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The Lid: Questions Linger After Clinton Campaign Explanation

Image: Hillary Clinton Attends Georgetown Institute For Women, Peace And Security Award Ceremony

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 22: Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks at the Hillary Rodham Clinton Awards for Advancing Women in Peace and Security at Georgetown University April 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. The awards were given to former United Nations Envoy for Afghanistan Staffan de Mistura, and Dr. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer, who served as the Chief Negotiator of the Philippines Government in the Mindanao Peace Talks. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) Win McNamee / Getty Images

Welcome to The Lid, your afternoon dose of the 2016 ethos… “Restrictive in every sense of the word,” “cramped and windowless,” and “locked” were phrases reporters used in Politico Magazine to describe covering the White House. We're looking forward to the start of "Survivor: Brady Briefing Room" this fall.

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’16 AT 30 THOUSAND

The Clinton campaign on Thursday struck back at a New York Times report that the State Department approved a business deal in 2010 that was pushed for by a Canadian mining company run by major donors to the Clinton Foundation. Highlights of their pushback include:

  1. Hillary Clinton was not involved in the State Department review
  2. The main donor referenced in the article had already sold his stake in the company at the heart of the transaction, Uranium One
  3. The State Department was just one of nine agencies involved in reviewing the deal

The rebuttal focused on the reporting of a quid pro quo, but there has been much more to the story. What about the link between Clinton’s speaking fees and the companies that donated to the Clinton Foundation? Or the Times reporting on undisclosed donations they may have been relevant to the deal? A lot of questions remain that continue to distract from the message the Clinton camp is pushing in the early days of the campaign.

POPPING ON NBC POLITICS

Attorney General Loretta Lynch was finally confirmed today, NBC’s Halimah Abdullah reports.

Hillary Clinton is being called on to testify on Benghazi as early as May, Rep. Trey Gowdy said.

“Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has become the voice and face of a Charles and David Koch priority - ending the Export-Import Bank,” NBC’s Leigh Ann Caldwell reports.

Ted Cruz led the charge against Lynch’s nomination, but did not stick around to vote against her, NBC’s Frank Thorp and Kelly O’Donnell report.

First Read lays out all the bad news that came out today related to the Clinton Foundation.

CAMPAIGN QUICK READS

CRUZ: Two prominent gay businessmen held a reception for Ted Cruz on Wednesday, and the Texas senator did not mention his opposition to same-sex marriage and said it would be fine if one of his daughter’s was gay, the New York Times reports.

FIORINA: She told Iowans that she’s going to enter the presidential race within the next “couple weeks,” the Des Moines Register reports.

RUBIO: He’s doing some double-talk behind closed doors on immigration, Buzzfeed reports.

CLINTON: NPR looks back at the campaign that started it all back in 2000.

FOR THE RECORD

“I understand that when people are running for President there's a lot of scheduling pressures.”

  • Sen. John Cornyn on Ted Cruz missing the final Loretta Lynch confirmation vote Thursday

TOMORROW’S SKED

President Barack Obama speaks at the office of the director of national intelligence.

Scott Walker attends a fundraiser in Sheldon, Iowa

Carly Fiorina continues to campaign in Iowa

Bernie Sanders holds events in South Carolina