospel service at Kandahar Airfield on Sunday, Aug. 1. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. A U.S Airman receives communion during a Catholic mass at the airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. A map of Kandahar Airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Troops work out in a gym on the base on Saturday, July 31. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Contractors from developing countries, including Bangladesh, Sri Lanka ,India and the Philippines, sort laundry at the airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. A merchant displays digital cameras for sale inside the "PX", a large store catering to the needs of combat troops and civilians who live on the airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. The interior of a store that sells textiles on Kandahar Airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Airman eat dinner in a T.G.I. Friday's restaurant located on the base. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Troops relax while playing video games in a recreation room on Kandahar Airfield on Saturday, July 31. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. Troops and civilians dance to salsa on Kandahar Airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Troops play summer hockey on a rink on the base. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Chairs inside a concrete bunker on Kandahar Airfield. (Rodrigo Abd / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. Image:
    Rodrigo Abd / AP
    Above: Slideshow (16) Life at Kandahar Airfield
  2. Image: AFGHANISTAN-UNREST-SOCIETY
    Massoud Hossaini / AFP - Getty Images
    Slideshow (80) Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads - 2013
  3. Image: AFGHANISTAN-PAKISTAN-BORDER
    Noorullah Shirzada / AFP - Getty Images
    Slideshow (139) Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads - 2012
  4. Image:
    Rahmat Gul / AP
    Slideshow (234) Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads - 2011
  5. Image:
    Altaf Qadri / AP
    Slideshow (158) Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads - 2010
  6. Image: U.S. army soldiers from Task Force Denali 1-40 Cav reposition a 105mm Howitzer during snowfall at FOB Wilderness in Paktya province
    Zohra Bensemra / Reuters
    Slideshow (88) Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads - 2009: Troops
  1. Image: Afghan protesters shout slogans during a protest in Kabul
    Ahmad Masood / Reuters
    Slideshow (31) Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads - 2009: Civilians
  2. Image: Afghan Land Mine Victims Pose For Portraits
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    Slideshow (13) Scars of war: Mine victims

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