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Photos: Islam in America

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  1. Sin City may seem like a strange place for a mosque, but the Islamic Society of Nevada is one of at least six in Las Vegas. Here, Naim Shah Jr., Dr. Aslam Abdullah, head of the ISN, and Imam Fateen Seifullah have a discussion in the parking lot of the mosque, the only one in the city with a traditional minaret. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. A woman wearing the traditional and conservative Muslim veil called a niqab crosses a street in uptown Manhattan. The wearing of the veils is based on a section of the Quran, Islam's holy book, instructing men and women to dress modestly. For women, that is generally interpreted as requiring them to cover everything except their face, hands and feet when in the presence of men they are not related to or married to. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Marwan Kamel, left, and Sahar Abu Saqer discuss a new song that they plan to play at their next show in Chicago. Both Kamel, who is of Syrian descent, and Saqer, who is of Palestinian descent, are Muslim Americans and members of the Al Thawra ("The Revolution" in Arabic), a punk band, and are both practicing Muslims. They are part of a burgeoning Islamic punk rock scene devoted to creating music related to Islam and the Middle East. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Marwan Kamel, leader of the Muslim punk band Al Thawra, performs the Maghreb prayer at the Islamic Community Center of Chicago. This prayer ends the fasting day during the holy month of Ramadan. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. The top of New York's iconic Empire State Building is lit with green lights to honor the Muslim holiday of Eid, the biggest festival on the Muslim calendar, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. "The lighting will become an annual event in the same tradition of the yearly lightings for Christmas and Hannukah," according to a statement from the city issued in 2007, the first year the building was illuminated for Eid. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Shiite and Sunni Muslims protest against terrorism in Washington, D.C., denouncing countries like Saudi Arabia for sponsoring fundamentalist groups in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sunni and Shia Islam are the two major denominations of Islam, and members hold different religious beliefs, practices, traditions and customs. Relations between the two have been marked by both cooperation and conflict, often with deadly violence. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Imams and rabbis from the largest cities in the U.S. share a bus in midtown Manhattan during the National Summit of Imams and Rabbis, an event jointly organized by the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding (FFEU) and the Islamic Cultural Center of New York. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Worshippers attend a reading at the Al-Hikmah mosque in Queens, N.Y. The mosque is predominately attended by Muslims of Indonesian descent. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Shimon Ibn Ibrahim photographs a Yemeni woman during a Thanksgiving celebration on Long Island, N.Y., at the home of Hofstra University Professor Dan Varisco. Ibrahim, who was raised by his adoptive parents as a Hassidic Jew, was attending his first Thanksgiving after converting to Islam. At the celebration, he met other Muslims from Lebanon, Turkey, Yemen, Indonesia and Iraq. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Mohamed Al Thaibani, who immigrated to the U.S. from Yemen, stands in his living room in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a portrait from his youth and other traditional furniture from Yemen in the background. Sixty-five percent of American Muslims are foreign-born, according to the Pew Research Center. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. A Muslim woman with dual U.S. and Yemeni citizenship protests against Yemen’s government outside the United Nations headquarters in New York City on Nov. 30, 2007. The woman was part of a group of Yemenis from the southern part of the country protesting what they say is unequal treatment by the government in the north. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Each Saturday, Shamse Ali, an imam at the 96th Street Mosque in New York City, teaches classes for new converts to Islam. Islam is the fastest growing religion in the U.S., with 21 percent of American Muslims being converts to the religion, according to the Pew Research Center. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Ahmed Nasser, a New York Police Department community affairs officer, talks to a colleague in the basement of a police station. Nasser, a police detective of Yemeni descent, produced a movie intended to familiarize NYPD officers with the religion. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. Saira Farooqui and Nausheen Ansari, two friends of Pakistani descent, shop together in New York City’s Soho district. Both were born and raised in the U.S. Though they are practicing Muslims, they don't usually cover up, but they do try to pray five times a day, as is called for in the Quran. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Sadam Ali trains at a gym on New York's Coney Island. Born in Brooklyn of Yemeni parents, Sadam represented the USA at the 2008 Beijing Olympics as a member of the U.S. boxing team. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Kareem Salama, born of Egyptian parents, is a Muslim country singer originally from Oklahoma, He carries his guitar as he leaves his parents’ home in Richmond, Texas. (Karim Ben Khelifa) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. ISLAM IN THE USA
    Karim Ben Khelifa
    Above: Slideshow (16) The many faces of Islam in America
  2. Jim Seida / msnbc.com
    Slideshow (6) Free speech or hate speech?

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