Image: A displaced woman lifts water off her child's back
Schalk Van Zuydam  /  AP
A displaced woman, right, lifts water off her child's back after she returned from a well some distance from their home in the town of Dadaab, Kenya, on July 30. More than 11 million people are estimated to need help as a result of East Africa's worst drought in 60 years in Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Eritrea and South Sudan.
By
updated 7/31/2011 10:51:20 AM ET 2011-07-31T14:51:20

Refugee Barwago Mohamud huddles silently beneath a few blankets stretched over sticks at night, fearing for her life after a neighbor was raped, and a naked woman who had been kidnapped and gang-raped for three days in front of her terrified children was delivered to the medical tent next door.

Only a few hundred feet away stands a newly built camp with a police station, toilet blocks and schools. Neat thornbush fences in the camp separate residential areas for families to move into. But all the facilities are empty. The Kenyan government is refusing to open the new Ifo 2 facility as part of the world's biggest refugee camp, Dadaab, saying the desperate Somali refugees flowing into the country are a security risk.

But for the women and children who fled war and famine and are now forced to build their shelters farther and farther away from the center of the camps, the extension would be a refuge from the armed men who prowl the bush at night. Some may be deserters from Somali forces across the border; others are Kenyan bandits who rob and gang-rape the stream of refugees fleeing the famine in Somalia.

Story: Four reasons help is slow to reach Somalia's famine victims

The contrast between the squalid, insecure outskirts of the sprawling camp and the empty, silent facilities shows how regional politics can interfere with aid efforts, causing millions of dollars to be wasted and leaving women and children vulnerable to attack.

"What can we do?" Mohamud asked. "Our neighbors have been raped at night. We are afraid. Some boys are helping watch at night in case of trouble but they also work during the day."

Mohamud and eight other women and girls share their rickety shelter on the outskirts of Dadaab, a camp designed for 90,000 people which now houses around 440,000 refugees. Almost all are from war-ravaged Somalia. Some have been here for more than 20 years, when the country first collapsed into anarchy. But now more than 1,000 are arriving daily, fleeing fighting or hunger.

The U.N. said this month that at least two regions in Somalia are suffering from famine and 11.3 million people in the Horn of Africa need aid.

To help ease the overcrowding, international donors including the U.S. and European Union spent $16 million building the Ifo 2 extension, which could house 40,000 people. But it is still unclear when or if the Kenyan government will open it.

Research shows that women are often attacked when they leave their families to go to the bathroom or gather firewood. When Mohamud's three young daughters need to relieve themselves, she insists on going with them, and takes the only torch the nine women share between them. She has no shoes, so she walks barefoot over the thorny ground.

"Women express a lot of fear about going to the bush. They say there are men with guns there," said Sinead Murray, an aid worker with the International Rescue Committee. Her organization has recorded a spike in rapes and attempted rape. Since the beginning of June, they have had double the number of attacks reported from January-May.

"More and more women are coming forward who have been raped," said Murray, who said consultations with communities show the vast majority of rapes go unreported. Women may not know where to seek help, or fear ostracism by their community.

They are women like Sahan, who was on a bus coming over from Somalia when four gunmen stopped the vehicle. The women were ordered off and raped in the bush for three hours. She has not reported the rape because she was living far away from any medical services on the outskirts of the camp and did not want to leave her family. She asked her last name not be used to protect her privacy.

A reporter for The Associated Press drove around the newly constructed area in Dadaab and found rows of new toilet blocks standing amid the rows of empty lots, where women could more safely go to the bathroom and easily walk to police or medical services if they were attacked.

The Ifo 2 camp also houses a freshly painted primary and secondary school, police station, and headquarters for aid organizations ranging from Handicap International to the Norwegian Refugee Council padlocked shut. A medical facility for Doctors Without Borders lay half-built after aid workers said they were told to stop building early this year. The group now treats people in nearby tents instead.

More than two weeks ago, Kenyan Prime Minister Raila Odinga visited Dadaab and said the Ifo 2 extension would open in 10 days. On Saturday, Kenyan government spokesman Alfred Mutua said that no decision had yet been reached.

Kenyan officials have said that they consider the influx of Somalis a security risk because part of the country is held by al-Qaida linked rebels. They also fear that if they provide the schools and medical care lacking in Somalia, families will simply move to Kenya to get better services. The Kenyans want aid agencies to deliver food in Somalia instead but charities face attack by bandits and harassment by Kenyan officials at the border.

But Somalis say they have no other choice than to flee their homes because they will be killed by gunmen or starve to death if they stay at home.

