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  Assisted living in America – is the elderly at risk?

Scientists warn of overwhelming costs of mental illness

LONDON (Reuters) - Health systems could be "overwhelmed" by the costs of coping with mental illnesses such as dementia, depression and addiction if nothing is done now to boost investment in research, leading neuroscientists said on Thursday. Full story

Memory decline may be earliest sign of dementia

Memory problems that are often dismissed as a normal part of aging may not be so harmless after all. Full story

Working later into life may help prevent dementia, study shows

  Is this another reason to delay retirement? Workers who put off retiring have less risk in developing Alzheimer's or dementia, a new study from France shows. NBC News' Dr. Nancy Snyderman joins Morning Joe to discuss. Dr. Snyderman also discusses a new study on aspirin and colon cancer and a link be

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Later retirement linked to lower risk of Alzheimer's, study shows

Unsteady Heartbeat Could Spell Early Dementia

Could family longevity protect against dementia?

Antioxidants may not ward off strokes, dementia

NYT: When illness makes a spouse a stranger

Dementia cases worldwide to triple by 2050

NYT: Killers care for inmates with dementia

Think you're in bad health? Your dementia risk is higher

Dementia patients suffer dubious hospitalizations

Sleep apnea linked to dementia risk

Video

  New studies on reducing risk of colon cancer, dementia

A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found women who take low-dose aspirin every other day may reduce the risk of colon cancer among women; a different study examining the self-employed found those who worked longer before retiring had a lower risk of dementia. NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman report

  Delaying retirement and dementia?

A French government research agency shows delaying retirement can delay dementia. Dr. Nancy Snyderman, NBC's chief medical editor, explains the "use it or lose it" strategy. "Now we know these artificial deadlines for retirement are rather bogus," she ...

  What dementia is projected to cost us

New research released from the RAND Corporation shows the costs and the number of people with dementia in the U.S. is expected to double by 2040. The Melissa Harris-Perry panel discusses whether the county is unprepared to care for this population.

  First-hand account of living with Alzheimer's

Challenges facing caregivers and those living with dementia. NBC News' Erika Edwards reports.

  86-year-old with dementia charged with voter fraud

An 86-year-old Minnesota woman says her dementia caused her to vote twice in the 2012 primary election, but prosecutors say they have no discretion in cases of alleged voter fraud. KARE’s Allen Constantini reports.

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Related Photos

In this Sept. 20, 2012 photo, staffer Victor Rivera dances with a dementia patient at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale in the Bronx borough of New York. The Hebrew Home has a program that provides care and activity overnight for dementia victims with sleep problems.

A holocaust survivor plays ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia in Los Angeles
A holocaust survivor plays ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia in Los Angeles

Holocaust survivor Betty Stein, 92, plays ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia at the Arthur Gilbert table tennis center in Los Angeles, California June 15, 2011. Founder Mikhail Zaretsksky says the sport does not cure, or even slow down the disease, but helps the 100 part

A holocaust survivor is helped by her coach as she plays ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia in Los Angeles
A holocaust survivor is helped by her coach as she plays ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia in Los Angeles

Holocaust survivor Betty Stein, 92, is helped by coach Irina Jestkova as she plays ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia at the Arthur Gilbert table tennis center in Los Angeles, California June 15, 2011. Founder Mikhail Zaretsksky says the sport does not cure, or even slo

A woman takes a break while playing ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia in Los Angeles
A woman takes a break while playing ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia in Los Angeles

Freyda Dvorak, 87, takes a break while playing ping pong at a program for people with Alzheimer's and dementia at the Arthur Gilbert table tennis center in Los Angeles, California June 15, 2011. Founder Mikhail Zaretsksky says the sport does not cure, or even slow down the disease, but helps the 100