updated 9/20/2011 10:26:55 AM ET 2011-09-20T14:26:55

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum will celebrate the opening of its new visitor center by hosting a naturalization ceremony for 18 New York City residents as they become U.S. citizens.

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Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer is among the scheduled speakers at Tuesday's ceremony.

The museum's new visitor and education center will include classrooms, a screening room and a demonstration kitchen for culinary programs.

The museum was founded in 1988 in a landmarked tenement building. It was home to more than 7,000 immigrants between 1863 and 1935.

It's dedicated to using the history of its site as a tool for addressing issues that are still relevant today, including immigration.

The 18 New York City residents being naturalized come from 17 nations.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Video: New York city guide

Photos: High Line expansion

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  1. Popular park expands

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg is flanked by members of the step team Organized C.H.A.O.S. at the start of a news conference in New York on June 7, 2011, to announce the opening of the second section of the High Line, an elevated park in Manhattan. (Seth Wenig / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Mile-long park

    The new section of High Line ends at 30th Street and will add 10 blocks, doubling the length of the High Line to one mile. The original section opened in June 2009. The High Line was formerly an elevated railway 30 feet above the city's West Side. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Green space

    Rob Newgarden waters plants on the second section of the High Line before it opened to the public. The park, which is free, opens at 7 a.m. year-round. (Seth Wenig / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. City views

    People can take in the view through an outdoor ad frame while sitting on a bench in the new section of the High Line. The long-awaited addition to the park provides prime lounging spots. (Mary Altaffer / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Park doubles in size

    A segment of the newly opened second section of the High Line park. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. A traffic-free stroll

    A path running through the second section of the High Line provides a traffic-free stroll. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. High Line's history

    This 1953 photo made by James Shaughnessy (courtesy of Friends of the High Line) shows the Empire State Building from the High Line. Freight traffic in the area began on street level in 1847, delivering dairy, meat and produce to factories and packing plants on the West Side near the Hudson River. (James Shaughnessy / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Space for lounging

    The lush lawn provides comfortable seating along the second section of the High Line. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. More coming?

    The undeveloped third section of the High Line in New York lies beyond a fence from the second section. (Mary Altaffer / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
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