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Vt. revenues down for June, up for year

Vermont state revenues were off for the month of June, but came in more than $26 million stronger than expected for the fiscal year that ended June 30. Full story

Wal-Mart U.S. sales weak; outlook below analysts' forecast

(Reuters) - Wal-Mart Stores Inc <WMT.N> posted weaker-than-expected quarterly earnings on Thursday due to poor U.S. sales and said its profit for this quarter might also miss Wall Street's forecast as it spends more on its foreign bribery probe, e-commerce and international operations. Full story

Tax refund scams fueled by identity theft

   The number of tax fraud cases due to identity theft has risen dramatically in recent years, but both local and federal authorities have spent the last few months targeting the thieves. NBC’s Victoria Rivers reports from Washington.

Delayed tax refunds hurt Family Dollar results

(Reuters) - Family Dollar Stores Inc <FDO.N> said on Wednesday that sales have perked up as spring weather has finally arrived, but reported a weaker-than-expected quarterly profit which it blamed on a delay in shoppers getting their tax refunds. Full story

Budget gap narrows to $204 billion in February from year ago

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The monthly U.S. budget deficit narrowed in February compared to the same month a year ago, as a delay in tax refunds and lower defense spending added cash to government coffers, the Treasury Department said on Wednesday. Full story

Here's What's Working in the Retail Space

   Matthew Boss, JPMorgan analyst, explains which retailers should profit from a rebound when consumers begin spending their tax refunds early on this month.

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Articles

Wal-Mart CFO says still seeing effect of delayed tax refunds

IRS review delays tax refunds for some budget shoppers

Wal-Mart eases investors fears, U.S. shoppers feel pain

Florida hit by "tsunami" of tax identity fraud

Greece cuts investments to hit Jan budget target

Video

  Wonky Fact of the Day: Tax Refunds & Consumer Spending

CNBC's Steve Liesman offers today's wonky fact: $26 billion is the amount tax refunds through February 12th are lagging behind last year. That could impact consumer spending in the first quarter of the year.

  Tax refunds could be a casualty of the debt ceiling debate

A new analysis finds the government could reach the debt ceiling limit as soon as February 15, two weeks sooner than expected which means IRS tax refunds could be delayed.  Democratic strategist Tad Devine and MSNBC Contributor Robert Traynham discuss the impact of reaching the $16.4 trillion debt c

  82% Disapprove of Congress: NBC/WSJ Poll

A top IRS official is reporting that if Congress waits too long to resolve the fiscal cliff issues, billions in tax refunds could be delayed in 2013. Chris Edwards, Cato Institute, thinks this could be a "wake up call" for Washington, while Andrew Fiel...

  Study: IRS Pays Out Billions in Fraudulent Refunds

Over $20 billion in tax refunds may land in the hands of identity thieves in the next five years, according to a study from the Treasury's inspector general. J. Russell George, Treasury Inspector General for the IRS, weighs in.

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Related Photos

A job posting is seen on a sign outside a Wal-Mart store in Williston, North Dakota
A job posting is seen on a sign outside a Wal-Mart store in Williston, North Dakota

A job posting is seen on a sign outside a Wal-Mart store in Williston, North Dakota March 13, 2013. Wal-Mart has cashed some $2.7 billion in tax refund checks at its U.S. stores so far this year, Chief Financial Officer Charles Holley said at an investor conference that was broadcast over the intern

A man stands on a skateboard outside a Wal-Mart store in Williston, North Dakota
A man stands on a skateboard outside a Wal-Mart store in Williston, North Dakota

A man stands on a skateboard outside a Wal-Mart store in Williston, North Dakota March 13, 2013. Wal-Mart has cashed some $2.7 billion in tax refund checks at its U.S. stores so far this year, Chief Financial Officer Charles Holley said at an investor conference that was broadcast over the internet.