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Iraq war logs in Manning case 'hit us in the face:' U.S. officer

FORT MEADE, Maryland (Reuters) - The U.S. Army was overwhelmed when WikiLeaks published more than 700,000 secret diplomatic and war documents handed over by soldier Bradley Manning, a retired officer testified in the sentencing phase of the convicted private's court-martial.Full story

Congress told of NSA surveillance reach years ago

Contrary to reports from many members of Congress claiming they were in the dark about the extent of the National Security Agency's surveillance efforts, newly declassified documents show that lawmakers were told about the bulk collection program in 2009. Full story

New Snowden leak upstages U.S. move to declassify documents

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - New revelations from former security contractor Edward Snowden that U.S. intelligence agencies have access to a vast online tracking tool came to light on Wednesday as lawmakers put the secret surveillance programs under greater scrutiny. Full story

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NSA phone spying document declassified

Manning found not guilty of aiding the enemy

U.S. to declassify documents on spy programs, surveillance court

Ailing U.S. lawyer in terrorism case seeks release from prison

Trio sentenced for using fake immigration documents

Verdict in Bradley Manning WikiLeaks case to be read on Tuesday

911 Call Documents Dad's Ten Tense Minutes of Wife's Roadside Delivery

Portugal government sticks to bailout goals in confidence motion

Prosecutors say U.S. WikiLeaks soldier was seeking notoriety

Rig owner loses round in oil spill document fight

Video

  Obama administration declassifies NSA documents

On Wednesday the administration released NSA documents revealing the government’s ability to analyze millions of phone records in the hunt for terror suspects. This comes as top NSA officials are expected to testify before the Senate in a FISA oversight hearing. Former U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel A

  Manning verdict may inhibit future leakers, legal experts say

Pfc. Bradley Manning, who sent 700,000 secret government documents to WikiLeaks, was acquitted of aiding the enemy but found guilty on 20 other counts including espionage, computer fraud and theft. NBC’s Jim Miklaszewski reports.

  Manning leaks had significant impact

Melissa Harris-Perry reports on the verdict in the military trial of Bradley Manning and the quantity of now widely known stories that were reported as a result of Manning's Wikileaks documents.

  The new right-wing plan to take down Obama

Mother Jones’s David Corn joins Rev. Al Sharpton to share new documents he’s reporting on that reveal the right-wing’s new plan to hurt President Obama and his agenda.

  Manning found not guilty of aiding the enemy, but convicted on lesser charges

A military judge found Bradley Manning not guilty of the most serious charge of aiding the enemy, but found him guilty of 19 other charges including espionage. NBC’s Jim Miklaszewski joins The Cycle with his reaction to the verdict, and later Harvard Law School’s Yochai Benkler, the expert witness i

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