Photos: Hosni Mubarak

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  1. Hosni Mubarak is seen as a young Royal Egyptian Air Force Lieutenant in a photo taken in the early 1950s. He rose through the Egyptian Air Forces ranks, eventually becoming Commander of the Air Force and Egyptian Deputy Minister of Defense in 1972, and was appointed vice president by President Anwar Sadat in 1975. After Sadat’s assassination in October 1981, Mubarak became the fourth president of Egypt and held that position for 29 years until he was deposed in a popular uprising in 2011. His final denouement came when he was sentenced to life in prison on June 2, 2012 for complicity in the killings of protesters during Egypt’s 2011 uprising. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. French prime minister Jacques Chirac, right, speaks to Egyptian Vice-President Mohammed Hosni Mubarak during a lunch on June 7, 1975 as they attend the air and space show at Le Bourget. President Sadat appointed Mubarak to vice-president where he made many trips abroad to meet with foreign leaders. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Egyptian Vice-President Mohammed Hosni Mubarak meets Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, right, in November 1976, during an official visit in Bagdad. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Vice President Mubarak is seen with President Anwar Sadat, right, at a Cairo military parade on October 6, 1981, moments before Sadat was assassinated. During the attack by Islamist militants, Mubarak was lucky to escape. He subsequently survived six assassination attempts on his own life. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Egyptian soldiers fire on Egyptian President Anwar Al-Sadat while reviewing a military parade in honor of the October 1973 War, on October 6, 1981 in Cairo. The assassination was attributed to the Muslim Brotherhood extremist group. (Makaram Gad Alkareem / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Mubarak is sworn in as Egypt's fourth president following Sadat's death on October 14, 1981, as ally Sudanese President Janfar Numeiry, left, listens at the Egyptian Parliament. He was re-elected five times after taking office. Blaming the violent circumstances in which he came to power, during the 29 years of Mubarak’s presidency the country was kept under a “state of emergency” law which allowed the state to arrest its citizens and imprison them for any length of time without trial. The state of emergency outlawed any non-governmental political activity and resulted in tens of thousands of political prisoners. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Mubarak and his wife Suzanne at the airport in Tokyo during an official visit to Japan on April 5, 1983. Mubarak married the half-British graduate of American University in Cairo when she was just 17 years old. They have two sons, Alaa and Gamal. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. From left to right, King Hussein of Jordan, U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak walk through the colonnades of the White House, on February 14, 1984 for a working lunch. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Mubarak meets with Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres at Ras El-Tinn palace in Alexandria, Egypt on September 11, 1986. This was the first meeting between the two countries leaders since 1981 and began a thawing of relations and renewed peace efforts in the Middle East. Egypt had it's memembership suspended from the Arab League due to Sadat's peace treaty with Israel. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Mubarak, cemter, is flanked by his Defense Minister Field Marshall Abdel-Halim Abu Ghazala, left, and Chief of Staff Lieutenant General Ibrahim Orabi, right, during a visit to the tomb of the Unknown Soldier, April 24, 1986. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Police hold back Egyptians shouting slogans in favor of President Mubarak outside the polling station where he cast his vote in parliamentary elections in Cairo, April 6, 1987. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Mubarak poses for a picture with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and Yasser Arafat, chairman of Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), and during a mini Arab-summit in Baghdad, October 23, 1988. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Egypt celebrates its re-admission to the Arab League with a politically star-studded motorcade in Alexandria, Egypt on June 15, 1989. Pictured from left to right are North Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, Jordanian King Hussein and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Egypt was re-admitted as a full member of the Arab League and the League's headquarters were relocated to their original location in Cairo. (Mike Nelson / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. Mubarak jokes with Libyan leader Colonel Moammar Gadhafi upon his arrival at the Benghazi airport, August 27, 1991. (Jonathan Bainbridge / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Syrian President Hafez al-Assad, left, says goodbye to Mubarak in Latakia, Syria, July 8, 1993. President Mubarak flew to Syria to discuss peace talks between the Arab states and Israel. At a joint press conference Assad said his country would not abandon the talks with Israel. (SANA via AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Tighten that tie: President Bill Clinton and Middle East leaders get ready to meet the public on September 28, 1995, from left to right: Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, Jordan's King Hussein and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat. The group was preparing to do the official signing of the Israeli - Palestinian Interim Agreement on the West Bank and Gaza Strip at the White House. Less than two months later, on November 4, 1995, Rabin was assassinated by a right-wing radical Israeli who opposed his signing of the Oslo Accords. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. The windscreen shows the impact from a bullet on a car by gunmen who tried to assassinate Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak June 26, 1995 as his motorcade drove from Addis Ababa airport in Ethiopia on his way to the opening of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) summit of African leaders. Two of the gunmen were killed, and one wounded when security men shot back at the attackers. Mubarak returned to Cairo following the attack. (Alexander Joe / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Mubarak speaks with the Yemen President, Ali Abdullah Saleh during their meeting in the presidential palace in Cairo on March 30, 1996. By 2011, both leaders would be ousted by popular revolt. (Amr Nabil / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad meets with his Mubarak in Cairo March 20, 2002. The two leaders discussed a Saudi Middle East peace initiative and Iraq, in preparation for an Arab summit. Bashar took over the leadership of Syria from his father, Hafez, after he died in 2000. (Marwan Naamani / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. Mubarak shares a laugh with General Tommy Franks, then-commander of the U.S. forces in the Gulf, on March 11, 2003. Within days of this photo, Franks led U.S. troops in the 2003 invasion of Iraq and the eventual overthrow of Saddam Hussein. Though Egypt supported the coalition during the Gulf War in 1991, Mubarak spoke out against the 2003 Iraq War and said that it would cause, "100 Bin Ladens." (Marwan Naamani / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Mubarak wipes his face with his handkerchief during a nationally televised speech to Parliament in Cairo, Nov. 19, 2003. President Murbarak's speech was interupted for more than 30 minutes because of what was described as a "health crisis." The picture was cut and replaced by images from his early years in office and songs praising him leading viewers to believe he had died. President Mubarak resumed his address amid cheers from lawmakers. (Egyptian TV via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. President George W. Bush points to the podium after a group photograph with Middle East leaders at the Four Seasons resort in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt on June 3, 2003. The leaders pictured from left to right are Jordan's King Abdullah II, Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, Bahrain's King Hamad and Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas. (Luke Frazza / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. Egypt’s Ghad Party leader Ayman Nur, one of nine candidates running against Mubarak in the 2005 presidential election, arrives at his first campaign rally on August 17, 2005. Nur promised his supporters he would completely revamp the constitution and establish a parliamentary democracy. The 2005 elections were the first to feature multiple candidates for president, not just a referendum. Widespread fraud tainted the election and Nur contested the results, in which he placed second. He was convicted of forgery and sentenced to five years in prison. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. Mubarak's wife, Suzanne with their sons Gamal, center and Alaa, right, in Sallum, on the border with Libya in northwestern Egypt, March 29, 2006. Gamal was rumored to have been Mubarak's likely successor. (Amro Maraghi / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Mubarak in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. on September 1, 2010. The relationship between Mubarak’s regime and the U.S. came under intense pressure during the popular uprising in 2011. Obama was caught between supporting the democratic aspirations of the protesters and trying to ensure a stable transition in the longtime Middle East ally. Mubarak’s refusal to step down for weeks, while his regime violently cracked down on civilian protesters, put pressure on Obama to publically call for Mubarak to relinquish power. After Mubarak finally stepped down on Feb. 11, 2011, Obama praised the protesters, saying they were models of nonviolence that had “bent the arc of history.” (Jason Arnold / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. An Egyptian woman cries as she celebrates the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country over to the military, on the evening of Feb. 11, in Tahrir Square, Cairo. (Tara Todras-Whitehill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. The two sons of ex-President Hosni Mubarak, Gamal, left, and Alaa Mubarak, right, arrive to the police academy courthouse in Cairo, June 2, 2012. The two brothers were acquitted of corruption charges, but still face separate trial on charges of insider trading. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak behind bars and lying on a bed, inside the court room at the police academy during his trial in Cairo, Egypt, June 2, 2012. Mubarak was sentenced to life imprisonment after a court found him guilty of complicity in the killing of peaceful protesters during the 2011 uprising. The judge however, said that Mubarak, and his two sons, Alaa and Gamal, were found not guilty of corruption and influence peddling. Egypt's top prosecutor ordered that former president Hosni Mubarak be transferred from a military hospital to a prison facility near Cairo due to health issues. (EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
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Image: Hosni Mubarak sentenced to life over protester deaths
EPA file
Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak looks on, behind bars on his bed, in a cage inside the court room at the police academy during his trial in Cairo, June 2. Mubarak was sentenced to life imprisonment after a court found him guilty of complicity in the killing of protesters during the 2011 uprising.
By
updated 6/10/2012 1:09:47 PM ET 2012-06-10T17:09:47