In the meantime, the refugees keep coming as the hunger crisis worsens but there is nowhere for them to go. The camps are full to bursting, and medical staff are setting up tents to treat new arrivals. Women and their children are being forced farther out, away from services and security. Aid agencies are appealing for more donations, unable to use the facilities they built. And Mohamud, whose door is only a blanket draped on a stick, keeps her daughters close and dreads each sunset.

"We are afraid," she said again, as her 13-year-old daughter played in the dirt in front of her. "Maybe they will come back. But we have nowhere else to go."

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Video: World's largest refugee outpost strained

  1. Transcript of: World's largest refugee outpost strained

    BRIAN WILLIAMS, anchor: Right now, before we get to a live satellite report from overseas, imagine if on this broadcast tonight we announced that 100 million Americans were starving. That would make it roughly a third of our population, and that's what officially qualifies as a famine. Well, it's one way to put the magnitude of the story playing out right now in the greatest human disaster on this planet. It's happening in East Africa , the Horn of Africa , where babies and children are starving in a wave of suffering now from Somalia to Kenya . And as we add to the size of our team of journalists there, NBC 's Kate Snow has made it now to Kenya . She's on the ground at a UN compound. And, Kate , good evening.

    KATE SNOW reporting: Good evening to you, Brian . We're about 60 miles from the Somalia border here. Think of Dadaab as an oasis. Somalis know if they can just get here, they can get food and water and potentially survive. But it is straining the system. As we flew in today, we could see just how fast this tent city is growing. For hundreds of miles, nothing but parched, bright orange earth. And then we see it, the world's largest refugee outpost. The white tents are the official housing, but look at the outer rings of makeshift shelters; signs of desperation. About 1200 people arrive here every single day, every one of them with an unreal story. Halima Carone Une left her deaf husband behind and walked here with five children in tow -- only four of them made it. Habibra Ibrahim arrived Friday night.

    Ms. HABIBRA IBRAHIM:

    SNOW: 'We were attacked along the way,' she says. 'All of our bags taken. We have nothing. We hope we'll get help here.' This afternoon, at the newest official camp opened last Monday, people were

    settling in: kids playing in the dirt, making water barrels into toys. UN agencies are building as fast as they can, but they just can't keep up with the influx.

    Mr. WILLIAM SPINDLER (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees): It's not just the numbers, but also the conditions in which they arrive. We have never seen so high levels of malnutrition among children arriving. People arrive tired after walking for three or four weeks in some cases.

    SNOW: Ade Sharif and her two little girls left their home in Mogadishu a year ago, fleeing the violence between a weak temporary government and an Islamic insurgent group. When the drought made life even worse, they headed here. It's not perfect, but at least her children are fed and safe.

    Ms. ADE SHARIF:

    SNOW: 'At the moment,' she says, 'we've found peace.' In the city she fled, Somali's capital Mogadishu , government troops have been fighting to open up aid routes. This weekend the president of the fledgling government made a show of thanking troops for gaining some ground; but even today, reports that a member of parliament was gunned down. Many of the most drought-stricken regions of Somalia are still under rebel control. The fear is the aid just isn't getting through, and the fear is by the UN that the famine in Somalia could grow, could spread to other areas. And, Brian , it is worth noting that 12 million people across four countries now have been severely affected by this massive drought. Brian :

    WILLIAMS: Kate , thank you. Kate Snow , again, who has just arrived. Her reporting will begin tomorrow morning on "Today," we'll have more of it tomorrow night on NBC NIGHTLY NEWS . And for those viewers wanting to help the situation, the people here in Africa , we have a growing list of relief organizations we're maintaining on our Web site , nightly.msnbc.com. When we

