Video: Tulsa serial rapist

updated 10/10/2005 11:39:42 AM ET 2005-10-10T15:39:42
TRANSCRIPT

The city of Tulsa, Oklahoma is being terrorized by a serial Rapist.  For the last two years a man has been breaking into homes and assaulting girls as young as 2 years old.

Tulsa authorities have confirmed that at least 7 such attacks have been perpetrated by the same man.

As the intensive manhunt continues, Tulsa Police Chief Dave Been and Former FBI Profiler Clint Van Zandt joined Dan Abrams to discuss the case.

To read an excerpt of their conversation, continue to the text below. To watch the video, click on the "Launch" button to the right.

DAN ABRAMS, HOST, 'ABRAMS REPORT':  Authorities on the hunt for a serial rapist in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  Tonight police are waiting for DNA results to determine whether a serial rapist struck again over the weekend, this time, sexually assaulting a 2-year-old girl.  They suspect he got in through an unlocked bedroom window early Saturday morning while her mom slept in the next room, then brought the toddler back to her room after sexually assaulting her. 

Tulsa police think the attacker may be the same serial rapist they have been tracking for nearly two years, seen here in various sketches released by police.  They believe this man has attacked at least seven times.  His M.O., breaking into homes through unlocked windows or doors, usually in the early morning hours, sexually assaulting very young female victims as their family members sleep nearby.

The victims range in age from it seems maybe 2 to 20.  Police believe he‘s a white male with brown hair, 20‘s or 30‘s, stocky build, somewhere between 5‘7” and 6 foot.  Joining us now is Chief Dave Been, chief of the Tulsa Police Department and former FBI profiler and MSNBC analyst Clint Van Zandt.

All right, Chief, how convinced are you that all of these rapes are connected? 

DAVE BEEN, TULSA POLICE CHIEF:  We‘re sure that seven of them are by the same person and very shortly we‘ll confirm whether or not the one with the 2 ½-year-old child over the weekend was committed by the same person, but we know of seven.  We also suspect that there may be nine to 10 other ones ranging from attempted molestation to rape to crimes that weren‘t carried through, may very well be committed by the same person. 

ABRAMS:  So we‘re talking February 2004, an 18-year-old, May 2004, a 4-year-old, July 2004, 15, August 2004, a 20-year-old, August—October 2004, an 11-year-old, May 2005, 12-year-old, July 2005 a 6-year-old.  Is it the DNA matches in all these cases? 

BEEN:  Well it‘s something obviously we won‘t get into the exact reason, but we do know we can confirm those seven.  And again, you know, it is the modus operandi of the person, the method—they get into the house, how they act, how they treat the victim.  In the case where there were older people who can relate what actually went on with the conversation, we take that all into account as we look at all of those situations. 

ABRAMS:  And Chief, you‘re expecting that the sexual assault on this 2-year-old is going to be linked up to this guy as well? 

BEEN:  Yes, sir.  Everything seems to be right in line with those other seven cases.  And again, very similar to probably nine or 10 other cases over actually more than a two-year period now.

ABRAMS:  All right.  Clint Van Zandt, look, you had to deal with this a lot in terms of sketches and profiling.  A lot of these sketches look different from one another.  They don‘t all look exactly like the same person. 

CLINT VAN ZANDT, FORMER FBI PROFILER:  Well Dan, number one, you and I know one of the worst forms of identification there is, is eyewitness identification.  And of course, this is coming just as you suggest, from anywhere from somebody 20 to somebody 4 years old and most of the assaults, as I understand it, take place during the night after midnight up to 5:00 or 6:00 a.m. in the morning.  So the victims are being perhaps wakened out of a sound sleep and are being confronted like this.  I think it‘s understandable that this fleeting glimpse they have of their assailant may not match. 

ABRAMS:  Chief, are the children in these cases the ones helping to create these sketches? 

BEEN:  Yes, sir, the victims are.  And again he‘s perfectly right.  It‘s—in the cases we have it‘s from 4 to 20 years old and again, eyewitnesses, especially when there is a victim, especially when it‘s a trauma such as this and again where they‘ve been awakened and it‘s dark and things, it‘s you know not as reliable obviously as other cases.  And there are some similarities, but when you look at all of these, I think it‘s the reason it‘s led to thousands of crime-stopper calls that we have received and information from citizens that we have asked for, because there are so many people that could fit this profile or this description. 

ABRAMS:  Clint, this is the type of case though that almost always gets cracked, right?

VAN ZANDT:  Well I think it‘s going to and I‘m sure the chief is throwing resource from his department and other agencies out there to do it.  You know one of the things you do in a case like this, and again, I know they would have done it, you know you start where the first rape is.  Perhaps that‘s where, that‘s where the assailant either works, lives, or something like this.

The scary thing is in my research on this case that there is the potential that this suspect is threatening his victims, say don‘t tell anybody or I will kill you.  So, again as has been suggested, there may well be other victims or other attempted victims out there that we‘re not even aware of right now. 

ABRAMS:  And that‘s what the chief was telling us too.  All right, look, the chief is on this program for a reason, so we put out the number, so we put out the sketches, the tip line number, 918-596-COPS.  COPS is 2677

That is the number.  Remember, different kinds of sketches.  Don‘t just rely on that one.  Think about it in terms of a compilation of the various sketches we‘ve been showing through this segment.  Chief, Clint Van Zandt, thanks a lot; we‘ll continue to follow this.

Watch the 'Abrams Report' for more analysis and interviews on the top legal stories each weeknight at 6 p.m. ET on MSNBC TV.

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