Video: New Jersey hit hardest; Obama plans tour

  1. Closed captioning of: New Jersey hit hardest; Obama plans tour

    >> let's get to nbc's lester holt now. he has made his way to point pleasant beach, new jersey this morning. lester, good morning to you.

    >> reporter: savannah, good morning. you saw it from the air. this is what it looks like up close. keep in mind this goes interest community to community. point pleasant beach, the boardwalk, what's left of it. this was part of a hotel here that was along the boardwalk, popular place. sand is everywhere. places it didn't used to be pushed inland for blocks and blocks. in fact, a moment ago i realized i was standing in the middle of a swimming pool. it's now a giant sandbox. president obama will visit the jersey shore later today . governor christie will tour him around to see the damage along this battered coastline, but, of course, it's not just new jersey. this entire region took a nasty hit. unimaginable devastation and staggering scenes of damage stretching all across the northeast as families try to recover from sandy's unforgiving wrath.

    >> i'm floored by what happened.

    >> reporter: neighborhoods are ravaged. cars and home swallowed by water.

    >> it was unbelievable. i never saw anything like that in my life.

    >> shredded debris and trees ripped from the ground, knocking down power lines and leaving an open wound of heartbreak up and down the coast.

    >> it was the scariest thing i've ever seen.

    >> reporter: across 15 states millions have been left without power. new jersey, the state where sandy came ashore, was hardest hit. in seaside heights , the boardwalk's been ripped apart. the amusement park there before and after the storm. the roller coaster now in the atlantic ocean . the ocean swept so far onshore everything is now covered in sand. the governor told brian williams the jersey shore as we know it is forever changed .

    >> i'm committed to rebuilding. we're going to do it, because as you said, it is not only the heart of our economy, it's the soul of new jersey. the jersey shore is the soul of new jersey.

    >> reporter: even inland in little ferry , evacuations continued into tuesday night.

    >> you have no one to go to. water is rushing in. water is going by, and you don't know what to do.

    >> reporter: new york pummeled, too. in breezy point, more than 100 homes were destroyed by fire in the flood-ravaged coastal community.

    >> we're just devastating, blowing from one building to the next one, and those buildings were close together.

    >> reporter: in this dramatic rescue captured on video, a new york city police department helicopter plucked five adults and one child from rooftops in a flooded section of staten island . elsewhere in new york city , hundreds of thousands still without power. the stock market reopens today, but important parts of the city were crippled by flooding and debris.

    >> downtown manhattan , we had the hudson river came over the banks and was pouring in to the ground zero site.

    >> reporter: new york 's train and subway service are suspended, and it may be days before they resume. schools closed again today. that high rise collapsed crane above new york city is still dangling, an ominous reminder of sandy's lingering danger. all along the south shore of new york 's long island there's damage, home and lives lost. connecticut's coastline littered with submerged homes. sandy's impact is being felt across a large part of the country. west virginia , pounded with two feet of snow. and even lake michigan churning with dangerous high waves as the effects of the storm were felt well inland. the economic aftermath is still unfolding, but in spite of a destruction and loss, a resolve to rebuild and to reflect.

    >> i still have my life. we still have our health.

    >> reporter: when he visits with the president here along the shore today, governor christie is execs pected to talk to the president about the possibility of using the armey corps of engineers to rebuild this area. yesterday at a news conference the governor waxed on about the new jersey of his youth, the jersey shore of his youth. i think a lot of folks who come here are feeling awfully jost nick and sad, matt.

    >> lester holt , i think a lot of people agree with

NBC News and news services
updated 10/31/2012 10:23:51 AM ET 2012-10-31T14:23:51

The U.S. Navy is sending three helicopter carrier ships to the coast off New York and New Jersey to help rescue and recovery operations in the wake of superstorm Sandy, officials told NBC News.

Navy officials said USS Wasp, USS Carter Hall, and USS Mesa Verde had been ordered to head to the area to provide landing platforms for Coast Guard, National Guard and civilian agency helicopters if needed.

The Atlantic Fleet command made the decision in the name of "prudent planning," officials said.

