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  Bees on a plane! Flight delayed while insects removed

Bees delay US Airways Express flight from NC

A US Airways Express flight left three hours late from a North Carolina airport after a swarm of bees kept crews from rolling the plane back from the gate. Full story

Tucson man OK after bee attack

TUCSON - A man is OK after a bee attack Monday. The man and his dog were stung by a hive at his home neat Camino de la Tierra, Northwest Fire said. Full story

Return of long-absent bumblebee near Seattle stirs scientific buzz

OLYMPIA, Washington (Reuters) - A North American bumblebee species that all but vanished from about half of its natural range has re-emerged in Washington state, delighting scientists who voiced optimism the insect might eventually make a recovery in the Pacific Northwest. Full story

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Articles

Honey Bee Population on the Decline in Texoma

Honeycombs' Surprising Secret Revealed

Buzz in NYC? Hobbyists Swarm to Beekeeping

Antenna Antics: Honeybees Are 'Righties'

Urban Bees For Hire: A Thriving Hive Business

Arizona climber and his dog apparently stung to death by bees

Best Rx for Bees? Their Own Honey

UK designers Westwood, Hamnett join campaign to save bees

Rooftop beehives create buzz above French parliament

Surprisingly Simple Logic Explains Amazing Bee Abilities

Video

  Abandon house now home to huge bee hive

A massive bee hive on the side of an abandoned house in Florida has neighbors buzzing. Claire Metz of WESH reports.

  Bees attack, kill 62-year-old man

A Texas man is dead, and two his neighbors are hospitalized after being attacked by bees. KCEN's Chris Davis reports.

  May 6: Nightly News Monday broadcast

Limo survivor recounts horrific fire; Syria’s regime increasingly intertwined with Hezbollah; New witnesses to testify on Benghazi deaths; Air Force sex assault prevention chief charged with sexual battery; Friend of Boston bombing suspect released from prison; Newtown heroes honored with Citizen Ho

  Bee shortage threatens farmland

Mites, diseases, and pesticides are all suspected of contributing to bee colony collapse disorder. The bees are dying at such a fast rate that farmers who rely on bees for pollination are now reserving them five years in advance. NBC’s Anne Thompson reports.

  ‘It’s a huge hit economically to not have those bees’ 

Brett Adee is owner of the largest commercial beekeeping operation in the country. He has seen a dramatic drop-off in his bees and worries about the future of his business.

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Related Photos

A bee collects nectar from a sunflower on a field near the Austrian village of Matzendorf
A bee collects nectar from a sunflower on a field near the Austrian village of Matzendorf

A bee collects nectar from a sunflower on a field near the village of Matzendorf about 50 km south of Austria's capital Vienna July 26, 2013. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

USDA photo of the western bumble bee Bombus occidentalis
USDA photo of the western bumble bee Bombus occidentalis

The western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis, is seen in this undated U.S. Department of Agriculture photo. A North American bumblebee species that had all but vanished from the western half of its natural range since the late 1990s has suddenly reappeared in Washington state, officially photographed

USDA photo of the western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis
USDA photo of the western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis

The western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis, is shown in this undated U.S. Department of Agriculture photo. A North American bumblebee species that had all but vanished from the western half of its natural range since the late 1990s has suddenly reappeared in Washington state, officially photographe

A bumble bee searches for pollen during a spring day in New York
A bumble bee searches for pollen during a spring day in New York

A bumble bee searches for pollen during a spring day in New York, May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid