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First Read’s Morning Clips

OFF THE RACES: Breaking down the Des Moines Register poll

NBC's Alex Jaffe on the Des Moines Register's latest Iowa poll: "In the Des Moines Register/Bloomberg Politics poll, Sanders is now polling just seven points behind Democratic front runner Hillary Clinton, nearly doubling his share of the vote since the last survey was conducted in May. Sanders takes 30 percent support, while Clinton draws 37 percent, marking the first time she's dropped below 50 percent in the poll. Trump, meanwhile, has seen a remarkable reversal in both his support and popularity in the state since May. Back then, he was polling at just 4 percent support and his favorability was at -36 points; now, he leads the pack with 23 percent support and his favorability is at +26 points."

The New York Times notes that Iowans are worried about what a Perry aide's defection to Donald Trump's camp says about the state's reputation: "'I think it sends a perception that we’re pay-for-play, and if that’s the case, we lose credibility as the first-in-the nation caucuses,' said a top Republican official in Iowa."

"Candidates and outside groups are expected to spend $1.1 billion on digital advertising in 2016, up almost 700% from $162 million in the 2012 elections, according to Borrell Associates, an advisory firm that tracks media trends," writes the Wall Street Journal.

BIDEN: "[I]f Mr. Biden decides to run for the Democratic presidential nomination, his Senate reputation as a friend to financial institutions could be a significant obstacle, especially if he wants to make inroads with the party’s liberal base, which has become increasingly skeptical and often passionately hostile to anything connected to Wall Street,” writes the New York Times

He made a surprise appearance at an event in Delaware, NBC's Kelly O'Donnell reports.

BUSH: POLITICO, from over the weekend: "Three top Jeb Bush fundraisers abruptly parted ways with his presidential campaign on Friday, amid internal personality conflicts and questions about the strength of his candidacy, POLITICO has learned.There are different versions of what transpired. The Florida-based fundraising consultants — Kris Money, Trey McCarley and Debbie Aleksander — have said that they voluntarily quit the campaign and were still working with Bush's super PAC, Right to Rise Super PAC. Others said the three, who worked under the same contract, were let go because they were no longer needed for the current phase of the campaign."

CHRISTIE: "Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said on Saturday that if he were elected president he would combat illegal immigration by creating a system to track foreign visitors the way FedEx tracks packages."

CLINTON: A new, large tranche of Hillary Clinton's emails will be released this afternoon.

The U.S. attorney who prosecuted David Petraeus says that the comparison between his offense and Clinton's email server issue "has no merit."

She'll accept Jeanne Shaheen's endorsement in New Hampshire next weekend.

HUCKABEE: He's changed positions on birthright citizenship, now saying that he's open to ending it.

TRUMP: Over the weekend in Nashville, Trump promised to “get rid of” gangs.

And he slammed Clinton aide Huma Abedin, calling her husband Anthony Weiner a “perv,” NBC’s Kailani Koenig reports.

WALKER: His supporters are hoping for a reboot, writes the Washington Post: "These supporters say what is needed now is a return to basics, a more disciplined focus on the issues Walker long has championed in Wisconsin. They say there also needs to be a clear acknowledgment inside the campaign that the governor has yet to put to rest questions about his readiness to handle the problems and unexpected challenges that confront every president."

And in the AP: "While he's no different from any of the other Republicans struggling for attention amid the spotlight focused on billionaire businessman Donald Trump, Walker has also endured a series of setbacks of his own making since launching his campaign in mid-July."

On Meet the Press, he called the birthright citizenship debate a distraction.

And he defended his plan to fund Milwaukee's basketball arena as "fiscally responsible."

OBAMA AGENDA: Renaming Mt. McKinley

From NBCNews.com: "For more than a century, the tallest mountain on the continent was named after the 25th U.S. president, William McKinley. Now, in honor of Alaska's indigenous Athabascan people, who had always called it "Denali," President Barack Obama is changing it back, the White House said in a release Sunday."