Image: The USS Mesa Verde in 2009
Monica Rueda  /  AFP/Getty Images
The USS Mesa Verde, seen in 2009, has been ordered to go to waters off the New York and New Jersey coasts.

With six days to go before the Nov. 6 elections, President Barack Obama will visit flood-ravaged areas of the New Jersey shore, where the storm made landfall on Monday.

As his guide, he will have Republican Governor Chris Christie, a vocal backer of presidential challenger Mitt Romney who has nevertheless praised Obama and the federal response to the storm.

"Tomorrow recovery begins. Today was a day of sorrow," Christie told a news conference late Tuesday. "There's nothing wrong with that. So long as sorrow doesn't replace resilience, we'll be just fine."

Millions across the Northeast were stricken by the massive storm with ongoing power and mass transit outages around New York for several more days. However, Wall Street, airports and some businesses were reopening Wednesday.

Sandy was responsible for the deaths of at least 47 people in the United States, NBC News reported Wednesday, after killing 68 in the Caribbean. Some 6.6 million were still without power.

Image: Aerial view of New Jersey coast
Master Sgt. Mark Olsen  /  US Air Force via EPA
This handout photograph provided by the U.S. Air Force shows aerial views of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy to the New Jersey coast.

Footage from a helicopter flying over the New Jersey coastline showed fires raging among storm-damaged homes, with TODAY's Natalie Morales reporting that she counted some 25 separate points of flame.

She speculated that fractured natural gas pipes or downed electrical lines could have caused the fires. Emergency dispatchers in Bricktown, N.J., told NBC News they were dealing with fires in the area.

Boats that Morales said had been "tossed as if toys" could be seen piled up next to wrecked houses in the area.

Meanwhile, Sandy pushed inland, dumping several feet of snow in the Appalachian Mountains -- nearly 30 inches was recorded in Red House, Md. -- and then headed into Canada Wednesday.

Sandy by the numbers

BreakingNews.com's coverage of Sandy

The National Weather Service said "remnants of Sandy continue to weaken over Pennsylvania," in a 5 a.m. Wednesday update.

However, it said gale warnings and small craft advisories were in place for parts of the Great Lakes.

"Flood and coastal flood watches, warnings and advisories are in effect over portions of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast states," the notice said.

Winter storm warnings and advisories remained in effect for parts of southwest Pennsylvania, western Maryland, West Virginia, eastern Tennessee, eastern Kentucky, and extreme western North Carolina. A further 2 to 4 inches of snow were expected in the mountains of West Virginia into western Maryland and southwestern Pennsylvania.

And dangerous surf condition were expected to continue from Florida to New England for the next couple of days, the NWS added.

Video: Fire rages on Sandy-stricken Jersey Shore (on this page)

Sandy caused waves up to two-stories high in the Great Lakes Tuesday, forcing massive cargo ships -- some longer than three football fields – to seek shelter.

"We don't stop for thunderstorms and flurries," said Glen Nekvasil, spokesman for the Lake Carriers' Association, which represents U.S.-flagged cargo ships on the Great Lakes. "The lakes don't have to be perfectly flat. It has to be a significant weather event for ships to go to anchor or stay in port. But this was just too much."

Sandy leaves trail of destruction, disbelief in its path

Subway tracks and commuter tunnels under New York City, which carry several million people a day, were under several feet of water. The lower half of Manhattan remained without power after a transformer explosion at a Con Edison substation Monday night.

Slideshow: Recovering after Sandy (on this page)

Hit with a record storm surge of nearly 14 feet of water, New York City likely will struggle without subways for days, authorities said. Buses were operating on a limited basis.

Officials with New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority said they would release a timetable of their recovery plans sometime on Wednesday.

Sandy leaves NYC subway system, infrastructure licking its wounds

Officials planned to reopen financial markets on Wednesday and on Broadway, most shows “will go on,” Charlotte St. Martin, executive director of The Broadway League, said in a statement on its website.

Video: Entertainment for stranded tourists in Times Sq. (on this page)

Two of the area's three major airports -- John F. Kennedy International in New York and Newark Liberty International -- planned to reopen with limited service on Wednesday.

