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KNOW IT ALL: Wednesday’s Top 6 Stories at NBC News

Image: TOPSHOTS-FRANCE-ATTACKS-CHARLIE-HEBDO-MAGAZINE

People wait outside a newsagents kiosk in Paris on Jan. 14, 2015, as the latest edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo went on sale. The first issue of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo to be published since a jihadist attack decimated its editorial staff last week was sold out within minutes at kiosks across France. BERTRAND GUAY / AFP - Getty Images

Good morning. Here are some of the stories we’re following today:

1. Yemen’s al Qaeda claims responsibility for Paris attacks

The terrorist group's branch in Yemen says the organization was behind last week's deadly massacre on French magazine Charlie Hebdo. A video released by top leader Nasr al-Ansi said that al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) "chose the target, laid the plan and financed the operation," according to a translated transcript. He also congratulated the brothers who carried out the attack on the satirical magazine and were killed two days later in a dramatic police raid. The video featured footage from the attack, images from the rally in Paris on Sunday, which drew millions in support of Charlie Hebdo, and of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Read more in NEWS.

2. What’s inside the new edition of Charlie Hebdo?

In a show of defiance and free speech, the staff of the weekly magazine released its latest issue Wednesday — with a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover. The staff increased its print run to 5 million copies in several languages, and vendors throughout France reported they were flying off the shelves. The opening spread of the magazine has 11 archival cartoons drawn by some of the staffers killed in the massacre last week. Read more in NEWS.

Charlie Hebdo: Paris Vendor Can't Meet Demand 0:28

3. Leak forces evacuation of International Space Station

The crew of the International Space Station were forced to evacuate the U.S. section Wednesday after a chemical leak, the American and Russian space agencies said. All crew were safe and moved to the Russian side of the facility after the leak of "harmful substances," the Russian Federal Space Agency said on its website. The U.S. section of the I.S.S. had been sealed off and the space agency was in the process of coming up with a plan to deal with the leak. Read more in SCIENCE.

4. Jihad Jane: I wanted to kill for love

What led Colleen LaRose — better known as Muslim convert "Jihad Jane" — to plot to murder a Swedish cartoonist who satirized the Prophet Muhammad? Love. In a jailhouse letter to a criminologist, LaRose gave no sense that she regrets the crimes that landed her in federal lockup for 10 years. "Why did I do what I was convicted of?" LaRose wrote in response to a query from Kimberly Mehlman-Orozco, who plans to write a book based on the correspondence. "There's many reasons, but the simplest reason is I did it for love." Read more in INVESTIGATIONS.

Why I Wrote Letters to Terrorists 3:16

5. Bartender charged over threat to poison Boehner

An ex-bartender at a country club frequented by House Speaker John Boehner was indicted this month on charges of trying to poison the congressman's drinks. According to court documents obtained by NBC News, police first made contact with Michael Robert Hoyt after an October 911 call. Hoyt — who had recently been fired from his job — told an officer that he was Jesus Christ and that he planned to kill Boehner, adding that he believed Boehner was responsible for the Ebola outbreak. Read more in NEWS.

6. Here's what's coming to Facebook now

Facebook announced Tuesday it plans to do a public service when it brings Amber alerts to users' news feeds. Each alert will include a photograph and other details of the missing child, and will be updated as new information becomes available in each individual case. Police will set the targeted geographical area where the Amber alerts will appear and then depend on users to share them with their friends. Read more in TECH.

And now this ...

Hoping to ward off the next housing crisis, a company called WikiHouse is trying to popularize a 3D-printed house with an open-source design.

3D Print Your Next House 0:43