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Martin Shkreli Spends Day After Arrest Livestreaming, Chatting With Supporters

One day after his high-profile arrest by the FBI, disgraced pharma boss Martin Shkreli spent his Friday night at home hanging out with hundreds of strangers via a livestream on his YouTube channel.

Image: Turing Pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli Arrested For Securities Fraud
Martin Shkreli (C), CEO of Turing Pharmaceutical, is brought out of 26 Federal Plaza by law enforcement officials after being arrested for securities fraud on December 17, 2015 in New York City. Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Shkreli, clad in a purple PBS shirt, began streaming video of himself around 4:30 p.m. ET. Hundreds of fans and trolls signed on to watch and post comments to the 32-year-old, who resigned as CEO of his company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, following his Thursday arrest on unrelated securities fraud charges.

During the stream, Shkreli answered questions from viewers as he strummed a guitar, played a few online chess matches and looked through profiles of women on online dating site OKCupid, noting his lawyers would probably not approve.

Embattled Pharma CEO Martin Shkreli Plays 'League of Legends' 0:52

Many commenters urged Shkreli to play the new Wu-Tang Clan album, "Once Upon a Time in Shaolin," for which he reportedly paid $2 million to own the only existing copy. He put on R.E.M.'s 1994 album "Monster" instead.

About halfway through the stream, he began taking calls. One man said he lived in the same building and asked if the pharma bad boy "wanted to chill." Shkreli turned him down.

Another man called to request the former hedge fund manager join him in multiplayer online game "League of Legends." This time the request was honored and the pair played while chatting about hip-hop — Shkreli noted Dr. Dre was his favorite rapper — and women, with Shkreli bragging that his ex-girlfriend had been trying to rekindle things.

Related: Arrested Pharma Boss Martin Shkreli Wanted to Pay Bobby Shmurda's Bail

Shkreli, who the FBI has accused of treating his companies as a "personal piggy bank" and running them "like a Ponzi scheme," spent about three hours broadcasting his night to about 800 people. He abruptly ended the stream around 8 p.m. ET when his brother came over for a visit.