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Video: Disaster on the sea and ‘Inside Concordia’

  1. Closed captioning of: Disaster on the sea and ‘Inside Concordia’

    >>> nice to be seeing you. i'm dylan ratigan . another wild week coming to a conclusion. we start today with a different approach. we have the privilege and really the opportunity to explore some of this with you. we couldn't help. exclusive footage from inside the most horrifying commercial sea disaster since the titanic. referring to the concordia disaster. 17 people lost their lives. we understand that this departure from where we'd dipically start the show, but with the video and story so compelling, we did want to get this out into the conversation this afternoon. all of it is featured in the discovery channel special that will air this weekend. one clip despite the captain's orders for passengers to remain calm and stay on the boat, understandably, in the face of those orders in a boat that was sink bing, they did not listen to the captain.

    >> i think he's in denial. i think he's hoping against hope he can keep his ship afloat. he does not take that important step of ordering everyone to lifeboat stations early enough for them to avoid the panic that comes with the call " abandon ship ."

    >> that most significant leadership trait, the humility to actually acknowledge what's happening and adjust, lacking. the captain, by the time he called abandon ship , the ship was already tipping over. thousands of passengers still on board the boat at the time not nearly enough lifeboats at that time to take them off the boat. incredibly, the captain's actions and judgment are believed to have cost lives, the discovery channel experts believe a change in the wind direction at the moment of the disaster actually saved many lives. it it airs this sunday night at 10:00 p.m . captain michael burns of the maritime academy helped analyze the disaster for the folks at the discovery channel . let's start with how the wind could have saved all those people. walk us through your logic on that.

    >> well, what happened with our investigation, we had access to position data that showed the moment that the ship did strike the rocks. and then begin to slowly lose speed and come to rest dead in the water . . the wind direction at the time was coming from the northeast. it helped to set the ship down on to the shore where it finally came to rest on the ocean floor . had had that wind direction been slightly different, it's possible the ship could have been lost all together.

    >> this story were it not so real and were the consequences not so permanent and disastrous is almost like a mythological tale of bad leadership. of the inability to recognize and have the humility to pivot, if you will, or to change inside of your course of actions and command because of either your own denial or own ego or whatever it might be is the observation from a casual viewer of myself like this, does that correlate with the way you conducted your analysis?

    >> certainly, to put one's ego aside and realize that there are lives you're responsible for is something that that captain has to take into account. and giving the order to abandon ship is one of the most gut-wrenching decisions he could ever have to make.

    >> and your view based on the analysis that you have conducted as to -- actually, forget your the protocol? is there a protocol at which that individual must order abandon ship regardless of how it might reflect on how they have been driving the ship or any variable that may ultimately fall to their responsibility that occurred prior?

    >> well, the decision to abandon ship ultimately rests with the master. in his mind, if conditions on the ship are such that he doesn't think that people can survive on board, then he's obliged to give the order to abandon ship . and that order needs to be given in enough time for everybody to be accounted for and to board the lifeboats and abandon the ship with everybody safely escaping.

    >> so the threshold for the decision, as soon as it appears that the risk of loss of life off the boat is lower than it is on the boat, that's the sort of judgment around which any ship captain is deciding. is that correct?

    >> that's ultimately the decision he would have to make. are my chances of survival better in the lifeboats than they are on board the ship?

    >> and how much of that process is revealed in this piece that you led for discovery ?

    >> well, it seems that the order to abandon ship may have been delayed. the ship was taking on water and beginning to list to the star board side of the ship. and that caused some of the lifeboats to have some difficulty in launching because of the severe angle that she was listing.

    >> when you look at what is possible in the modern day , which is really the only reason we're able to have this conversation, where you have camera footage inside of a large commercial cruise liner , a very familiar experience to a lot of people around the world, you think about sort of the nightmares that people conjure around the titanic and all of this. what do you believe we will learn by experiencing what is presented in this video and really learn about the core characteristics of leadership in making difficult decisions, whatever the decisions were on this particular ship?

    >> one of the things i think we'll take away in terms of leadership is that the captain really needs to, um, put his ego aside in evaluating the situation that's going on there and realize that the lives of thousands of people are in his hands. and he needs to make decisions that are in their best interests and not necessarily his.