New York's LaGuardia Airport was flooded and remained closed. Nearly 19,000 flights have been canceled since Sunday, according to flight tracking service FlightAware.com.

Sunday’s New York Marathon is still on, but weather.com pointed out that “flying in runners from out of town will be tricky, and there may not be a subway to get everyone to the starting line.”

Image: Residents make their way through flood waters brought on by Hurricane Sandy in Little Ferry, NJ
Adam Hunger  /  Reuters
Residents make their way through floodwaters in Little Ferry, N.J., on Tuesday.

In New Jersey, Christie took a helicopter tour of the Jersey shore on Tuesday and saw boats adrift, boardwalks washed away, roads blocked by massive sand drifts and other destruction. He stopped in the badly damaged resort towns of Belmar and Avalon.

"I was just here walking this place this summer, and the fact that most of it is gone is just incredible," he said at one stop.

Christie said it could be seven to 10 days before power is restored statewide. He said residents could not yet return to homes on the shore's battered barrier islands.

Thousands of residents of Hoboken, N.J., just across the Hudson River from Manhattan, were stranded in their homes due to flooding, the mayor said.

Dawn Zimmer, mayor of Hoboken, said half the city remained flooded Tuesday night.

"We have, probably, about 20,000 people that still remain in their homes, and we're trying to put together an evacuation plan, get the equipment here," Zimmer told MSNBC TV.

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NBC News' Jim Miklaszewski, Reuters and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Photos: Recovery