Hosni Mubarak is slipping in and out of consciousness eight days after the ousted Egyptian leader was sent to prison to begin serving a life sentence, a security official said on Sunday.

With rumors of the former president's death spreading rapidly, authorities granted his wife, former first lady Suzanne Mubarak, and the couple's two daughters-in-law special permission to visit him in Cairo's Torah prison early that morning.

"The former president's health is in decline, but now it's stable in its deteriorated state," the official said. Since his wife's visit, Mubarak has suffered from an irregular heartbeat and required assistance in breathing.

The official told The Associated Press that the former president now lives only on liquids and yogurt. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Mubarak's health is reported to have collapsed since his June 2 conviction for failing to stop the killing of protesters during the uprising that overthrew him in 2011. His life sentence saw him transferred immediately to a prison hospital, instead of the military hospital and other facilities where he had been held since his April 2011 arrest.

Video: Protesters return to Tahrir Square (on this page)

Authorities have turned down several requests by Mubarak's family to transfer the ousted president back to a military facility, the official said.

On Saturday Mubarak's wife was denied access to the Intensive Care Unit where he was placed, as authorities limit family visitations to one a month.

Image: U.S. President Obama meeting with Egypt's President Mubarak in the Oval Office of the White House
Jason Arnold  /  Reuters file
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Egypt's Hosni Mubarak in the Oval Office of the White House on Sept. 1, 2010.

According to security officials quoted by al-Masry al-Youm daily, Mrs. Mubarak lashed out at wardens for not giving her husband permission to seek treatment outside the prison. "You will be responsible for his death," she allegedly said.

Mubarak's two sons Alaa and Gamal are also being held. They were acquitted on June 2 of corruption charges, but still face separate charges of insider trading.

On Saturday, Egypt's state run news agency MENA quoted officials as saying that Mubarak is at risk of stroke, quoting a medical team's report.

Video: Judge hands Mubarak stiff sentence (on this page)

Other media reports said that his lawyer Farid al-Deeb informed him that he will soon be transferred back to a military facility in the Cairo suburb of Maadi.

In his last public appearance on June 2, the bedridden Mubarak sat stoned-faced in the courtroom cage. However, officials said that he broke into tears when he learnt that he will be transferred to Torah prison. It took officials hours to convince Mubarak to leave the helicopter that ferried him from the courthouse to the prison.

Media reports quoted Mubarak at the time as saying the military council who took over after his ouster had deceived him. "Egypt has sold me. They want me to die here," he reportedly said.

The verdict sparked a new wave of protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians who allege the verdict was determined by political pressure from the country's military rulers, doing a favor for their former president.

They say the verdict as issued can be easily overturned in an appeal, and that the acquittals of six top security officials mean that killers of the protesters will remain unknown. Many hoped Mubarak or his top officials would be convicted of murder and receive the death penalty.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Video: Protesters return to Tahrir Square

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