    >> and is there any parallel to the research around the "titanic"? it had a tremendous amount of ego. the certainty of its grandeur amplifies the irony of the tragedy. and we see a lot of leadership, and i don't mean to take you to a place that's less comfortable, so you have no obligation to do this. you look broadly at corporate leadership, all the leadership in this country and really in the world, it seems like there's a tendency in a lot of leaders to skew towards self-preservation or their sense of self-preservation at the expense for whom they have assumed responsibility. and i'm interested in whether you feel that i'm going too far in sort of offering that as a journalist as an observation?

    >> i would say that as a practicing mariner, as someone who has been captain of his own ship and i'm sure many of my fellow mariners would agree with me, the safety of the ship and of the crew is of utmost importance to you. you will do anything in your power to keep them safe. you just have to be in that position and be prepared to deal with the consequences.

    >> what would you say of other leaderships of this country, outside of discipline and danger that you're forced to work in, obviously, with a large set of risks and very fatal consequences, at a lower threshold, what would you say is something we could all learn about leadership that is so essential to your function and all our maritime captain's function on the water around the world?

    >> to lead by example is something. certainly that we teach our cadets at the academy. to take care of your people. and they will take care of you.

    >> thank you, captain michael burns out of the massachusetts maritime academy . there's the piece. " cruise ship disaster inside the concordia." all sorts of footage included in that on sunday at 10:00 p.m . thank you for indulging my questions. coming up,