MORE: “Over the next few days, President Barack Obama will tread gingerly on a receding glacier in the Alaskan Arctic, talk to coastal villagers whose homes are threatened by eroding shorelines and salmon fishermen whose livelihoods are endangered — all in an aggressive and high profile effort to highlight the impact of global climate change.”

From the Washington Post: “The Obama administration is developing a package of unprecedented economic sanctions against Chinese companies and individuals who have benefited from their government’s cybertheft of valuable U.S. trade secrets. The U.S. government has not yet decided whether to issue these sanctions, but a final call is expected soon — perhaps even within the next two weeks, according to several administration officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.”

"With little fanfare, the Obama administration has been pursuing an aggressive campaign to restore protections for workers that have been eroded by business activism, conservative governance and the evolution of the economy in recent decades," writes the New York Times.

NBC's Frank Thorp is keeping track of the Iran deal whip count here.

PROGRAMMING NOTES.

*** Monday’s “News Nation with Tamron Hall” line-up: Tamron Hall speaks with both Mother Jones Washington Bureau Chief and MSNBC Political Analyst David Corn and GOP Communications Expert and Partner at Maslansky + Partners Lee Carter about the latest political headlines; The Washington Post’s Editor of The Early Lead and Sports Writer Cindy Boren about the Deflategate hearing; and NBC News Meteorologist Bill Karins on the aftermath of Tropical Storm Erika.Full details in Santorum indivd cand skeds

*** Monday’s “Andrea Mitchell Reports” line-up: NBC’s Andrea Mitchell will interview Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders exclusively, the Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza and Anne Gearan and NBC’s Janet Shamlian and Chris Jansing.

*** Monday’s “Live with Thomas Roberts” line-up: Frances Rivera interviews former Trump adviser Roger Stone, former Gov. Ed Rendell (D-PA) and co-host of “Shark Tank” Kevin O’Leary about 2016 Politics and the surge of anti-establishment candidates, The Nation’s Dave Zirin about today’s Deflategate hearing, InTouch Weekly’s Kim Serafin about last night’s VMA awards.

OFF THE RACES: Breaking down the Des Moines Register poll

NBC's Alex Jaffe on the Des Moines Register's latest Iowa poll: "In the Des Moines Register/Bloomberg Politics poll, Sanders is now polling just seven points behind Democratic front runner Hillary Clinton, nearly doubling his share of the vote since the last survey was conducted in May. Sanders takes 30 percent support, while Clinton draws 37 percent, marking the first time she's dropped below 50 percent in the poll. Trump, meanwhile, has seen a remarkable reversal in both his support and popularity in the state since May. Back then, he was polling at just 4 percent support and his favorability was at -36 points; now, he leads the pack with 23 percent support and his favorability is at +26 points."

The New York Times notes that Iowans are worried about what a Perry aide's defection to Donald Trump's camp says about the state's reputation: "'I think it sends a perception that we’re pay-for-play, and if that’s the case, we lose credibility as the first-in-the nation caucuses,' said a top Republican official in Iowa."

"Candidates and outside groups are expected to spend $1.1 billion on digital advertising in 2016, up almost 700% from $162 million in the 2012 elections, according to Borrell Associates, an advisory firm that tracks media trends," writes the Wall Street Journal.

BIDEN: "[I]f Mr. Biden decides to run for the Democratic presidential nomination, his Senate reputation as a friend to financial institutions could be a significant obstacle, especially if he wants to make inroads with the party’s liberal base, which has become increasingly skeptical and often passionately hostile to anything connected to Wall Street,” writes the New York Times.

He made a surprise appearance at an event in Delaware, NBC's Kelly O'Donnell reports.

BUSH: POLITICO, from over the weekend: "Three top Jeb Bush fundraisers abruptly parted ways with his presidential campaign on Friday, amid internal personality conflicts and questions about the strength of his candidacy, POLITICO has learned.There are different versions of what transpired. The Florida-based fundraising consultants — Kris Money, Trey McCarley and Debbie Aleksander — have said that they voluntarily quit the campaign and were still working with Bush's super PAC, Right to Rise Super PAC. Others said the three, who worked under the same contract, were let go because they were no longer needed for the current phase of the campaign."