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  1. Hundreds of people affected by Sandy wait in line for distributions from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Red Cross and other aid organizations on Nov. 17 in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn. FEMA says it is extending, by a month, a program providing temporary housing to New Yorkers displaced by Superstorm Sandy. (Bebeto Matthews / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. A volunteer checks Donald Vaughn, who had not been able to keep a dialysis appointment, in his apartment at a public housing facility in the Rockaway section of the Queens borough of New York on Nov. 17. Some residents have struggled to get their lives back to normal more than two weeks after Hurricane Sandy since some essential services have yet to return to parts of the city. (Eric Thayer / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Contractors dig several feet of sand out of a garage after it was deposited by the storm surge from Sandy in Mantoloking, N.J. on Nov. 16. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Destroyed rides sit on the beach from the Funtown Pier on Nov. 16 in Seaside Heights, N.J. Two amusement piers and a number of roller coasters were destroyed in the seaside town by Sandy. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. A surfer heads out into the water in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away on Nov. 16, in the Queens borough of New York City. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. President Barack Obama and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, left, talk with a man inside the distribution tent as they tour a FEMA recovery center in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy on Staten Island in New York on Nov. 15, 2012. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-NY, is at right. Obama got a look Thursday at the devastation that Sandy waged on New York City, flying over flood-ravaged Queens before landing in Staten Island to meet storm victims who lost homes and loved ones. (Mandel Ngan / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Rosemary McDermott and her husband Anthony Minor react as they open a safe containing a family genealogy they were able to salvage from the basement of her mother's home in the Breezy Point section of Queens, N.Y., on Nov. 15, 2012. A fire destroyed more than 100 homes in the oceanfront community during Superstorm Sandy. At left are Todd Griffin and Kevin Striegle, volunteers with Adventures in Missions, who helped find the safe beneath the debris. (Mark Lennihan / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. People receive free clothing at the Ocean Bay Action Center on Nov. 15, 2012, in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens in New York City. More than two weeks after Superstorm Sandy, residents are still lining up for free clothing and food as emergency workers continue to restore power, water and heat to the battered community. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Patrick Wall, house manager at Coney Island USA, cleans a vintage player piano damaged in the flooding of the buildings that house the Coney Island Circus Sideshow and the Coney Island Museum on Nov. 15, 2012, in Brooklyn, New York City. Staff and volunteers are working to restore what can be saved following Superstorm Sandy. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Homeowner Rob Ostrander talks on the phone in front of his Hurricane Sandy damaged home in the Brooklyn borough region of Belle Harbor, N.Y., Nov. 14. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. A worker looks up at a hole in the foundation caused by Hurricane Sandy to the home of Leslie Mahoney in the Brooklyn borough of Belle Harbor, N.Y., Nov. 14. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Lisa Baney walks back toward her family's home after taking a photo of a neighbor's destroyed home on Nov. 14, in Bay Head, N.J. Many residents of the hard hit seaside town remain without power. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. A living room is filled with sand washed in by Superstorm Sandy on Nov. 14, in Point Pleasant Beach, N.J. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. A man looks up at a building along the destroyed section of boardwalk on Nov. 14, in Point Pleasant, N.J. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Workers pause to look at a home that has been pushed on top of a work truck by the storm surge of Hurricane Sandy in the Brooklyn borough of Belle Harbor N.Y., Nov. 14. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. A candle is handed out to residents in need from a group called Dream Center in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood in Queens, N.Y. on Nov.14. Two weeks after Superstorm Sandy slammed into parts of New York and New Jersey, thousands are still without power and heat. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. An New York police officer jumps over a chasm in the boardwalk caused by the storm surge of Hurricane Sandy in Belle Harbor, N.Y., Nov. 14. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Louise McCarthy carts belongings from her flood-damaged home as she passes the charred ruins of other homes in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough of New York, Nov. 14. A fire destroyed more than 100 homes in the oceanfront community during Superstorm Sandy. (Mark Lennihan / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. Heavy equipment operator Bill Unger carries photos he salvaged from a mass dump of household possessions on Nov. 13, in the Midland Beach area of the Staten Island, N.Y. Unger has been helping to remove Hurricane Sandy debris for the city and collecting photos along the way. He takes them to his daughter, who is posting them on Facebook for neighborhood residents to find online and later collect. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. A woman steps down off a damaged section of boardwalk in the Rockaway neighborhood of New York City, Nov. 13. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. CVS workers stock the shelves of a temporary store being constructed in front of a damaged CVS location in the Rockaway Beach neighborhood of Queens, New York, Nov. 12. Most stores in the area have been damaged or destroyed. (Andrew Gombert / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. A home that was damaged by Superstorm Sandy is seen in Union Beach, N.J., on Nov. 12. (Eric Thayer / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. An insurance claims adjuster climbs the entrance to a house in the Breezy Point neighborhood on Nov. 12, which was left devastated by Superstorm Sandy in New York City's Queens borough. (Adrees Latif / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. Chris Schmidt works on ripping out damaged wood in a friend's home, as a fire burns in the fireplace, on Nov. 12. People in the area continue to deal with the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in the Oakwood Beach neighborhood of Staten Island, N.Y. (Justin Lane / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. Members of the U.S. Army's 62nd Medical Brigade Preventive Medicine Detachment take water samples during early morning fog in Breezy Point, on Nov. 12. The neighborhood was left devastated by Superstorm Sandy in New York City's Queens borough. (Adrees Latif / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. People line up to receive donated items from Catholic Charities of Brooklyn and Queens in the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church, in Brooklyn's Red Hook neighborhood, on Nov. 12. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. A woman carries her dog while walking through charred homes in Breezy Point, on Nov. 12. (Adrees Latif / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. A resident looks through a destroyed house in Union Beach, N.J., on Nov. 12. (Eric Thayer / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. Streets damaged during Superstorm Sandy are seen in Ortley Beach, N.J., on Nov. 10. (Tim Larsen / Governor's Office via Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. People gather for free donated food beneath a spotlight in an area without power on Nov. 12, in the Rockaway neighborhood in New York City's Queens borough. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  31. A young girl rejoices as she finds a doll, while she and her mother search through piles of clothes and other items donated for victims of Superstorm Sandy, on a sidewalk on the south side of Staten Island, on Nov. 12. (Mike Segar / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  32. Seabee EOCN Courtney McCormack, left, grabbed a shovel and started digging out the sand that had washed up against the house as others in the group grabbed the waterlogged debris to begin a 100 yard walk out of the neighborhood to a large trash pile in Breezy Point, N.Y. on Nov. 12. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  33. A cyclist passes piles of debris on Nov. 10, as clean-up continues where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  34. Community pet rescuer Kim Ruiz stands among the cats, five of whom were rescued during Superstorm Sandy, and dogs she houses in her unheated apartment without electricity in the Far Rockaway neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York City on Nov. 9. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  35. Mac Baker heats pots of water on the floor with small flames for a bit of warmth in her unheated apartment on Nov. 9, with her niece Nytaisha Baker in the Ocean Bay public housing projects in the Far Rockaway neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  36. Volunteer Christine Wakefield organizes donated goods Nov. 9, in a Metropolitan Transit Authority bus in the Midland Beach neighborhood of Staten Island, N.Y. (Andrew Burton / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  37. David Sylvester searches through the remains of his house, which was flooded and then burned to the ground during Hurricane Sandy, for the corpses of his five cats in the Midland Beach neighborhood in Staten Island, N.Y., on Nov. 9. (Andrew Burton / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  38. Dean Rasinya takes a break from cleaning his damaged home on Nov. 8 in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens in New York City. Rasinya's house still stands, just at the edge of the fire's reach, near the area where there was a huge blaze that destroyed over 100 homes in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Rasinya has lived in the neighborhood for 35 years and intends to rebuild. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  39. U.S. Marines from the 8th Engineer Support Battallon out of Camp Lejeune, N.C., attempt to start a generator which they will use to pump out floodwater from an overnight storm on Nov. 8 in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, N.Y. The Breezy Point neighborhood was heavily damaged by Superstorm Sandy. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  40. David Sylvester, 50, stands in front of the remains of his house in the Midland Beach neighborhood on Staten Island in New York City on Nov. 8. Sylvester and his wife Joanne lost their five cats when their home caught fire after Hurricane Sandy flooded their neighborhood. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  41. Theresa Goddard, her apartment still without electricity, is overwhelmed while discussing her living conditions on Nov. 8 in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York City. Even as a storm plunged temperatures below freezing, she and many other residents of the Red Hook public housing projects remain without heat and running water. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  42. A damaged house sits in the middle of the street as the area continues to deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Breezy Point, Queens, N.Y. on Nov. 8. (Justin Lane / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  43. Snow covers debris from the cleanup after Sandy in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., on Nov. 8. Residents across the Northeast woke up on Nov. 8 to more than 200,000 new power outages and record early snow from a nor'easter that struck just 10 days after Superstorm Sandy battered the region. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  44. Ed Cardona shovels a few inches of snow from his driveway, just two hundred yards from the water, on Staten Island in New York City on Nov. 8. Cardona, who has lived here since 1989, had about three feet of water after Superstorm Sandy. "I still love the place, I'm not going anywhere. I picked up a new snowblower within the last seven months that went under water. I didn't get to use it at all, but that's OK. The family's safe, that's what's important," said Cardona. