Data: Then and now: Breezy Point six months after Sandy

Six months after the neighborhood of Breezy Point in Queens, New York, suffered a devastating fire and flooding during Superstorm Sandy, most of the debris has been cleared, but residents are still struggling to rebuild. See the destruction after the storm, and the progress that has been made six months later.

Video: Breezy Point rebuilds, looks for answers after Sandy

Photos: Then and now: Breezy Point six months after Sandy

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  1. Bob Hauck's home on Oceanside Blvd. in Breezy Point was pushed 100 feet off its foundation by the wind and waves from Superstorm Sandy. "I’m waiting to hear what the city is going to be saying and offering and doing about restoration and rebuilding," Hauck said. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Bob Hauck's home on Oceanside Blvd. in Breezy Point was pushed 100 feet off its foundation by the wind and waves from Superstorm Sandy. "I’m waiting to hear what the city is going to be saying and offering and doing about restoration and rebuilding," Hauck said. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Bob Hauck's home (center with the flag after the storm in left photo) was pushed back 100 feet from its foundation by Sandy. Now it is gone, along with dozens of others that had to be demolished. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Bob Hauck's home (center with the flag after the storm in left photo) was pushed back 100 feet from its foundation by Sandy. Now it is gone, along with dozens of others that had to be demolished. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Kieran Burke surveyed the burned-out remains of his Breezy Point, N.Y., home on Oct. 31, 2012. Now Burke and his wife Jennifer are still searching for answers: "You know, raising the homes, it’s a simple thing. We’ve come out with the maps. We know this now. What is the delay? I mean, I’m about to have our-- my wife is about to have our second child, and I have no realistic view when we can come back home." (David Friedman / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Kieran Burke surveyed the burned-out remains of his Breezy Point, N.Y., home on Oct. 31, 2012. Now Burke and his wife Jennifer are still searching for answers: "You know, raising the homes, it’s a simple thing. We’ve come out with the maps. We know this now. What is the delay? I mean, I’m about to have our-- my wife is about to have our second child, and I have no realistic view when we can come back home." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Tom Dillon started rebuilding right after the storm hit and he and his family are living in their home again, but questions still remain. "We'd like some answers, you know, something a little faster. You know, lot of people are just rebuilding their house now and they’re going to just wait, you know, maybe two, three years and then probably raise their house, then and see what happens, because they are not going to do it until the FEMA numbers are guaranteed, set in a stone and nobody knows." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Tom Dillon started rebuilding right after the storm hit and he and his family are living in their home again, but questions still remain. "We'd like some answers, you know, something a little faster. You know, lot of people are just rebuilding their house now and they’re going to just wait, you know, maybe two, three years and then probably raise their house, then and see what happens, because they are not going to do it until the FEMA numbers are guaranteed, set in a stone and nobody knows." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. This home on 215th Street in Breezy Point was pushed off its foundation and floated half a block away before coming to rest in the middle of the street when the tide finally receded after Sandy. The house was one of the first to be demolished by the Army Corps of Engineers. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. This home on 215th Street in Breezy Point was pushed off its foundation and floated half a block away before coming to rest in the middle of the street when the tide finally receded after Sandy. The house was one of the first to be demolished by the Army Corps of Engineers. () Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Theresa Nugent surveyed the damage after the wind and waves pushed a neighbor's house into her own home. Her bungalow only suffered flood damage, but repairs are ongoing. "I have a view of the ocean when I shouldn’t because there are two houses in front of me that are no longer there. We no longer have a house on the front deck. We have insulation throughout. The walls have been gutted and reframed and sheetrock has been put up." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Theresa Nugent surveyed the damage after the wind and waves pushed a neighbor's house into her own home. Her bungalow only suffered flood damage, but repairs are ongoing. "I have a view of the ocean when I shouldn’t because there are two houses in front of me that are no longer there. We no longer have a house on the front deck. We have insulation throughout. The walls have been gutted and reframed and sheetrock has been put up." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Last November the main Breezy Point town parking lot was the central point for volunteers, donated food and relief supplies. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. Last November the main Breezy Point town parking lot was the central point for volunteers, donated food and relief supplies. (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. In November 2012, the "New York Says Thank You Foundation" placed over 2,000 had painted Stars of Hope" in fourteen communities affected by Superstorm Sandy, including Breezy Point. Most of the debris has been removed, but some of the stars remain. At least one resident realizes that this will be a long-term recovery effort. Theresa Nugent noted, "This place will not be the same this summer and it probably won’t be the same for quite some time. I believe this summer of 2013 will be the summer of rebuild and renewal." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. In November 2012, the "New York Says Thank You Foundation" placed over 2,000 had painted "Stars of Hope" in fourteen communities affected by Superstorm Sandy, including Breezy Point. Most of the debris has been removed, but some of the stars remain. At least one resident realizes that this will be a long-term recovery effort. Theresa Nugent noted, "This place will not be the same this summer and it probably won’t be the same for quite some time. I believe this summer of 2013 will be the summer of rebuild and renewal." (John Makely / NBC News) Back to slideshow navigation
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