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Watch: The self-diagnosed sociopath

Do you have a sociopath in your life? Full story

How Spiderweb's Shocking Charge Captures Prey

Spiders may trap unsuspecting prey by sucking them in using electrostatic attraction, new research suggests. Full story

Meteorologist bug-eyed over on-screen spider

  Kristi Gordon, a meteorologist for Global BC in Canada, was surprised by a spider on the weather camera as she did her noon news forecast, and her reaction is going viral.

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Articles

Tough Love: Male Spiders Die for Sex

Smart Spiders Learn Best Way to Snag Prey


Male Black Widows Flip Sexual Cannibalism

Meet the Tarantula as Big as Your Face

5 Strange Sightings in the Peruvian Amazon

Bat-Eating Spiders Are Everywhere, Study Finds

Spider-Man's Silk Really Could Stop a Train

Parasitic wasps ambush ant-eating spiders

Space-flown spider dies in Smithsonian

Spider silk may act as pest repellant

Video

  Extreme animals: Fennec fox, spider monkey

Animal expert Jeff Musial shows off five animals that each have a unique, extreme feature, including fennec foxes with extremely large ears, spider monkeys with very long arms and legs, and a skink that looks like it has two heads.

  Rare spider creates web of controversy

A major construction project has come to a sudden halt due to the discovery of a rare spider that hasn’t been seen for 30 years. The discovery is pitting conservation efforts up against frustrated and traffic-delayed drivers. NBC's Janet Shamlian reports.

  Ashanti: I want to make reading fun for kids

Singer and actress Ashanti is helping encourage kids to read as an ambassador of the “Read For The Record” campaign. She tells TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie that her past experience working in a daycare center gave her the opportunity to see how reading can help shape children’s lives.

  Rare spider halts $15 million road project

The discovery of an extremely rare spider that was last seen in 1980 halts a $15-million dollar highway construction project in Texas. WOAI’s Darlene Dorsey reports.

  Drought triggers poisonous spider invasion

A mild winter and a long drought is causing a dangerous spike in spider infestations in parts of Oklahoma as brown recluse spiders invade homes in search of water. NBC’s Casey Roebuck reports.

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Related Photos

A spider wraps a locust caught in the web in the Sharr mountains southwest of the Kosovo capital Pristina
A spider wraps a locust caught in the web in the Sharr mountains southwest of the Kosovo capital Pristina

A spider wraps a locust caught in the web in the Sharr mountains southwest of the Kosovo capital Pristina, July 9, 2013. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Hazir Reka (KOSOVO - Tags: ANIMALS)

A spider wraps a caught locust in the Sharr mountains southwest of the Kosovo capital Pristina
A spider wraps a caught locust in the Sharr mountains southwest of the Kosovo capital Pristina

A spider wraps a caught locust in the Sharr mountains southwest of the Kosovo capital Pristina, July 9, 2013. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Hazir Reka (KOSOVO - Tags: ANIMALS)

Workers move the body of a model of a giant Tarantula spider as it arrives at Chester Zoo in northern England
Workers move the body of a model of a giant Tarantula spider as it arrives at Chester Zoo in northern England

Workers move the body of a model of a giant Tarantula spider as it arrives at Chester Zoo in northern England July 1, 2013. The spider will form part of an exhibition featuring 13 giant robotic replicas including scorpions and ladybirds. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

Workers move the body from a model of a giant Tarantula spider as it arrives at Chester Zoo in northern England
Workers move the body from a model of a giant Tarantula spider as it arrives at Chester Zoo in northern England

Workers move the body from a model of a giant Tarantula spider as it arrives at Chester Zoo in northern England July 1, 2013. The spider will form part of an exhibition featuring 13 giant robotic replicas including scorpions and ladybirds. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)