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#RedefineAtoZ: Deepica Mutyala, the YouTube Beauty Guru Who’s Forging New Paths

NAME: Deepica Mutyala

AGE: 27

HOMETOWN: Sugar Land, TX or Houston, TX (whichever!!)

TWITTER: @deepicam / INSTAGRAM: @deepicam / FACEBOOK: Deepica Mutyala / YOUTUBE: deepicam / SNAPCHAT: deepicam

NBC Asian America asked celebrities and industry leaders to nominate individuals for our inaugural list, and Deepica Mutyala was nominated by Payal Kadakia, CEO of ClassPass: "She has the hustle, determination and passion that won't let anyone or anything stop her. I'm so excited for her to revolutionize how we think about our skin and beauty!"

Deepica Mutyala
Deepica Mutyala is a beauty vlogger who said she grew up not seeing anyone who looked like her on TV, so she's hoping to inspire more young women of color to embrace their beauty. Paulo Chun / NBC News
How do you introduce yourself?

On-air beauty expert, host, YouTube personality - that's always a tricky one though to be honest because I feel like it's ever evolving and changing which is part of what makes it all so exciting. At the end of the day, I'm an entrepreneur.

What inspires you?

So many things but at the top of the list are my parents - their story and how they came to the U.S. from India with nothing to provide my sister and me with a life they didn't have is what makes me work hard every day. They created their version of the American dream and now it's my turn to create mine which is very different from theirs. In my parent's mind, the American dream is about creating a safe and stable lifestyle for your family by getting a top of the line education because education equates to respect, and respect in America as an immigrant IS the dream.

For me, the American dream is breaking societal norms. It's about creating a path for those that was never created for me. It's about taking risks and changing the conversation.

SEE THE LIST: NBC Asian America Presents: A to Z - The 26 Emerging Voices of 2017

NBC Asian America Presents: A to Z (2017) 3:45
What challenges you?

For me, the biggest challenge is always wanting more. I never take the time to celebrate wins or slow down. I'm constantly thinking about what else I could be doing to grow my business. I want to do so much and I have so many goals but the problem I'm realizing is that if you take on too much you're not giving 100% to anything. I'm learning to say no to projects so I can really give all of my efforts into the ones I commit to.

Another big challenge for me was going from working in a large office with 100+ people I loved to working for myself. I'm an extrovert - I thrive on other people's energy and it makes me work harder. Building structure for yourself and a routine to me has been the biggest challenge as an entrepreneur but one that I've finally been able to get my head around and tackle!

Tell us about the biggest risk you ever took.

I quit my job the day I got an email from the TODAY Show to come on. It was after my second video I had ever filmed went viral and I just felt like I was looking for a sign to take the dive into this world full time - that was my sign. I could have had my viral moment be a fun 15 minutes of fame or I could take it and turn it into my dream career. I just never wanted to look back and think "what if."

What are you reading/watching/listening to these days?

I've always been someone who loved reading books written by other female entrepreneurs. I just ordered Lilly Singh's book "How To Be a Bawse" and am excited to read that!

If you weren't doing what you're doing now, what job would you want to have?

I would hope it would still be something that wasn't considered a traditional norm e.g doctor, lawyer, engineer (sorry dad). Truthfully, as long as it was a profession that allowed me to inspire others, I would be happy.

What's your motto?

Be bold - it's both my life and beauty motto. I have a neon light up sign over my bed that says this as a daily reminder.

I celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month because…

...the beauty of my culture is beyond skin deep. I spent my whole childhood trying to be someone I wasn't and I am now more proud than ever of where I came from. It's important to me that young women growing up today embrace their roots and also realize that it's their individuality that makes them unique and that's beautiful. I am honored to be part of a cultural group who is doing so much to change a space that needs evolution and will celebrate Asian Americans this month and beyond.

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