Photos: Famine strikes Eastern Africa

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  1. Families from southern Somalia wait for food rations at Maalin refugee camp at Hawlwadag district in Mogadishu on Sept.15. Somalia is the country worst affected by a severe drought in east Africa and the Horn that has left some 13 million people in danger of starvation. (Abdurashid Abikar / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Somali refugees stand amid graves in a makeshift graveyard at Ifo camp, one of three camps that make up the sprawling Dadaab refugee complex in Dadaab town, northeastern Kenya, on Sept. 5. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Somali refugee children sit in a circle with wooden boards inscribed with lines from the Quran, in the outskirts of Ifo camp, Dadaab refugee complex, northeastern Kenya, on Sept. 6. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Somalian women queue for food at the Gift Of The Givers makeshift feeding center on Sept. 10 in Mogadishu. Gift Of The Givers is a South African-based disaster relief organization that is providing medical assistance and food aid to the famine-stricken people of Somalia. (Gallo Images / Getty Images Contributor) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Tahliil Hussan holds an X-ray that shows the bullet still lodged in his abdomen at the Forlanini Hospital on Sept. 11 in Mogadishu, Somalia. A delegation from Gift Of The Givers Foundation is providing medical services to the famine-stricken in Somalia. (Gallo Images / Getty Images Contributor) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. A newly arrived Somali refugee boy tries to drink from a cup as he waits in line with his mother at a refugee reception center at Hagadera camp, one of three refugee camps that make up sprawling Dadaab refugee complex in Dadaab town, northeastern Kenya, on Sept. 5. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. A newly arrived Somali refugee woman sobs as she is confined inside a makeshift cell for not following the procedures at a refugee reception center at Hagadera camp, northeastern Kenya, on Sept. 5. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Somali refugees bury the body of 3-month-old Halima Hassan Yarow, who died from malnutrition, at Ifo camp, northeastern Kenya, on Sept. 5. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Refugees who have been living on the outskirts of the camps in Hagadera rush to load their belongings onto trucks as they choose to relocate to the newly-opened Kambioos settlement, at the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya on Aug. 29. The U.N. High Commission for Refugees regularly logs more than 1,000 new arrivals from Somalia each day as the region's famine crisis continues. (Jonathan Ernst / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Men make donations to help the people of Somalia in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Aug. 22. A famine has swept across the Horn of Africa, leaving at least 3.7 million Somalis at risk of starvation. (Fahad Shadeed / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Weak and malnourished, Hassan Ali Musa, 4, sits with his father Iisa Ali Musa at the Banadir hospital in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Aug. 20. The U.N. estimates that more than 100,000 Somalis have fled to Mogadishu from famine and drought in the countryside. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. People cheer as cooked food is brought out at a feeding center in Mogadishu on Aug. 18. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. A famine refugee plays with a soccer ball next to a camp for people displaced by drought and famine in Mogadishu on Aug. 18. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. A security guard beats a woman for trying to enter a feeding center at a camp for people displaced by drought and famine in Mogadishu on Aug. 18. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Somalis receive medical treatment at an outpatient hospital run by the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) in Mogadishu on Aug. 17. More than 10,000 people are treated monthly at AMISOM's three hospitals in Mogadishu. Ugandan doctors there say that increasingly many of the ailments, especially among children, are related to malnutrition. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. A security guard stands vigil outside a feeding center in Mogadishu on Aug. 16. The center, which serves cooked meals prepared using World Food Program aid, helps feed thousands of Somalis who have fled famine and drought in the countryside and have settled in makeshift camps throughout Mogadishu. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. An internally displaced Somali woman attends to her malnourished son at the Banadir hospital in Mogadishu on Aug. 16. Somalia called for the creation of a new force to protect food aid convoys and camps in the famine-hit country. (Ismail Taxta / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Relatives of Hassan Abdulkadir Adan, third from left (rear), help to lower the body of his 7-year-old son into a grave in a refugee camp in Mogadishu, on Aug. 16. (Farah Abdi Warsameh / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. A mother mourns the death of her son at the Banadir hospital on Aug. 16, in Mogadishu. The hospital has been overwhelmed by new patients, as sickness spreads through camps for people displaced by drought and famine. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. A Somali boy receives a ration of cornmeal in the courtyard of a Somali non-governmental organization in Mogadishu. (Roberto Schmidt / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Editor's note:
    This image contains graphic content that some viewers may find disturbing.

    Click to view the image, or use the buttons above to navigate away.