Photos: Luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia runs aground

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  1. A diver participates in a search operation Sept. 24, 2013, for two missing bodies onboard the Costa Concordia. Divers on Sept. 26 found what they believe to be the last two missing bodies from the sea where the Costa Concordia cruise liner sank last year off the Italian island of Giglio. The huge ship was carrying more than 4,000 holidaymakers and crew when it capsized after striking rocks on January 13, 2012, killing 32 people, including two whose bodies were not recovered. (Laura Lezza / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Two images taken by the Astrium satellite of the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship in the harbor of Isola de Giglio, on Sept. 12 (left) and after it was turned upright on Sept. 17 (right). (EADS via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. A damaged section of the stricken Costa Concordia is visible after a parbuckling operation successfully uprighted the ship in the early hours of Sept. 17. Work began the previous day to right the stricken vessel, which capsized on Jan. 12, 2012. (Marco Secchi / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. The Costa Concordia is seen at the end of the parbuckling operation outside Giglio harbor on Sept. 17. Salvage crews raised the cruise liner in one of the most difficult and expensive wreck recovery projects ever performed. In a 19-hour operation, the massive ship was pulled upright by a series of huge jacks and cables and left resting in 30 meters of water on underwater platforms drilled into the rocky sea bed. (Tony Gentile / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. This combination shows four photos of the Costa Concordia, after it ran aground on Jan. 14, 2012 (top left), beginning to emerge during the salvage operation on Sept. 16 (top right and bottom left) and after it was turned upright on Sept. 17 (bottom right). (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. The Costa Concordia is seen after it was lifted upright, on the Tuscan Island of Giglio, Italy, early on Sept. 17. The crippled cruise ship was pulled completely upright early Tuesday after a complicated, 19-hour operation to wrench it from its side where it capsized last year off Tuscany, with officials declaring it a "perfect" end to a daring and unprecedented engineering feat. (Andrew Medichini / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. The wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship begins to emerge from water on Sept. 16. Thirty-two people died when the ship, with 4,200 passengers onboard, hit rocks and ran aground off the island of Giglio. (Vincenzo Pinto / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. People watch as the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship begins to emerge from water on Sept. 16. Thirty-two people died when the ship, with 4,200 passengers onboard, hit rocks and ran aground off the island of Giglio. (Vincenzo Pinto / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Salvage workers work on the capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship on Sept. 16. (Tony Gentile / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. A lightning storm is pictured over the sea near the capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia on Sept. 15. The luxury cruise ship capsized and sank on Jan. 13, 2012, after approaching the Tuscan island to perform a manuever close to the shore known as a "salute." It struck a rock which tore a gash in its hull and capsized soon afterwards. 32 people lost their lives during a chaotic nighttime evacuation of 4,200 passengers and crew. Two bodies have still not been recovered. (Tony Gentile / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. An aerial view, taken from an Italian navy helicopter, shows the Costa Concordia surrounded by other vessels on Aug. 26. (Alessandro Bianchi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. People sunbathe in front of the capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia lying surrounded by cranes outside Giglio harbor on July 17. (Giampiero Sposito / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Workers stand on the Costa Concordia cruise ship near the port on Jan. 8, 2013 on the Italian island of Giglio. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. The Costa Concordia cruise ship lays near the harbor of Giglio Porto on Oct. 14, 2012. The luxury cruise ship capsized and sank on Jan. 13, 2012, after approaching the Tuscan island of Giglio to perform a manuever close to the shore known as a "salute." It struck a rock which tore a gash in its hull and capsized soon afterwards. 32 people lost their lives during a chaotic nighttime evacuation of 4,200 passengers and crew. Two bodies have still not been recovered. (Filippo Monteforte / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Francesco Schettino, the former captain of the Costa Concordia luxury cruise ship, arrives at the Teatro Moderno theater for a pre-trial hearing in Grosseto, Italy, on Oct. 16, 2012. The case of Schettino, 51, is of such interest that a theater had to be turned into a courtroom to accommodate those who had a legitimate claim to be at the closed-door hearing. The court will decide if Schettino should face a full trial, which could take place next year. (Gregorio Borgia / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. A boy prepares to snorkel in front of the wreckage of the capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia, near the harbour of Giglio Porto, on Aug. 28, 2012. Tourists on the Tuscan coast were taking part in a rather macabre form of sightseeing -- taking boat trips to view the wreckage of shipwrecked cruise liner Costa Concordia, where 32 people lost their lives after it hit rocks on January 13. (Alessandro Bianchi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. Workers prepare to remove a giant rock embedded in the hull of the capsized Costa Concordia on July 12. (Remo Casilli / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. A couple sunbathe in front of the wreckage of the Costa Concordia on June 20. (Max Rossi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. The body of a victim, retrieved from the Costa Concordia cruise ship which ran aground off the west coast of Italy, is lifted to a helicopter during operations to bring up four bodies from the wreck at Giglio island on Feb. 23. Divers found a total of eight bodies on the wreck on Feb. 22. (Giampiero Sposito / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. The capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship is seen off the west coast of Italy at the snow-covered Giglio island on Feb. 11. Salvage and rescue operations on the capsized ship faced a new obstacle on Friday as rare snowfall hit Giglio, stopping ferry services out of Porto Santo Stefano to the island. (Giampiero Sposito / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Hungarians carry