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updated 9/19/2012 3:15:56 PM ET 2012-09-19T19:15:56

If you're among the more than 2 million people who helped Apple sell out of iPhone 5s in less than a day, congratulations! Your new gadget arrives this Friday.

But as you obsessively check your inbox for package tracking information from UPS, remember that scammers and malware distributors prey on hype and excitement.

As Websense Security Labs points out on their blog, luring customers into taking on malware with FedEx and UPS tracking emails is an old trick, but unabashed, blind excitement and anticipation as Apple fans wait for their devices to arrive will inevitably lead some people to drop their guard.

Attackers like to embed nefarious attachments and malicious links in these emails. The PDF that claims to be a shipping label may not be, and the link that says it's going to take you to your package's tracking page could take you somewhere else entirely. 

Avoid headaches and enjoy your iPhone 5 and all of your devices to the fullest by keeping a few things in mind.

Does the email contain an attachment ? Unless you ordered a shipping label, it probably shouldn't, so don't open it.

Check out the sender's address. Did it really come from UPS?

Before clicking on links, hold your mouse over it for a second. In most email clients and browsers, a box will pop up to tell you where that link really leads.

So early adopters, as you wait for that UPS email that's sure to come, be vigilant and pay attention to the details.

© 2012 SecurityNewsDaily. All rights reserved

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