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  45. A man walks past a fallen tree in Roslyn Heights, N.Y., Nov. 8. (Shannon Stapleton / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  46. People wait in line to buy gasoline during a snowstorm on Nov. 7 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The city is still experiencing long gas lines in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  47. Snow blows past debris and non-functioning streetlights on Nov. 7 in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens, N.Y. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  48. A man helps another person climb down from a destroyed section of boardwalk after they checked the storm's approach in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., on Nov. 7. The Rockaway Peninsula was especially hard hit by Superstorm Sandy and some evacuated ahead of the nor'easter. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  49. Volunteers walk through falling snow while bringing food to residents of homes damaged by Superstorm Sandy on Nov. 7 in the Staten Island borough of New York City. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  50. Snow falls as Eddie Saman clears out destroyed household belongings from his flood-damaged home on Nov. 7 in the Staten Island borough of New York City. He and fellow residents of the low-lying New Dorp area of Staten Island had been advised to evacuate ahead of the arrival of a storm that could potentially reflood areas devastated by Superstorm Sandy. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  51. U.S. Marines work to clean up debris on Nov. 7 in the Staten Island borough of New York City. (John Moore / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  52. U.S. Postal Service mail carrier Kenneth Henn delivers mail to a residence along Ocean Ave. at 15th Street in the evacuated section of Belmar, N.J., on Nov. 7. Machines pile sand along Ocean Ave. in the background. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  53. Linemen install a transformer on Nov. 7 to help restore power in the Staten Island community of Oakwood Beach in New York City. The linemen were from Chain Electric, a contract utility crew that drove in from Mississippi to help out. (Paul J. Richards / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  54. Dave Young, left, and Joe Callan, front right, help friend and fellow FDNY firefighter Kieran Burke, background, search for his wife's engagement ring, a family heirloom, in the ashes of Burke's home on Nov. 6 in Breezy Point, N.Y. (David Friedman / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  55. This sign and photo were nailed to one of several pilings that had held up a home in Head, N.J., until it was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. (Tom Mihalek / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  56. Heavy equipment operators work on a mountain of debris left by superstorm Sandy on Nov. 6 in Wall, N.J. (Mel Evans / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  57. Casey Brouder clears out her parents' home on Nov. 6 in Breezy Point, N.Y. (David Friedman / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  58. Members of the National Guard walk past a house damaged by Sandy as it is painted with an American flag in the New Dorp section of Staten Island, N.Y. on Nov. 6. Voting in the U.S. presidential election is the latest challenge for the hundreds of thousands of people in the New York-New Jersey area still affected by superstorm Sandy. (Seth Wenig / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  59. Poll workers Eva Prenga, right, Roxanne Blancero, center, and Carole Sevchuk try to start an optical scanner voting machine in the cold and dark at a polling station in a tent in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, N.Y., on Nov. 6. The original polling site, a school, was damaged by superstorm Sandy. (Seth Wenig / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  60. Nikolas Policastro, 20, gives a kiss to one of his five puppies while Paige Shaw of the American Red Cross pets their mother "Bella" at a shelter in the Pinelands Regional Junior High School in Little Egg Harbor, N.J. on Nov. 6. Policastro, his four brothers and his parents sought refuge at the shelter after their home in Mystic Islands was swamped with over five feet of water from Sandy. The shelter was one of the few places that the family could house their extended family of five cats, five dogs and five thee-week-old puppies. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  61. A woman and her son scramble over a tree toppled by superstorm Sandy as she accompanies him to Public School 195, in the background, in the Manhattan Beach neighborhood of Brooklyn, on Nov. 5 in New York. Nov. 5 was the first day of public school for New York City students following the storm. (Mark Lennihan / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  62. MTA employees observe a pump removing seawater from the L train's tunnel, in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy in New York City on Nov. 5. The MTA says the G and L trains are now the top priority to reopen. The signal system on the G still needs repairs, and the L tunnel under the East River is still being pumped out. (MTA via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  63. People wait at a crowded subway stop as New York City tries to recover from the after effects of Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn, N.Y. on Nov. 5. Portions of the city's transit system are still not operating due to flooding and damage from last week's hurricane causing severe crowding in areas. (Justin Lane / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  64. Lakota Serpica, 8, does her part to help organize donations for people affected by Sandy in Midland Beach in Staten Island, N.Y. on Nov. 5. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  65. Marines with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit out of Camp Lejeune, N.C. arrive in Staten Island, N.Y. on Nov. 5. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  66. In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, garbage lies piled on the street in the New Dorp neighborhood of Staten Island, N.Y., on Nov. 4. (Seth Wenig / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  67. A worker scrapes up mud and tiles from flood-damaged Saint Rose High School in Belmar, N.J., on Nov. 4. (Mel Evans / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  68. People salvage food from bags thrown out of a flooded store in the Coney Island area of Brooklyn, N.Y., on Nov. 4. Victims of Sandy on the East Coast struggled against the cold early on Sunday amid fuel shortages and power outages, even as officials fretted about getting voters displaced by the storm to polling stations for Tuesday's presidential election. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  69. Soldiers from the National Guard help to unload supplies to set up a donation distribution center for victims of Sandy, at St. Camillus School in the Rockaways area of Queens, N.Y., on Nov. 4. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  70. Rockaway residents stay warm by a fire during near-freezing temperatures on Nov. 4 in the Rockaway area of Queens, N.Y. (Allison Joyce / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  71. Members of the Coney Island Cathedral of Deliverance worship in a neighboring community center on Nov. 4 in New York City, after their church and beach community were heavily damaged by Sandy. (Mark Lennihan / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  72. New York City Marathon runners help clear debris from homes in a damaged neighborhood in the Staten Island borough of New York on Nov. 4. More than 1,000 people, many of whom had originally planned to run the marathon, crowded onto two Staten Island Ferry boats and headed to the stricken borough with relief supplies ranging from food to plastic bags. (Adrees Latif / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  73. Vincent Gearity removes water-damaged insulation in a crawl space below a home as the area continues to clean up after Hurricane Sandy in Toms River, N.J., Nov. 4. (Steve Nesius / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  74. A man takes a photograph of a home destroyed by Hurricane Sandy in Point Pleasant Beach, N.J., on Nov. 4. (Les Stone / American Red Cross via Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  75. An American Red Cross meal truck and volunteers hand out free meals in Bellmore, N.Y. on Nov. 3 (Jason Colston / American Red Cross via EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  76. A man walks near standing water and piles of sand swept onto a road from Superstorm Sandy at Rockaway Beach on Nov. 3, in the Queens borough of New York City. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  77. An NYPD helicopter air drops supplies in the New Dorp Beach section of Staten Island, N.Y. on Nov. 3. (Andrew Gombert / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  78. A man stands outside his house which was left flooded by hurricane Sandy in the Staten Island borough of New York, Nov. 3. (Adrees Latif / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  79. Volunteer Christina Wilson, left, helps clean up the kitchen of the Ventura family home, which was flooded during Superstorm Sandy, Nov. 3, in Staten Island, N.Y. A Superstorm Sandy relief fund is being created just for residents of the hard-hit New York City borough. Former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Borough President James Molinaro say the fund will help residents displaced from their homes. (Julio Cortez / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  80. Howard Goldsmith consoles his wife, Rosanna Troia, while helping clean out Troia's mother's home in the Midland Beach neighborhood of Staten Island on Nov. 3. As clean-up efforts from Superstorm Sandy continue, colder weather and another storm predicted for next week are beginning to make some worried. (Andrew Burton / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  81. Volunteers deliver blankets to residents affected by Hurricane Sandy in the Staten Island borough of New York, Nov. 3. (Keith Bedford / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  82. A member of the National Guard fills up a gas tank at the Armory on Nov. 3, in the Staten Island borough of New York City. New Jersey has begun rationing gas and the Department of Defense will be setting up mobile gas stations in New York City and Long Island. (Andrew Burton / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  83. A man looks over the remains of a home in the Staten Island borough of New York, Nov. 3. (Keith Bedford / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  84. People clean the boardwalk of sand washed in by Superstorm Sandy in low-lying historic Coney Island on Nov. 3, in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  85. Roxanne Boothe uses a flashlight as she walks through a hallway in Sam Burt Houses, where she is president of the tenants' association, on Nov. 3 in Coney Island, N.Y. The complex, which has been without power since Oct. 29, flooded during superstorm Sandy and a 90-year-old woman who had lived there for more than 40 years drowned on the first floor. "We have no heat, no water, no electricity, it’s dark in the whole building," said Boothe, who was frustrated that the Red Cross and FEMA assistance has not reached her neighborhood. (Bebeto Matthews / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  86. Collins Wimbish, left, and Margaret Girgaud cook food over a fire in a barrel in the Rockaways neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., Nov. 3. (Justin Lane / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  87. Jeff Kulikowski, left, sits on a bench on the boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge as the city tries to recover from the after effects of Hurricane Sandy in the Rockaways neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., Nov. 3. Large areas of the city are still without power or functioning stores to buy food and water. (Justin Lane / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. Image:
    Bebeto Matthews / AP
    Above: Slideshow (87) Recovering after Sandy - Recovery
  2. Image: Repair and restoration work on the New York City subway system
    Leonard Wiggins / Metropolitan Transportation Authority via EPA
    Slideshow (176) Recovering after Sandy - Aftermath
  3. Image: A general view shows the skyline of lower Manhattan in darkness after a preventive power outage caused by giant storm Sandy in New York
    Eduardo Munoz / Reuters
    Slideshow (100) Recovering after Sandy - Hurricane

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