    Mulmillo closes the eyes of her two-year-old son Mahmud moments after he died from malnutrition and related complications at a local hospital in Mogadishu on Aug. 15. Mulmillo, her husband and three children fled their village in the Lower Shabelle region of southern Somalia and came to Mogadishu in search of a refuge from severe drought in the region. (Roberto Schmidt / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. Halima Hassan holds her severely malnourished son Abdulrahman Abshir, 7 months, at the Banadir hospital in Mogadishu on Aug. 14. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. A group of Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) gather inside a courtyard after being designated to receive food aid from a Kuwaiti based Islamic charity in Mogadishu on Aug. 14. (Roberto Schmidt / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. A Somali boy sings an Irish song to his classmates during class at the Illeys primary school in Dagahaley refugee camp, north of Dadaab, Eastern Kenya, on Aug. 11. (Jerome Delay / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. A Somali woman stands with several cans of water, ready to be transported by camel, in the town of Dhobley on Aug. 11. (Phil Moore / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. Ethnic Turkana children sing and dance at Kalokutanyang Mobile School as aid workers arrive to inspect them in Kalokutanyang, Turkana, northwestern Kenya, on Aug. 9. A local official says that relief food has not reached many parts of the Turkana region where more than half the population is dependent on it, resulting in increasing child malnutrition. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. A child stands in front of her home at a refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya, on Aug. 4. (Schalk van Zuydam / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. A Somali father with his daughter sits at the head of a line with other refugees at a registration center on Aug. 2, at Dagahaley refugee site, after being displaced from their home in southern Somalia by famine. (Tony Karumba / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. Residents of Mwingi District fetch water from a muddy puddle, one of the only sources of clean water in Kenya on Aug. 2. (Ken Oloo/ / Red Cross and Red Crescent via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. A woman from southern Somalia holds her malnourished children at Banadir hospital in Mogadishu, Somalia, Tuesday, Aug. 2. (Farah Abdi Warsameh / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  31. Somali refugees sit around a makeshift grave for fellow refugee Husein Mahalin, who died at the age of 20, due to illness outside the Ifo camp, one of three that make up the sprawling refugee camp in Dadaab, northeastern Kenya, on Aug. 1. (Dai Kurokawa / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  32. A young Somali refugee gets vaccinated at a paediatric vaccination center at Hagadere refugee site within the Dadaab refugee complex in Kenya's northeast province on Aug. 1. (Tony Karumba / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  33. A young boy from southern Somalia takes cover under a plastic sheet in a refugee camp in Mogadishu, Somalia, Sunday, July 31. Tens of thousands of famine-stricken Somali refugees were cold and drenched after torrential rains overnight pounded their makeshift structures in the capital, Mogadishu. Rains are needed to plant crops and alleviate the drought that is causing famine in Somalia but on Saturday night the rains added to the misery of refugees who live in structures made of sticks and pieces of cloth. (Farah Abdi Warsameh / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  34. Warehouse attendants carry bags of goods donated during a drive by the Somali community living in Kenya's capital, to aid Somali refugees in Kenya's northeast province at the Dadaab refugee complex, on July 29. (Tony Karumba / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  35. A newly arrived Somali refugee is forced out of the queue outside a reception centre in the Ifo 2 refugee camp in Dadaab, near the Kenya-Somalia border, on July 28. (Thomas Mukoya / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  36. A severely malnourished Somali child receives Oral Rehydration Salts [O.R.S.] at Mogadishu's Banadir hospital, on July 28. (Mustafa Abdi / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  37. Men unload the first airlifted humanitarian food aid at the Aden Abdulle Osman International Airport in Mogadishu, Somalia, on July 27. The World Food Program airlifted 10 tons of emergency supplies to Mogadishu to feed thousands of malnourished children in drought-hit Somalia. Somalia is the country worst affected by a prolonged drought in Eastern Africa -- the region's worst in 60 years -- that has put some 12 million people in danger of starvation and spurred a global fund-raising campaign. (Feisal Omar / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  38. Children drink water from the same place as cattle at Liboi, Kenya, on July 27. UNICEF says it is trying to vaccinate more than 300,000 children in Kenya in an emergency program designed to prevent an outbreak of disease as refugees stream into northern Kenya from famine-hit Somalia. (Schalk van Zuydam / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  39. A doctor examines Mihag Gedi Farah, a seven-month-old child with a weight of 7.5lbs (3.4kg), in a field hospital of the International Rescue Committee, IRC, in the town of Dadaab, Kenya, July 26. The U.N. will airlift emergency rations this week to parts of drought-ravaged Somalia to keep hungry refugees from dying along what an official calls the "roads of death." Tens of thousands already have trekked to neighboring Kenya and Ethiopia, hoping to get aid in refugee camps. (Schalk Van Zuydam / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  40. Used food tins are stacked at a field hospital of the International Rescue Committee, IRC, in Dadaab, July 26. (Schalk Van Zuydam / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  41. A malnourished child from southern Somalia is weighed in Banadir hospital in Mogadishu, July 24. The World Food Program can't reach 2.2 million Somalis in desperate need of aid in militant-controlled areas of Somalia, meaning refugee camps in nearby