Image: Ted Kaczynski in 1994
AP
Ted Kaczynski, seen here in 1994, is serving life without the possibility of parole in a federal prison after pleading guilty in 1998 to setting 16 explosions that killed three people.
msnbc.com staff and news service reports
updated 5/13/2011 5:43:01 AM ET 2011-05-13T09:43:01

The manifesto and other items belonging to the man known as the "Unabomber" will soon be available for purchase, the government announced Thursday.

The infamous manifesto, in which Ted Kaczynski condemned the industrial and technological revolutions, will be offered in an online government auction from May 18 through June 2, the U.S. Marshals Service said in a statement.

The auction offering will include more than 20,000 pages of written documents, including the original handwritten and typewritten versions of the manifesto. Personal documents including Kaczynski's birth certificate, photos, handwritten notes, driver's licenses, deeds, checks, academic transcripts will also be up for auction.

The items were seized during a search of Kaczynski's cabin in the Montana woods following his capture in 1996.

'Hardships'
U.S. District Judge Garland Burrell ordered the sale in August. Proceeds from the auction will be used to compensate Kaczynski's victims, the U.S. Marshals Service said.

"The U.S. Marshals Service has been given a unique opportunity to help the victims of Theodore Kaczynski's horrific crimes," said U.S. Marshal Albert Nájera of the Eastern District of California. "We will use the technology that Kaczynski railed against in his various manifestos to sell artifacts of his life. The proceeds will go to his victims and, in a very small way, offset some of the hardships they have suffered."

Photos of some of the lots available for auction have also been posted online.

Kaczynski, 69, is serving life without the possibility of parole in a federal prison after pleading guilty in 1998 to setting 16 explosions that killed three people, including two in Sacramento, Calif., and injured 23 others in various parts of the country.

The Harvard-trained mathematician railed against the effects of advanced technology and led authorities on the nation's longest and costliest manhunt before his brother tipped off law enforcement.

The Associated Press and msnbc.com staff contributed to this report.

Video: Unabomber's brother on U.S. prisons

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