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updated 2/3/2012 5:21:47 PM ET 2012-02-03T22:21:47

UPDATE: This story has been updated with Anonymous' attack on the Department of Homeland Security's website.

A sensitive conference call between the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Scotland Yard, in which several members of both agencies discussed plans to track down and prosecute members of Anonymous and its offshoot hacking networks, was intercepted and leaked by — who else? — Anonymous.

The nearly 17-minute phone call  from Jan. 17, showed up on YouTube today (Feb. 3). The call covers dates of planned arrests, names of suspects and details of evidence in police possession.

Included with the video was a link to a Pastebin  post showing an email purportedly sent by an FBI agent, in which he gives details and a password for officials in the U.K., Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden and France to access the call. The email says the purpose of the call is to "discuss the ongoing investigations related to Anonymous, Lulzsec, Antisec, and other associated splinter groups."

An FBI spokesperson told SecurityNewsDaily, "The information was intended for law enforcement officers only and was illegally obtained. A criminal investigation is under way to identify and hold accountable those responsible."

At one point in the call, a British participant outlines the planned arrest in eight weeks of "Kayla" and "Tflow" known members of Anonymous who in the past have been part of high-profile hacks under the LulzSec banner. In an international dragnet  last July, London's Metropolitan Police e-Crime Unit arrested a 16-year-old thought at the time to be Tflow.

The agents also discuss Ryan Cleary, a British teen arrested last June in London for carrying out denial-of-service attacks intelligence agencies. The agent says his colleagues are currently going through the "indecent images" found on Cleary's hard drive. And they discuss the impending arrest of another LulzSec-related hacker who may be responsible for the hack into the Steam gaming network in November.

Anonymous intercepted and leaked the phone call as part of its ongoing "F*** FBI Friday," campaign. Announced with the Twitter hashtag #FFF, the hackers have in the past carried out similar attacks and pranks on law-enforcement websites, as well as releases of private personal information about police officers and  sheriffs' deputies.

UPDATE: At approximately 4:00 (EST), Anonymous struck again, launching a denial-of-service attack that took the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's website, www.dhs.gov, offline. The DHS site currently contains an error message.

© 2012 SecurityNewsDaily. All rights reserved

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