Kenya and Ethiopia are likely to continue seeing thousands of new refugees each week. (Farah Abdi Warsameh / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  42. A general view of the Dadaab Refugee camp in eastern Kenya on July 23, where the influx of Somali's displaced by a ravaging famine remains high. 12 million people are struggling from the worst regional drought in decades, affecting parts of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Djibouti and Uganda. (Tony Karumba / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  43. Somalian refugees disembark a bus in the registration area of the IFO refugee camp which makes up part of the giant Dadaab refugee settlement, July 23. The refugee camp at Dadaab, located close to the Kenyan border with Somalia, was originally designed in the early 1990s to accommodate 90,000 people but the UN estimates over 4 times as many reside there. (Oli Scarff / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  44. An aid worker using an iPad films the rotting carcass of a cow in Wajir near the Kenya-Somalia border, July 23. Since drought gripped the Horn of Africa, and especially since famine was declared in parts of Somalia, the international aid industry has swept in and out of refugee camps and remote hamlets in branded planes and snaking lines of white 4x4s. This humanitarian, diplomatic and media circus is necessary every time people go hungry in Africa, analysts say, because governments - both African and foreign - rarely respond early enough to looming catastrophes. (Barry Malone / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  45. A dust storm blows as newly arrived Somalian refugees settle on the edge of the Dagahaley refugee camp, which makes up part of the giant Dadaab refugee settlement, July 23. (Oli Scarff / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  46. A Somalian refugee helps to dig a latrine on the outskirts of the IFO refugee camp which makes up part of the giant Dadaab refugee settlement on July 23. (Oli Scarff / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  47. Somalian refugees wait in the registration area of the Dagahaley refugee camp, part of the Dadaab refugee settlement on July 23. (Oli Scarff / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  48. Somalian refugees' documents are checked at the entrance to the registration area of the IFO refugee camp, on July 23, in Dadaab, Kenya. (Oli Scarff / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  49. A mother washes her malnourished child in the Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Boders) hospital on July 22, in the Dagahaley refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya. (Oli Scarff / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  50. Drought-stricken camels drink water from a tank near Harfo, northwest of Somalia's capital Mogadishu, July 20. The United Nations declared famine in two regions of southern Somalia, and warned that this could spread further within two months in the war-ravaged Horn of Africa country unless donors step in. (Thomas Mukoya / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  51. Farhiya (centre) holds her 7-year-old sister Suladan by the hand as they follow their mother and brothers at the reception center of the Dolo Ado refugee camp near the Ethiopia-Somalia border on July 19. Refugees are being housed at the transit center while a new camp is being set up by the Ethiopian goverment and international aid organizations. Thousands of Somalis have fled in recent months to neighbouring Ethiopia and Kenya in search of food and water, with many dying along the way. (Roberto Schmidt / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  52. Somalis fleeing hunger in their drought-stricken nation walk along the main road leading from the Somalian border to the refugee camps around Dadaab, Kenya, on Wednesday, July 13. More than 11 million people in the Horn of Africa are confronting the worst drought in decades and need urgent assistance to stay alive, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said. (Rebecca Blackwell / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  53. A woman from southern Somalia struggles to build a makeshift shelter from tree branches at a new camp in Mogadishu, Somalia, on July 13. (Mohamed Sheikh Nor / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  54. Osman Ali Aliyow Mursal digs a burial plot among other graves for his four-year-old son, Aden Ibrahim, as men prepare to pray over the boy's body, wrapped in a plastic mat, on the outskirts of Ifo II Camp, outside Dadaab, Kenya, on Tuesday, July 12. Doctors were unable to save Aden, who died of diarrhea-related dehydration after four days of inpatient care. U.N. Refugee Chief Antonio Guterres said Sunday that drought-ridden Somalia is the "worst humanitarian disaster" in the world, after meeting with refugees who endured unspeakable hardship to reach the world's largest refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya. (Rebecca Blackwell / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  55. Aden Salaad, 2, looks up at his mother as she bathes him in a tub at a Doctors Without Borders hospital, where Aden is receiving treatment for malnutrition, in Dagahaley Camp, outside Dadaab, Kenya, on Monday, July 11. (Rebecca Blackwell / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  56. Somali refugees line up for food rations at a receiving center in Dagahaley Camp, outside Dadaab, Kenya, on Saturday, July 9. (Rebecca Blackwell / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  57. A Somali child from southern Somalia holds his brother as they wait outside a ruined building before making their way to the internally displaced persons camps in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Friday, July 8. (Farah Abdi Warsameh / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  58. A malnourished child is held by her grandmother at Wajir District hospital, Wajir town, Kenya, on July 6. (Sayyid Azim / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  59. A refugee from Southern Somalia carries her baby and her belongings, as she makes her way to a camp in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Monday, July 5. (Farah Abdi Warsameh / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
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