the coffin of Sandor Feher, a violinist who died during the accident after he had rescued children and other passengers on the Costa Concordia. The funeral ceremony was held in Budapest on Feb. 1, in the KIspest cemetery. (Ferenc Isza / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. Technicians of SMIT, the Dutch extraction company, work in the port of Giglio on Jan. 28. Rough seas forced a delay in the planned start of the operation to remove a half-million gallons of fuel from the grounded Costa Concordia. (Pier Paolo Cito / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. Seagulls fly in front of the grounded cruise ship on Jan. 30. Residents of Giglio are growing increasingly worried about threats to the environment and the future of the Italian island as the recovery operation is forecast to take up to a year. (Pier Paolo Cito / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. A firefighter is lowered from a helicopter above the Costa Concordia in an undated photo made available on Jan. 23. (Vigili del Fuoco via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. Two Italian navy scuba divers inspect inside the Costa Concordia as it lies on its side, half-submerged and threatening to slide into deeper waters, in this photo released on Jan. 23. (Marina Militare via Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. A firefighter climbs on the bridge of the Costa Concordia on Jan. 22. A week after the 114,500-ton ship ran aground and capsized off the Tuscan coast, hopes of finding anyone alive have all but disappeared. (Paul Hanna / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. Family members of missing victims throw flowers into the water near the wrecked Costa Concordia cruise ship, on Jan. 21. (Giampiero Sposito / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. Carabinieri police divers passing by the bell of the stricken Costa Concordia luxury liner during their underwater search on Jan. 19. Rescuers were forced to suspend operations after the ship moved again on Friday, firefighters' spokeman Luca Cari said. (Carabinieri via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. Relatives and friends of victims of the stricken cruise ship are escorted by police to a local church on the island of Giglio on Jan. 19. (Massimo Percossi / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. Scuba divers of the Gruppo Carabinieri Subaquei diving under the wreck of the Costa Concordia on Jan. 19. (Carabinieri via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  31. Search and rescue teams continue the search for survivors on the Costa Concordia on Jan. 19. (Tullio M. Puglia / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  32. The Costa Serena, background, passes its wrecked sister ship, the Costa Concordia, on Jan. 18. International cruise goers put on a brave face as Costa's first Mediterranean tour since last week's tragedy set sail out of the same port as the doomed luxury liner. (Vincenzo Pinto / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  33. Angel Paredes, right, a Peruvian crew member who survived the Costa Concordia cruise ship disaster, is welcomed by relatives at Lima's airport on Jan. 18. (Mariana Bazo / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  34. Police divers surface in the water Jan. 18 close to the wrecked Costa Concordia. (Massimo Percossi / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  35. A bench from the stricken ship lies on nearby rocks on Jan. 18. (Massimo Percossi / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  36. A satellite image shows the wreck of the Costa Concordia off the island of Giglio on Jan. 17. (DigitalGlobe) Back to slideshow navigation
  37. The heavily listing Costa Concordia, as seen the night of Jan. 16 from the harbor on Giglio island. (Andreas Solaro / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  38. A woman looks at the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise liner on Jan. 16. The owner of the luxury liner said its captain had made "errors of judgment" as the search continued for the missing. (Gregorio Borgia / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  39. A woman is hugged by a relative upon her arrival early Jan. 16 on the French Indian Ocean island of La Reunion with 30 other passengers who survived the Costa Concordia accident. (Richard Bouhet / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  40. Rescue workers climb aboard the Costa Concordia on Jan. 16. (Max Rossi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  41. Costa Concordia passenger Lauren Moore, right, of Bowling Green, Ky., is greeted upon her return from Italy by her father, Ronnie Moore, second right; mother, Sarah Moore; and sister, Leslie Moore, left, on Jan 15 at the Louisville International Airport. (Alex Slitz / Daily News via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  42. Firefighters on a dinghy look at a rock emerging from the side of the Costa Concordia on Jan. 15. (Andrea Sinibaldi / Lapresse via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  43. Costa Concordia cruise liner captain Francesco Schettino, right, is escorted by police on Jan. 14 in Grosseto. Schettino was arrested on charges of manslaughter, causing a shipwreck and abandoning ship, police said. (Stringer/italy / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  44. The Costa Concordia cruise ship that ran aground is seen Jan. 14 off the coast of Giglio. At least 11 people were killed, and rescuers were searching for other victims after the Italian cruise ship carrying more than 4,000 people ran aground. (Italian Guardia di Finanza / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  45. Passengers arrive at Porto Santo Stefano on Jan. 14 after the Costa Concordia ran aground. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  46. Italian coast guard personnel recover the "black box" of the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia to establish the precise sequence of events behind the disaster, which occurred in calm seas and clear weather. (Gregorio Borgia / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  47. Rescue workers help a woman Jan. 14 upon her arrival at Porto Santo Stefano in Italy. Helicopters and nearby boats assisted in the rescue efforts. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  48. Members of the emergency services take an injured passenger from the Costa Concordia to a waiting ambulance Jan. 14 on the island of Giglio. (Enzo Russo / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  49. Passengers and crew members wearing life jackets prepare to evacuate the Costa Concordia on Jan. 13 after the ship ran aground. (Sky Italia via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  50. The Costa Concordia lays on its starboard side after it ran aground on Jan. 13, forcing some 4,200 people aboard to evacuate aboard lifeboats to the nearby Isola del Giglio. (Giuseppe Modesti / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
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