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updated 10/31/2012 2:22:01 PM ET 2012-10-31T18:22:01

This week we saw heartbreaking images of pre-term babies being carried out of harm's way by staff from NYU hospital and were reminded just how fragile newborn babies are. From something as serious as ventilators to band-aids, specials measures have to be taken to protect these little ones.

Researchers from Brigham and Women's hospital have created a new kind of adhesive that will take the pain out of medical tape removal.

Patients with thin skin, included prematurely born babes and the elderly, are very susceptible to pain and skin tearing from strong medical tape. The new adhesive from the hospital quickly releases without removing body hair or skin.

Standard tape detaches right where the skin meets the tape, which can leave adhesive behind, but this one has multiple layers that make the tape strong, but easy to remove.

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To best visualize how the tape works, think about a split branch you might find on a hiking trail. The way the layers of the wood break apart from one another happens more quickly if you pull it along the grain rather than against it, right?

The tape works the same way, however, if pulled in the opposite direction; it maintains its strength. If any adhesive is left over, it can be easily rubbed off.

No news on when or where this tape will be used. It's already been tested, so hopefully, it won't be long until "ouchless" medical tape is a reality.

© 2012 Discovery Channel

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