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updated 9/5/2012 2:45:50 PM ET 2012-09-05T18:45:50

TMI — too much information — is a big reason why people avoid downloading certain apps on their mobile phones.

A survey of about 2,000 U.S. adults conducted by Pew Internet & American Life Project found that about 43 percent download apps to their phones. More than half (54 percent) of app users have decided to not install an app when they discovered how much personal information they needed to share in order to use it. And 30 percent have uninstalled an app because they were uncomfortable with the amount of data the app shared.

While most users understand they must "pay" for apps in exchange for data, the survey shows most people have limits, regardless of  demographics like age, sex and education. Sure, younger phone owners are much more likely than their elders to use apps — yet app users of all ages are equally likely to remove (or to avoid downloading) an app based on privacy concerns.

Men and women avoid data-hungry apps in relatively equal numbers.

While app users with at least some college experience were a bit more likely than those with a high school education to bypass apps, there were no educational differences when it comes to deleting existing apps.

Further, the device played no role in decisions about app use. Owners of both Android and iPhone devices were equally likely to delete (or avoid entirely) cellphone apps due to concerns over their personal information, Pew said.

© 2012 TechNewsDaily

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