CHRISTIE: "Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said on Saturday that if he were elected president he would combat illegal immigration by creating a system to track foreign visitors the way FedEx tracks packages."

CLINTON: A new, large tranche of Hillary Clinton's emails will be released this afternoon.

The U.S. attorney who prosecuted David Petraeus says that the comparison between his offense and Clinton's email server issue "has no merit."

She'll accept Jeanne Shaheen's endorsement in New Hampshire next weekend.

HUCKABEE: He's changed positions on birthright citizenship, now saying that he's open to ending it.

TRUMP: Over the weekend in Nashville, Trump promised to “get rid of” gangs.

And he slammed Clinton aide Huma Abedin, calling her husband Anthony Weiner a “perv,” NBC’s Kailani Koenig reports.

WALKER: His supporters are hoping for a reboot, writes the Washington Post: "These supporters say what is needed now is a return to basics, a more disciplined focus on the issues Walker long has championed in Wisconsin. They say there also needs to be a clear acknowledgment inside the campaign that the governor has yet to put to rest questions about his readiness to handle the problems and unexpected challenges that confront every president."

And in the AP: "While he's no different from any of the other Republicans struggling for attention amid the spotlight focused on billionaire businessman Donald Trump, Walker has also endured a series of setbacks of his own making since launching his campaign in mid-July."

On Meet the Press, he called the birthright citizenship debate a distraction.

And he defended his plan to fund Milwaukee's basketball arena as "fiscally responsible."

OBAMA AGENDA: Renaming Mt. McKinley

From NBCNews.com: "For more than a century, the tallest mountain on the continent was named after the 25th U.S. president, William McKinley. Now, in honor of Alaska's indigenous Athabascan people, who had always called it "Denali," President Barack Obama is changing it back, the White House said in a release Sunday."

MORE: “Over the next few days, President Barack Obama will tread gingerly on a receding glacier in the Alaskan Arctic, talk to coastal villagers whose homes are threatened by eroding shorelines and salmon fishermen whose livelihoods are endangered — all in an aggressive and high profile effort to highlight the impact of global climate change.”

From the Washington Post: “The Obama administration is developing a package of unprecedented economic sanctions against Chinese companies and individuals who have benefited from their government’s cybertheft of valuable U.S. trade secrets. The U.S. government has not yet decided whether to issue these sanctions, but a final call is expected soon — perhaps even within the next two weeks, according to several administration officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.”

"With little fanfare, the Obama administration has been pursuing an aggressive campaign to restore protections for workers that have been eroded by business activism, conservative governance and the evolution of the economy in recent decades," writes the New York Times.

NBC's Frank Thorp is keeping track of the Iran deal whip count here.

PROGRAMMING NOTES. *** Monday’s “News Nation with Tamron Hall” line-up: Tamron Hall speaks with both Mother Jones Washington Bureau Chief and MSNBC Political Analyst David Corn and GOP Communications Expert and Partner at Maslansky + Partners Lee Carter about the latest political headlines; The Washington Post’s Editor of The Early Lead and Sports Writer Cindy Boren about the Deflategate hearing; and NBC News Meteorologist Bill Karins on the aftermath of Tropical Storm Erika.Full details in Santorum indivd cand skeds

*** Monday’s “Andrea Mitchell Reports” line-up: NBC’s Andrea Mitchell will interview Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders exclusively, the Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza and Anne Gearan and NBC’s Janet Shamlian and Chris Jansing.

*** Monday’s “Live with Thomas Roberts” line-up: Frances Rivera interviews former Trump adviser Roger Stone, former Gov. Ed Rendell (D-PA) and co-host of “Shark Tank” Kevin O’Leary about 2016 Politics and the surge of anti-establishment candidates, The Nation’s Dave Zirin about today’s Deflategate hearing, InTouch Weekly’s Kim Serafin about last night’s VMA awards.