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Long Before Birds, Dinosaur Brains Wired for Flight

Some nonavian dinosaurs, including carnivorous tyrannosaurs, may have had brains that were hardwired for flight long before even the earliest known birds started flapping their wings, a new study finds. Full story

Natalie: We need to crack down on texting and driving

   With reports indicating that the driver in the horrific train crash in Spain was on the phone when the train derailed, the TODAY anchors discuss how we can prevent people from using cellphones while driving. They also chat about other topics making headlines.

Kristin Scott Thomas on aging: ‘I feel invisible’

   TODAY’s Natalie Morales and Al Roker, along with guest anchor Carson Daly, chat about the hot topics of the day, including Kristin Scott Thomas’s candid remarks on being an older actress.

Turkey frees bird accused of spying for Israel

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkish authorities detained a bird on suspicion it was spying for Israel, but freed it after X-rays showed it was not embedded with surveillance equipment, newspapers said on Friday. Full story

Tropic bird goes astray, sparks NM birding frenzy

There's a frenzy erupting in the birding world, and the Rufous-necked wood-rail is to blame. Full story

Feds say falcons recovered; no more chick rescues

After decades of scrambling on the underside of California bridges to pluck endangered peregrine falcon chicks from ill-placed nests, inseminating female birds and releasing captive-raised fledglings, wildlife biologists have been so successful in bringing back the powerful raptors that they now thr Full story

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Articles

Now and Later: 7/17/13

South Carolina D.H.E.C Wants You to Pick Up Dead Birds

Japan PM Abe hops and flips in voter-wooing game app

New Noisy Bird Discovered in Busy City

Fowl 'Facebook' Tracks Birds for Science

Ancient Dinobird Wore Black and White

How Birds Lost Their Penises

Why Women May Be Better at Remembering Faces

New Feathered Dino May Be World's First Bird

Deforestation Plants the Seed for Rapid Evolution in Brazil

Video

  Top Lines: Bachmann, Ron Burgundy, Limbaugh, Christie and Cruz

Jay Leno asks Michele Bachmann about “pray the gay away”; Ron Burgundy celebrates Bachmman’s retirement; Rush Limbaugh talks about the Obama/Christie “master” and “servant” act; and Ted Cruz praises wacko birds in today’s “Top Lines.”

  Bird Flu Fears Hit Wall St.

Morgan Stanley is moving a hedge fund meeting out of China after a new drug resistant bird flu strain causes 36 deaths, reports CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera.

  Fast-talking parakeet shows off his vocal skills

The TODAY anchors chat about the hot topics of the day and meet a parakeet named Disco, whose amazing verbal talents made him a viral video star.

  Sara has a hoot visiting hawks, owls, eagles

TODAY’s Sara Haines visits the Center for Birds of Prey in Charleston, which rehabilitates more than 500 injured birds per year and helps them heal before releasing them back into wild.

  How to get greener grass

Lou Manfredini, host of “House Smarts,” shows how to make your lawn the envy of the neighborhood and increase your property value by 10 to 15 percent at the same time.

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Related Photos

File photo of a McDonalds sign in Arundel Mills Maryland
File photo of a McDonalds sign in Arundel Mills Maryland

Birds sit atop a McDonald's sign in Arundel Mills, Maryland in this March 8, 2013 file photo. McDonald's Corp warned that full-year results would be "challenged" in the face of falling sales in Europe, its biggest market, and growing competition from smaller fast-food rivals in the United States.

Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, has a bird perched on his hand at his home in Sanaa
Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, has a bird perched on his hand at his home in Sanaa

Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, has a bird perched on his hand at his home in Sanaa July 18, 2013. Al-Hubaishi began building bird houses at his home from the age of ten, and since then has been breeding doves and providing food for visiting birds out of his love for them. He takes care of about 200 birds at

Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, holds a bird at his home in Sanaa
Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, holds a bird at his home in Sanaa

Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, holds a bird at his home in Sanaa July 18, 2013. Al-Hubaishi began building bird houses at his home from the age of ten, and since then has been breeding doves and providing food for visiting birds out of his love for them. He takes care of about 200 birds at his home. REUTERS

Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, stands near birds at his home in Sanaa
Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, stands near birds at his home in Sanaa

Osama Al-Hubaishi, 22, stands near birds at his home in Sanaa July 18, 2013. Al-Hubaishi began building bird houses at his home from the age of ten, and since then has been breeding doves and providing food for visiting birds out of his love for them. He takes care of about 200 birds at his home. RE