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Watered-down Democratic 'keep your health plan' bill defeated in House

After Republicans deemed the first version of a Democratic "keep your health insurance" bill alternative non-germane, Democrats tweaked their proposal and offered it again.

That version saw a vote, and it was defeated along party lines, 230-187. Four Democrats voted against, while no Republicans voted in favor.

The tweak took out the provision that would require insurance companies to notify individuals of options available in the health insurance marketplace, premium and cost assistance available in the marketplace, and consumer protections not provided under existing plans.

That very requirement, House Republicans said, is what made the bill non-germane. Since Republicans have a majority in the House, they control what legislation goes to the floor and gets voted on.

The four Democrats voting with Republicans were Jim Matheson of Utah, Mike McIntyre of North Carolina, Mike Michaud of Maine, and Adam Smith of Washington state. Matheson and McIntyre are in competitive "Lean Democratic" districts, according to the Cook Political Report. Michaud is running for governor.

The plan, being referred to as the Landrieu-Lite plan (Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-LA, has proposed her own bill in the Senate) would have done the following, according to a Democratic leadership aide:

- In the case of health plans in effect for individuals as of October 1, 2013, insurers can continue such coverage for those individuals for 2014;

- Makes optional (previous verion REQUIRED) insurance companies to notifying individuals of options available in the health insurance marketplace, premium and cost assistance available in the marketplace, and consumer protections not provided under existing plans;

- The HHS Secretary and the State Commissioners have the authority to go after bad actor insurance companies and take corrective measures against excessive, unjustified, unfair, and discriminatory rates.

However, unlike Landrieu's proposal, House Democrats' proposal does not extend these plans permanently and therefore prevents any long-term, harmful impacts on the Affordable Care Act.

NBC's Domenico Montanaro contributed to this report.