By
Jansing & Co.
updated 5/23/2013 12:20:42 PM ET 2013-05-23T16:20:42

In the third case of sexual misconduct in the military in the past couple of months Army Sgt. Michael McClendon is accused of planting a hidden camera in the showers and locker rooms at West Point to record female cadets.

In the third case of sexual misconduct in the military in the past couple of months Army Sgt. Michael McClendon is accused of planting a hidden camera in the showers and locker rooms at West Point to record female cadets. Pentagon officials have relieved him of his duties and transferred him to Fort Drum, an army base in northern New York.

McClendon’s suspension follows two cases of other men in charge of sexual assault prevention in the military being accused of assaults themselves.

“Obviously he’s an idiot,” said Colonel Jack Jacobs, a Medal of Honor recipient and West Point instructor,  on Jansing & Co. Thursday.

Jacobs said there are a number of factors that can contribute to alleged cases like this one, including: lack of supervision, a lack of command emphasis, and complacency.

“I think when you have these cases over and over again and there’s no response and there’s no accountability for these kinds of rapes and crimes it allows the culture to continue,” Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said on NBC’s Today Thursday.

Former Army Specialist BriGette McCoy, who was raped while she was in the service and testified before Congress, talked openly about sexual assault in the military.

“I think this culture has been ongoing for a while and what’s happening now is just that we’re starting to see actually what’s going on,” McCoy said on Jansing & Co.

Video: Do we need to change the culture in the military?

  1. Closed captioning of: Do we need to change the culture in the military?

    >> it's the third case of section assume misconduct in the army in the last couple of months. planting hidden cameras at west point to film female cadets. it follows two cases of men accused of assaults themselves. lawmakers just introduced two bipartisan bills to deal with the problem.

    >> a lot of bills have been introduced. they are not all the same. we are all growing the same direction.

    >> will it change the culture if they allow this to happen? also an instructor at west point, a former army specialist, who testified before congress about her rate while serving in the military. good morning to both of you.

    >> good morning.

    >> let me start with what happened at west point. we're talking about a decorated combat veteran with a bronze star in iraq accused of taping at least a dozen women.

    >> as stockbrokers will tell you, past returns are no predictor of future performance and no matter how hard you try, once in a while a bad apple will get through and there's no accounting for stupidity. obviously he's an idiot. that's all i can say.

    >> how does something like this happen?

    >> a lack of supervision, a lack of command emphasis. sometimes you get really complacent. it doesn't matter how much. the chain of command pounds on the table.

    >> it is part of a big question and the culture military.

    >> there's no response and there's no accountability for these kinds of rates of crimes. it allows the culture to continue.

    >> tell us about the culture that you think contributes to this.

    >> well, i think this culture has been ongoing for a while and what is happening now and this sergeant, he has had this type of behavior in the past. i'm seeing from posts on the web, this was his type of behavior that's just coming to the surface now, probably because of all of the media and attention. it's taking media and attention to get this up and out and not the military chain of command .

    >> yeah, why is that? because we've been hear, when these cases come up over the years, and the majority of them are not even reported, that people are afraid of repercussions. they always say it's terrible, it can't happen, shouldn't happen and yet the numbers keep going up.

    >> well, a close society like the military that polices itself, it's extremely easy to fall into a situation in which commanders and subboaordinates feel it's too late. people don't supervise people and so on. what has to change and what is going to change is the attitude of the higher level people that actually make things happen. you see, the secretary of defense probably incensed and the guy who is really annoyed about this more than anybody because he thought he had a handle on it was ray owed scenario. i think p command emphasis is what you're going to get now.

    >> do you think that will be a big step toward this? i mean, one of the proposals that we just saw was announced a few minutes ago, that even for the first charge, if you're found to have sexually assaulted someone, you were dishonorably discharged, no ifs, and, or buts, no going up the chain. but the most important question is, how do you stop it?

    >> well, you don't let sexual offenders in the military in the first place. i mean, that's one way to stop it. and then, again, with the prosecution portion of it, you make sure that they don't continue to have this behavior so you get rid of them, get them out of the military as quickly as possible. but you still have to have them on the national sex offender registry . you can't just let them out into civilian population where the civilian population doesn't know.

    >> all that's true and i would add one more thing. commanders have to recognize that they are responsible for everything that happens or fails to happen in the units and that includes the personal behavior and the living styles of the people who work for the commanders at all levels, need to make sure that they are as close to the troops.

    >> colonel jack jacobs and brigette mccompy. thank you.

    >>> great doodle moment, reflecting the moment that her dad returned from combat. the tweet of the day was, my best day ever . her father had been serving in iraq for

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